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Shaolin
07-04-2001, 01:25 AM
I know very little to nothing of your art form, about the only thing I have been informed is that the arts philosophy is to go to the ground and then using choke outs or submission holds to immobilize the attacker, my question is; does jujitsu teach finishing techniques for reality/street defense. From what I've seen in competition like the U.F.C. it's either been a victory by choke out or tap out (I haven't seen very many U.F.C.'s either). I thank you and appreciate any further education you have to offer me.

Knifefighter
07-15-2001, 10:32 PM
Chokes, arm breaks, leg breaks, elbows, punches are all finishes in BJJ.

rogue
07-15-2001, 10:46 PM
Remember that all BJJ finishing moves can be countered by just tapping the guy on the leg or back. I hear that the Gracies are trying to find a solution to this problem though. :D


Rogue, you're an @ss!! Watchman

Adventure is just a romantic name for trouble. It sounds swell when you write about it, but it's hell when you meet it face to face in a dark and lonely place.
Louis L'Amour

BTW, did I mention that Rogue was an @ss? Watchman

omegapoint
07-16-2001, 12:33 AM
Mounting an opponent with little or no training in ground-fighting (the majority of the populace), and then beating their face into a pulp, is a decent finishing tech for the street. Ryron Gracie in the most recent Gracie JJ tournament in Cali, finished off many of his opponents with standup submissions. These are also solid techs for 1-on-1 street fighting. BJJ is a very solid fighting style, and they teach street self-defense and disarms as well. They don't really practice striking within the system, but many of the Gracies are great punchers and decent kickers. I hope this helps... :D

Knifefighter
07-16-2001, 02:04 AM
Omega:
I didn't make it to the Gracie nationals, as I left with Caique when he made the split and we weren't invited. I know Ryron won his division and the open, but I hadn't heard he won with any standing submissions. Can you tell me what he finished with on the standing subs??

Stranger
07-16-2001, 02:52 AM
rogue,
lol :D

I don't get mad.
I get stabby.

omegapoint
07-16-2001, 12:45 PM
Knifefighter: Brother, my homey who trains at Gracie Torrance told me that Ryron won a couple of his matches standing. I asked him about the Techs used and before he could answer he got another call and had to click over. When he got back on the line I forgot to reiterate my question and we moved on to another subject. He is good friends with the Gracies and was excited about Ryron getting his Brown Belt and started talking about that. I'll ask him the specifics again later today, and get back to you. Maybe I had an auditory hallucination and just thought he said that, but I'm pretty sure I heard it.

Regardless, that doesn't change my mind about the effectiveness of BJJ as a self-defense art. Granted, it is good to be a know how to strike, but an intermediate practitioner of BJJ can beat most advanced level practitioners of most striking arts.

By the way, your name isn't Beau is it? Just wondering, but from your inquiry I'd gather you came from the Gracie Torrance school, and Beau was trained by Rickson. Peace, man... :D

omegapoint
07-17-2001, 11:44 AM
'Fighter: Whas'sup, man? I talked to my boy today and he told me the same thing. He said that Ryron AND Rener both finished an opponent using a lapel "cross choke". In Ryron's match he placed his left hand on his opponent's left gi lapel and worked it to the back of his neck and faked like he was going for a throw, then he immediately crossed his right hand over his left on the opposite lapel and began to sink the choke in. The dude being choked tried to go to the ground and tried to get him in his guard but started to tap before they hit the ground. He said Rener did a similar cross-choke and the outcome was the same. Ill!!! I can trust this guy 'cause we grew up together overseas, and he not only takes privates with Ryron, but considers him a close friend, too. Later! :D

Shaolin
07-25-2001, 10:27 PM
A thousand thank yous for the information, it was a big help. In the last month I've been doing a little research on BJJ and in my opinion I feel BJJ is an extremly ffect self defence. I would again like to thank Omegapoint and knifefighter very much for your help.

GeneChing
11-13-2019, 10:25 AM
I haven't seen one of these make the news in some time. I hear about some on the down low - nothing I can share publicly. The SF Bay Area is impacted for martial arts schools and of course, there are rivalries.

