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Thread: BSL Lyrics: Lin Bo Kin

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    So. Oregon
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    344
    I made them from the movements! I just named it from similar movements that were already in the set. I just got the chinese lyrics yesterday!! I'll be going over those next (with someone who can read Chinese of course)!!

    ~Jason
    館術國勇威 Wei Yong Martial Arts Association
    戰挑的權霸統傳 The Challenge for Traditional Supremacy
    http://www.weiyongkungfu.com
    _________________________
    What is 'traditional kung fu' ?
    Chinese fighting arts developed before the advent of the modern age in China. Not to be confused with modern, post-1949, Wushu or competitive fighting such as kick boxing .
    By Shanghai Jing Mo

  2. #17

    Lian Bu Quan

    Here is another version of Lian Bu Quan.

    http://www.luhealthcenter.com/lian-bu-quan-3.html

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    1,349
    Looks like there a few extra strikes in the beginning. At least based on the one I am learning at my current kwoon.

    Ya know, I am always one to criticize forms. I think it may be time to put one up of myself.
    Master of Shaolin I-Ching Bu Ti, GunGoPow and I Hung Wei Lo styles.

    I am seeking sparring partner. Any level. Looking for blondes or redhead. 5'2" to 5'9". Between 115-135 weight class. Females between 17-30 only need apply. Will extensively work on grappling.

  4. #19
    Join Date
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    ttt 4 2020!

    I've been doing some research into some BSL quanpu lately. Sifu Roberto Baptista sent me these and gave me permission to post them here.

    The Translations are in Portuguese:

    練步拳
    (Lihn Bouh Kyhn - Lin B Qun – Forma de Treinar Passo)

    1. 對掌陰陽�Du zhǎng yīnyng�Palmas se opondo Yin Yang
    2. 弓步切掌�Gōng b qi zhǎng�Passo de arco, palma cortante1
    3. 開門手�Kāimn shǒu�Mo que abre a porta
    4. 順步衝捶�Shn b chōng chu�Passo seguido, soco direto2
    5. 腋下切掌�Y xi qi zhǎng�Palma cortante de baixo do brao
    6. 仙人擔柴�Xiānrn dān chi�Imortal carrega lenha
    7. 坐馬蓋掌�Zu mǎ gi zhǎng�Sentar no cavalo, palma que cobre
    8. 坐馬撑掌�Zu mǎ chēng zhǎng�Sentar no cavalo, palma que suporta
    9. 圈手劈捶�Quān shǒu pī chu�Circular com a mo, soco talhador
    10. 坐馬壓掌�Zu mǎ yā zhǎng�Sentar no cavalo, palma que pressiona
    11. 穿掌點侯�Chuān zhǎng diǎn hu�Palma penetrante acerta o alvo3
    12. 坐馬架打�Zu mǎ ji dǎ�Sentar no cavalo, sustentar e bater
    13. 葉下偷桃�Y xi tōu to�Roubar pssego em baixo da folha
    14. 丁式劈掌�Dīng sh pī zhǎng�Postura T, palma talhadora
    15. 滑步圈手劈捶�Hu b quān shǒu pī chu�Deslizar o passo, circular com a mo, soco talhador
    16. 提腿連環掌�T tuǐ linhun zhǎng�Levantar a perna, palma contnua
    17. 拍地飛沙�Pāi d fēi shā�Bater no cho para voar areia
    18. 圈手劈捶�Quān shǒu pī chu�Circular com a mo, soco talhador
    19. 左右窩心肘�Zuǒyu wōxīn zhǒu�Cotovelos que escondem corao para esquerda e direita
    20. 坐馬壓掌�Zu mǎ yā zhǎng�Sentar no cavalo, palma que pressiona
    21. 撞膝旋身�Zhung xī xun shēn�Colidir com o joelho, virar o corpo
    22. 雙捧掌�Shuāng pěng zhǎng�Dupla palma que segura
    23. 葉底偷桃�Y dǐ tōu to�Roubar o pssego debaixo da folha
    24. 丁式劈掌�Dīng sh pī zhǎng�Postura em T, palma talhadora para baixo
    25. 滑步圈手劈捶�Hu b quān shǒu pī chu�Deslizar o passo, circular com a mo, soco talhador
    26. 七星掠翅 (左式)�Qīxīng l ch (zuǒ sh)�Sete estrelas, saquear asa (Postura esquerda)
    27. 七星掠翅 (右式)�Qīxīng l ch (yu sh)�Sete estrelas, saquear asa (Postura direita)
    28. 退步圈手劈捶�Tub quān shǒu pī Chu�Passo para trs, circular com a mo, soco talhador
    29. 退步圈手劈捶�Tub quān shǒu pī Chu�Passo para trs, circular com a mo, soco talhador
    30. 撞膝旋身�Zhung xī xun shēn�Colidir com o joelho, virar o corpo
    31. 雙捧掌�Shuāng pěng zhǎng�Dupla palma que segura
    32. 撞膝旋身�Zhung xī xun shēn�Colidir com o joelho, virar o corpo
    33. 雙捧掌�Shuāng pěng zhǎng�Dupla palma que segura
    34. 對掌陰陽�Du zhǎng yīnyng�Palmas se opondo Yin Yang
    35. 收式�Shōu sh�Postura de juntar
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    As does many others - Lin Bo is a pretty common form, so there are many manifestations. Bryant Fong has sort of a wushu twist to his version, with some flashy kicks added around move 25.