I'm sure there's turf war posts scattered about this forum but I thought I'd launch a new one. I'll copy it to our For Brazilian Jujitsu Practitioners (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?5954-For-Brazilian-Jujitsu-Practitioners)thread for posterity.



EXCLUSIVE: Martial arts turf war erupts as video shows savage moment Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu master 'elbows rival in the face and kicks him in the head, leaving him with missing teeth and a concussion' (https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7662241/Martial-arts-turf-war-erupts-California-dueling-Jiu-Jitsu-clubs.html?ns_mchannel=rss&ns_campaign=1490&ito=1490)
WARNING: GRAPHIC IMAGE
Flavio Almeida and Ralph Gracie, two of the most senior figures in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, feature in an explosive video obtained exclusively by DailyMail.com
Almeida, 39, was elbowed square in the face by Gracie - knocking out his two front teeth and leaving him concussed from kicks to the head last December
The fight stems from Gracie not wanting Almeida to set up a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu team Gracie Barra franchise 20 miles from his school in San Jose, California
Almeida claims Gracie first threatened him about setting up the franchise and then attacked him while they were both at a Jiu-Jitsu tournament
Later Gracie wrote on social media: 'Because one day somebody gonna try to take something from you and you gonna hafta choke that muthaf**ker'
Almeida has since filed a civil and criminal suit against Almeida after the vicious and allegedly unprovoked attack
By RYAN PARRY WEST COAST EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM AND JOSH BOSWELL FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 14:59 EST, 12 November 2019 | UPDATED: 17:10 EST, 12 November 2019

A martial arts turf war has erupted in violence in California, threatening a rift in a sport popular with millions of people around the world, DailyMail.com can reveal.

Two of America's most senior figures in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu - a popular variant of the classic Japanese martial art - came to blows at a nasty incident on the side-lines at a Jiu-Jitsu tournament last December.

Flavio Almeida, a main director of the leading Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu team, Gracie Barra, told DailyMail.com how he was brutally attacked by Jiu-Jitsu master Ralph 'The Pitbull' Gracie while coaching at the event.

The argument allegedly erupted over Almeida setting up a Gracie Barra franchise 20 miles from Ralph's own Jiu-Jitsu school in San Jose, California.

Almeida, 39, claims his 48-year-old rival first threatened him over the phone before the attack, which was caught on camera.

The video, obtained by DailyMail.com, shows the bone-crunching moment Almeida, 39, was elbowed square in the face by Ralph - knocking out his two front teeth and leaving him concussed from kicks to the head.

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774248-7662241-image-m-3_1573236053724.jpg
Flavio Almeida and Ralph Gracie, two of the most senior figures in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu came to blows in an explosive video obtained exclusively by DailyMail.com. The video shows the bone-crunching moment Almeida, 39, was elbowed square in the face by Ralph - knocking out his two front teeth and leaving him concussed from kicks to the head

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/07/22/20741062-7662241-image-m-6_1573165803705.jpghttps://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/07/22/20741064-7662241-image-m-8_1573165812805.jpg
The fight stems from Gracie (right) not wanting Almeida (left) to set up a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu team Gracie Barra franchise so near to his own school in San Jose, California


BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU AND HOW IT DIFFERS FROM THE TRADITIONAL FORM
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a derivation from the classical Japanese martial art form.

It departs by traditional Jiu-Jitsu by focusing on the element of grappling with emphasis on fighting on the ground, with no striking.

It's also seen as being more relaxed with less formality.

BJJ was founded on the idea that a smaller and weaker person could successfully defend themselves against someone bigger and stronger by focusing on technique, leverage and taking the fight to the ground.

Once the opponent is on the ground, the goal is to control the person before applying chokeholds or joint locks, to get the opponent to tap out.

Almeida, Gracie Barra's North America Executive Director, has launched a criminal claim against his alleged attacker and the case is due in court later this month.

Meanwhile Ralph is the grandson of legendary fighter Carlos Gracie, who founded Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu with brother Helio in the early 1900s and whose son Carlos Jr. is credited with turning the sport into a global success story.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu has become a multi-million dollar industry with founding team Gracie Barra turning the sport into a global phenomenon.

Gracie Barra has 823 schools across six continents and is one of the most dominant teams in the sport, earning senior members of the Gracie family tens of millions of dollars.

Now the shocking attack which was caught on camera, threatens to tarnish the Gracie Barra global brand.

Almeida - who is not a member of the Gracie family but the family members on his side - claims he was first threatened and then attacked by the Jiu-Jitsu master after setting up a Gracie Barra franchise 20 miles from Ralph's own Jiu-Jitsu school in San Jose, California.

Professional fighter Ralph - brother of MMA legend Renzo Gracie - fled to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil after the incident, missing his first court hearing, but returned and was forced to surrender his passport after a grand jury indicted him for felony assault, to which he has pleaded not guilty.

Almeida has also filed a civil suit against his boss' nephew over the alleged beating, in which he claims that two weeks after the vicious and allegedly unprovoked attack, Gracie gloated on social media, writing: 'Because one day somebody gonna try to take something from you and you gonna hafta choke that muthaf**ker.'

In an interview at the Gracie Barra headquarters in Irvine, California, Almeida told DailyMail.com that Ralph's threats began in 2017 when he discovered the company was seeking to open a new school in northern California.

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774250-7662241-image-m-6_1573236118562.jpghttps://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774206-7662241-image-m-9_1573236130382.jpg
The video, obtained by DailyMail.com, shows the bone-crunching moment Almeida, 39, was elbowed square in the face by Ralph - knocking out his two front teeth and leaving him concussed from kicks to the head. Pictured: Almeida missing his two front teeth

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774390-7662241-Almeida_had_to_shell_out_more_than_1_000_in_dentis t_s_fees_for_t-m-17_1573237173708.jpg
Almeida had to shell out more than $1,000 in dentist's fees for temporary replacements so his daughters wouldn't see the jagged gap the assault had left in his mouth.


'He sent threats through mutual friends that ''if you open a school here, bad things will happen'',' Almeida said.

'I decided to call Ralph Gracie out of respect, the conversation didn't go well. He interrupted me and said, ''If you guys come to Northern California, bad things will happen.'' I said ''What do you mean by bad?'', and he said ''You know exactly what I'm talking about.''

Almeida was undeterred, and by August 2018, he had found a franchise owner and arranged the opening of a new school in Morgan Hills, 20 miles from the nearest Ralph Gracie school in San Jose.

'Our franchisee, not knowing about Ralph's concerns, went to Ralph's academy to invite him to the grand opening,' Almeida said. 'Of course he received threats, and he got out of there really scared and concerned.'

Despite the alleged threats, the school opened without incident – until December 15 last year, when Almeida found himself standing next to Gracie on the sidelines of the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation world championship at the Anaheim Convention Center.

'I went there as a coach, because I had five of my athletes competing,' said Almeida. 'While coaching one of them, I looked to my right and I saw Ralph just a couple of inches away from me. This athlete I was coaching happened to be a mutual friend of ours, so Ralph was giving him instructions as well.

'I shook his hand and said ''Master Ralph, how are you?'' I wanted to de-escalate. He turned to me and said ''We need to talk''. I said ''Well, I'm available to talk.'' He said, ''You opened a school in my area'' and I replied ''You need to talk about it with your uncle, Carlos Gracie Jr. This is above my pay grade.''

'Those were the last words I uttered. At that point he unleashed the first of three attacks,' Almeida told DailyMail.com. 'It was an elbow to my face, that knocked me out. Then as I was falling to the floor he grabbed behind my head with his left hand and with his right hand he threw two uppercuts to my face. I'm pretty sure those were the strikes that knocked my teeth out.'
continued next post

GeneChing
11-13-2019, 10:28 AM
https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774386-7662241-image-a-13_1573236265763.jpg
Meanwhile Ralph, 48, is the grandson of legendary fighter Carlos Gracie (pictured), who founded Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu with brother Helio in the early 1900s and whose son Carlos Jr. is credited with turning the sport into a global success story

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774384-7662241-image-a-14_1573236851989.jpg
n an interview at the Gracie Barra headquarters in Irvine, California, Almeida told DailyMail.com that Ralph's threats began in 2017 when he discovered the company was seeking to open a new school in northern California. 'He sent threats through mutual friends that ''if you open a school here, bad things will happen'',' Almeida said. Pictured: Gracie with students at his martial art school

'People got in the middle trying to separate him and protect me. But one of his friends came around and took the opportunity to punch me while I was trying to get up, and said ''Don't mess with the Gracies''.