    And I love doing kungfu while sitting on my butt - aint' that what the forum's all about?
    was gonna ask the same question, Dr. Yang's variation was the first I saw of it, and in mandarin lol, Lian Bu Quan. Ironically I had Sifu Lam's Moi Fah book at the same time, and never made the connection between them having similar curriculum in terms of classical BSL. Also had not made the distinction between BSL and Songshan curriculum at the time. I was streaming all "Northern Shaolin" under the same umbrella. South Shaolin was Hung Gar only to me back then also. So it all made sense later why I gravitated toward certain teachers in my seeking, and strayed away from others. I'm thankful for Sifu Lam, and Dr. Yang for sharing the way they do.

    Now speaking of sitting on the butt kung fu training lol, I'm seriously gonna go train now
    Reading Shaolin Trips early on you make a clear description of how the kids in Shaolin village train (24/7), as opposed to the western hobbyist. Since reading that part of the book, I'm trying my best to train more frequently at any chance I can, rather than just a specific time of day.
    and I know I will be tested. :P

    Amituofo
    "色即是空 , 空即是色 " ~ Buddha via Avalokitesvara
    Shaolin Meditator

  6. #21
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    Jan 1970
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    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
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    Why my Lianbuquan is Different from Yours

    Read my Latest Feature for YMAA: Why my Lianbuquan is Different from Yours

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Why my Lianbuquan is Different from Yours
    Well said "To step outside your school, you must first step inside of it".

    That said, I would add, search the variations for things that were lost from one's school.

    Would love to see any videos of those two different variations of that form.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Mich.
    Posts
    360
    Quote Originally Posted by YinOrYan View Post
    Well said "To step outside your school, you must first step inside of it".

    That said, I would add, search the variations for things that were lost from one's school.

    Would love to see any videos of those two different variations of that form.
    I find the form "differences" very interesting as well.

    My background is in Okinawan Karate, and there are variations on forms as well. In Okinawa, the forms were modified by the teacher based on the student's attributes etc. After WW2, karate was taught for very good money in Okinawa and that is when things started to really get cemented in and "the way" of doing things".

    I wonder if a form like this was also taught a little bit differently by each instructor and their emphasis and then "cemented" as the tradition was passed on.

    I also agree that in the variations we can also see potentials of what the form can teach and show us.
    "God gave you a brain, and it annoys Him greatly when you choose not to use it."

  9. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin73 View Post

    I wonder if a form like this was also taught a little bit differently by each instructor and their emphasis and then "cemented" as the tradition was passed on.

    I also agree that in the variations we can also see potentials of what the form can teach and show us.
    The "cemented" tradition you mention may be in part because of film and video became available but were expensive to start with. Now it may be the opposite, because one can now see all over the internet how forms tend to mututate. Overall its made the study of forms a lot more interesting. Now all this makes it easier to understand a form's structure and applications, and also compare to written and musical sources connected to them.

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