'While his friend was punching me, Ralph came back and kicked me in the head one more time.'

Two cameras in the room that were set up to record the competition fights caught the savage beating in the background, which Almeida says will now be used as evidence in both the civil and criminal cases against Gracie.

The footage shows Almeida shaking hands with Gracie - who has a 5th degree Black Belt in Jiu-Jitsu - and patting him on the back.

The pair exchange a few words before Gracie appears to lash out, striking Almeida with his elbow in a blow that drops him to the ground instantly.

'As I was coming up, I realized what happened. I felt a mixture of anger and embarrassment. I noticed my two front teeth were missing, I could feel them in my mouth. I was so, so angry,' the Jiu-Jitsu coach said.

'But had I retaliated, I would have dragged the entire organization down with me. That event would have turned into a brawl because you would have people from my side fighting people from his side. It would be a huge mess, to the detriment to the sport of Jiu-Jitsu.'

Almeida says at first he wanted revenge, but in the months after the attack he resolved to pursue Gracie in court as a lesson for others in the sport.

'When you get hit like that, you get angry and you want revenge. This guy has to pay for it,' he said. 'But over time I tried to understand the big picture. Here is a guy who has been well known for being violent, who terrorizes people, using fear to get his way. And it's not only him, there's still people in Jiu-Jitsu who have that old-school, thug mentality.

'So I think my motivation here is just to set an example, that if you do something like that there are real consequences,' he said.

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/12/20/20775820-7662241-Almeida_said_I_saw_Ralph_just_a_couple_of_inches_a way_from_me_I_-a-2_1573588870688.jpg
Almeida said: 'I saw Ralph just a couple of inches away from me. I shook his hand and said ''Master Ralph, how are you?'' I wanted to de-escalate.' Moments later, Almeida said 'he unleashed the first of three attacks. It was an elbow to my face, that knocked me out. Then as I was falling to the floor he grabbed behind my head with his left hand and with his right hand he threw two uppercuts to my face. I'm pretty sure those were the strikes that knocked my teeth out'

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/12/20/20775824-7662241-He_continued_People_got_in_the_middle_trying_to_se parate_him_and-a-3_1573588870689.jpg
He continued: 'People got in the middle trying to separate him and protect me. But one of his friends came around and took the opportunity to punch me while I was trying to get up, and said ''Don't mess with the Gracies''. While his friend was punching me, Ralph came back and kicked me in the head one more time.' Pictured: Gracie (front, center in black) leaving after the explosive incident

'You have these thousands of highly trained martial artists. If they see they can use the power Jiu-Jitsu brings to them to get their way at the expense of other people, this is bad for the sport.'

Gracie has pled not guilty to the criminal charges against him, and his lawyer, James Cook, told Jiu-Jitsu site BJJ Heroes that his client 'would like to tell his side of the story about events leading up to the altercation' but that he had 'strongly advised him to say nothing'.

'I cannot disclose too many details about Ralph's side of the story given attorney-client considerations,' Cook told the site. 'However, I can say that the video does not capture the full spectrum of words and actions leading up to the incident. To view the video within the full context, it is easy to conclude that altercation should be characterized as mutual combat.

'It's worth noting that the incident took place at a combat sporting event. Emotions often run high and disputes materialize off the mats. Regardless, Flavio Almeida and Ralph Gracie are icons of our sport. Because of this, I believe that any further dispute can and should be resolved quickly and without court intervention.'

DailyMail.com reached out to Cook directly but he said he was no longer Gracie's lawyer and so was 'not authorized' to comment further.

DailyMail.com also reached out to Gracie directly for comment but did not receive a response.

Almeida said he was devastated and heartbroken to come home after the attack to his two young girls, bruised and with his two front teeth missing, and feared the impact it would have on them.

He said he was touched when his youngest daughter suggested he place his broken teeth under his pillow for the tooth fairy.

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774892-7662241-image-a-15_1573236953855.jpg
Almeida said he was devastated and heartbroken to come home after the attack to his two young girls, bruised and with his two front teeth missing, and feared the impact it would have on them. He said he was touched when his youngest daughter suggested he place his broken teeth under his pillow for the tooth fairy

https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/08/18/20774870-7662241-image-a-16_1573236962552.jpg
Almeida (center) says at first he wanted revenge, but in the months after the attack he resolved to pursue Gracie in court as a lesson for others in the sport

But unlike his children who were used to getting money for their lost teeth, Almeida had to shell out more than $1,000 in dentist's fees for temporary replacements so his daughters wouldn't see the jagged gap the assault had left in his mouth.

The attack has caused an even greater gap in the Gracie family, Almeida said, which is split over how to deal with the situation.

'I know that the family is very divided,' he said. 'Some people think that Carlos Gracie Jr should ask me not to do anything and let Ralph get out of it without any sort of punishment, and there's a lot of people who support our position of holding him accountable.

'The split is between people who believe martial arts is a tool to improve people's lives and help the community, and the people who think they can use the power of martial arts for their own gain.

'In their minds, they are the real Gracies, and Gracie Barra has become this commercial enterprise that is selling out Gracie Jiu-Jitsu,' he said. 'We're moving the Gracie legacy forward, bringing the great benefits of Jiu-Jitsu to more and more people around the world. But they don't seem to see it that way.

'Carlos Gracie Jr is extremely disappointed. Ralph Gracie happens to be his nephew, the son of his brother. He disapproves of his behavior. His position is Ralph has to pay for the crime he committed.'

Carlos Gracie Jr's father was one of the founders of the sport of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in his native country after training with a Japanese immigrant martial arts expert.

The sport exploded in popularity when family member Royce Gracie won three of the first four Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) tournaments using Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

The patriarch's son, Carlos Gracie Jr, founded the company Gracie Barra and helped grow the industry to become a multi-billion-dollar sport.

Celebrities practicing Jiu-jitsu include Keanu Reeves, Jason Statham, Guy Ritchie and Ashton Kutcher. You know, I haven't seen any local coverage of this. Maybe I missed it. Ironic that I found it on Daily Mail, a UK news group. :o

GeneChing
01-23-2020, 09:57 AM
US Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang: “Police Officers Should Be BJJ Purple Belts” (https://www.bjjee.com/bjj-news/us-presidential-candidate-andrew-yang-police-officers-should-be-bjj-purple-belts/)
SEP 11, 2019

https://www.bjjee.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/andrew-yang-jiu-jitsu.jpg

2020 USA Presidential Candidate Andrew Yang is young and hip. He recently shared the following on the social media:

https://i.redd.it/zf1ogi72mov21.jpg

Presidential Candidate Andy Yang Suggests All Police Be BJJ Purple Belts:

What many don’t realize is that jiu jitsu has a history with american presidents having been a significant part of Teddy Roosvelt’s life
Below is an extract from “Professor Yama****a Goes to Washington”:


“during March and April 1904, Roosevelt practiced judo three afternoons a week, using a ground floor office in the White House as his workout space. Then, for the rest of the summer, he practiced occasionally. He stopped training during the elections, and there is no record showing that he resumed his studies afterward.
The President’s training partners included his sons, his private secretary, the Japanese naval attache, Secretary of War William Howard Taft, and Secretary of the Interior Gifford Pinchot. When these people were unavailable, then Roosevelt tried his tricks on husky young visitors.”


https://www.bjjee.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/jiu-jitsu.jpg

Yama****a went to the White House to meet President Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt practiced wrestling and boxing while in the White House, and he had received jujutsu jackets from William Sturgis Bigelow and jujutsu lessons from J. J. O’Brien, a Philadelphia police officer who had studied jujutsu while living in Nagasaki. Roosevelt was impressed with Yama****a’s skill, and during March and April 1904, Yama****a gave judo lessons to the President and interested family and staff in a room at the White House.

mid-1920s

In a letter from the White House from Theodore Roosevelt to his son Kermit dated Febuary 24, 1905.


https://www.bjjee.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/RooseveltBJJ1-288x372.jpg“………I still box with Grant, who has now become the champion middleweight wrestler of the United States. Yesterday afternoon we had Professor Yama****a up here to wrestle with Grant. It was very interesting, but of course jiu jitsu and our wrestling are so far apart that is it difficult to make any comparison between them. Wrestling is simply a sport with rules almost as conventional as those of tennis, while jiu jitsu is really meant for practice in killing or disabling our adversary. In consequence, Grant did not know what to do except to put Yama****a on his back, and Yama****a was perfectly content to be on his back. Inside of a minute Yama****a had choked Grant, and inside two minutes more he got an elbow hold on him that would have enabled him to break his arm; so that there is no question but that he could have put Grant out. So far this made it evident that the jiu jitsu man could handle the ordinary wrestler. But Grant, in the actual wrestling and throwing was about as good as the Japanese and he was so much stronger that he evidently hurt and wore out the Japanese. With a little practice in the art I am sure that one of our big wrestlers or boxers, simply because of his greatly superior strength, would be able to kill any of those Japanese, who though very good men for their inches and pounds are altogether too small to hold their own against big, powerful, quick men who are as well trained.”

THREADS
Martial Arts Politicians (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?65916-Martial-Arts-Politicians)
For Brazilian Jujitsu Practitioners (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?5954-For-Brazilian-Jujitsu-Practitioners)

GeneChing
06-25-2021, 10:24 AM
How one police agency used martial arts to reduce use-of-force injuries (https://www.abc15.com/news/local-news/investigations/how-one-police-agency-used-martial-arts-to-reduce-use-of-force-injuries)
By: Melissa BlasiusPosted at 10:42 PM, Jun 10, 2021 and last updated 2:52 PM, Jun 11, 2021

A Georgia police department is rethinking policing by requiring officers to undergo martial arts training in an effort to reduce injuries during arrests.

Marietta officers are learning Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which uses grappling tactics, like body leverage moves and submission holds, not punches or strikes.

The police department shared body-cam videos with ABC15 showing on-duty takedowns. The officers get people under control quickly and physically but without injury. The department credits Brazilian jiu-jitsu training.

"You're now walking into it with a sense of confidence that I know I can take this person to the ground and restrain them until help arrives," said Officer Chuck McPhilamy, a spokesman for the Marietta Police Department.

For Marietta, their turning point was in 2019 after a viral video showed their officers in a violent encounter in an IHOP restaurant. They pile on, punch, and taser Renardo Lewis.

As police leadership looked to reduce levels of force in future situations, a major in the department suggested Brazilian jiu-jitsu. The major and several other officers were already doing the training on their own, and he had previously pitched the idea of offering it to all officers.

Since then, all new Marietta officers must train in Brazilian jiu-jitsu for several months. Existing officers are also encouraged to go.

According to Marietta police, in 2020, they compared officers who knew Brazilian jiu-jitsu to officers without training. They calculated:

48% reduction of injuries to officers using force
53% reduction of injuries to the person being arrested when force was required
23% reduction of the use of Tasers
They also noticed something about police behavior.

"A lot of officers tend to go up and scale on their use-of-force because of the fact that they don't have that conditioning or because they don't have that training," said Marietta Sgt. Ray Figueroa.

The city pays for the classes and the officers' time.

"The city has discovered that even at all of those costs," Officer McPhilamy said, "it pales in comparison to the savings that they're having."

McPhilamy noted workers' compensation savings for officers who are injured on duty.

ABC15 also spoke to Mike Lin, a retired Phoenix police officer who is also a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

"It helped me get out of situations," Lin said. "I believe it saved my life and even the subjects that I'm dealing with - their lives, as well."

Lin plans to offer free training to Valley officers at GD Jiu-Jitsu in Tempe later this year.

"Anytime you can add a new skill set to your job and your profession, it's going to make you a better police officer," Lin said.

Marietta police recommend other departments also try jiu-jitsu, but they say without an influential champion for the cause, it may be hard to convince others to commit to the initial investment.


threads
Fighting-style-for-law-enforcement (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?16928-Fighting-style-for-law-enforcement)
For-Brazilian-Jujitsu-Practitioners (http://www.kungfumagazine.com/forum/showthread.php?5954-For-Brazilian-Jujitsu-Practitioners)