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Thread: Weight Lifting

  1. #61
    Anyone here?

  2. #62
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    I'm sure everyone would love to help but you'll find so much information on the web, you'd be better off searching for exactly what you want. There are programs suited to whatever it is you want to get out of lifting weights.....strenght, definition, power, endurance, weight loss, etc. Figure out exactly what you want, then search for info or get some books and magazines.

    Sounds like now, you're interested in gaining strength. I think its extremely important to be physically strong in the martial arts. Not only does it give you foundation for power in your strikes, but it gives you a solid structure to take hits and well as a little intimidation over the opponent.

    What I've done in the past is sets where you increase weight and decrease reps. For example on the bench for where it sounds like you are at: Warmup, 8 reps - 110lb, 8 reps - 120, 6 reps - 130, 4 reps - 140. You can change these. Always have a spotter and the last rep should really be a struggle - not only does this make you stronger, but helps strengthen your mental toughness. Always try to increase the totals as you go. You might only increase on the 1st set and keep the rest the same. That's alright. Don't underestimate the amount of time for rest. If your working your muscles very hard, only work them once a week.

    This is just one example. Like I said.....read, read, and read some more. Keep changing it up and find what works for you.
    Aut Pax Aut Bellum - Either Peace or War

  3. #63
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    You can lift weights but i don't recommend it for a beginner. Don't try to use your muscles to be stiff, tense or to power the guy .

    If you are tense when you touch hands, lifting weights will make you DE PROGRESS, if that's even a word.

    kung fu books

  4. #64
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    I believe everyone should lift

    Everything aside, everyone should be doing some sort of weight bearing lifting. It has clinically been proven to help bone density as people get older, toned muscle burns more fat. There are all sorts of reasons beyond just gaining strength for lifting

    Charles Staley. He has written a number of good books specifically for weight training and the martial artists.
    <http://www.integratedsportsolutions.com>
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    Last edited by tiger2dragon; 11-09-2002 at 12:02 PM.

  5. #65
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    That would be REGRESS, I think.

    But, if you prefer body weight exercises but feel you will necessarily hit a wall, why not just add more weight to your body? Ankle weight, wrist weights, weight vests, stuff like that?
    He who establishes his argument by noise and command shows that his reason is weak. - Montaigne

  6. #66
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    weight lifting

    what sort of routines does everyone get into here?

    there are a lot of threads about weight lifting here, but not many about how to incorporate modern lifting with classical or traditional martial arts.

    anyone do this?

    experiences?

    cheers
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  7. #67
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    . . . When I'm training, I generally do a twice-a-week, full-body routine, with focus on my rotator cuffs and the interior of my legs to correct a patella tracking problem. Other than that, I go (or rather went) for compound actions, like clean and press, neutral grip pullups, deadlifts, DB bench, things like that.

    no squats, though. strange knees, messed up a few vertebrae. Used to squat 300 @ 145-150 a while ago, though.
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  8. #68
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    Originally posted by Vash
    . . . When I'm training, I generally do a twice-a-week, full-body routine, with focus on my rotator cuffs and the interior of my legs to correct a patella tracking problem. Other than that, I go (or rather went) for compound actions, like clean and press, neutral grip pullups, deadlifts, DB bench, things like that.

    no squats, though. strange knees, messed up a few vertebrae. Used to squat 300 @ 145-150 a while ago, though.
    ****. Double bw squat is awesome.
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  9. #69
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    Yeah, I was pretty proud of myself. Now, I'm making it a personal goal to tie my shoes without contorting into positions from the Kama Sutra.
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  10. #70
    Kung Lek, PTP. Why? Because there's no soreness and minimal fatigue, so it hardly affects my MA. Plus you get strong. Pretty much as strong as you can. Plus you don't increase in size too much (at all for me as I started it already trained). Plus it only takes a short time. Lots of pros. Can't think of any cons. Lifts? The powerlifts plus pullups.
    "If trolling is an art then I am your yoda.if spelling counts, go elsewhere.........." - BL

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  11. #71
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    Muscular women

    Three Hong Kong women weightlifters who aren’t shy about showing their muscles
    Powerlifting is growing in popularity among Hong Kong women, who see having a muscular figure as inspiring and feminine and say the sport has boosted their self-confidence
    PUBLISHED : Saturday, 14 October, 2017, 6:45pm
    UPDATED : Sunday, 15 October, 2017, 7:01pm
    Rachel Cheung



    Stephanie Tsui Yan-ting began powerlifting two years ago to find a common interest with her boyfriend, and it has changed her life.
    Now she hits the gym five times a week – waking up before dawn and training for two hours before heading to work – and can dead lift 140kg, more than double her weight.
    Tsui, 26, who trains at Fitness First, is among a growing number of women getting into weightlifting and resistance training. Nowhere is the trend more apparent than on social media, which is flooded with images of women in their workout gear flexing their biceps, pumping iron and documenting their transformation. The trending hashtag #girlswholift garners 17.8 million results on Instagram alone.
    Bobbie Poulton, who has practised like an Olympic weightlifter for nearly 10 years, believes social media has influenced women’s attitudes towards the sport.
    “Women are going to the gym and picking up the barbells. They are not scared walking to the weights area any more, whereas before it was completely off limits. Now it’s cool. You can buy pink dumbbells,” says Poulton, 26, a senior strength and conditioning coach at Pinnacle Performance in Wan Chai, and a CrossFit athlete.


    Female personal trainer Bobbie Poulton pumps some iron in Pinnacle Performance gym in Wan Chai. Photo: K.Y. Cheng

    “If you look at the rest of the world, weightlifting has definitely taken off. There are women doing CrossFit, running around with six-packs [well-defined abdominal muscles] … and it’s actually looked upon as an achievement,” Poulton adds.
    In Hong Kong and most of Asia, though, the female weightlifting community remains relatively small. One factor stands in the way – the fear of gaining muscles and becoming bulky. The slim beauty ideal is almost universal, but it is more ingrained in Asian societies in which most women are petite and women are held to an even higher standard than elsewhere.
    Poulton has had female clients who quit training with her because they deemed her too muscular and worried they would end up looking the same.
    “This has happened four or five times, even though I’ve made it very clear I look the way I do purely because I’ve chosen to train to look like this. It’s actually very difficult to gain muscle mass. If it wasn’t, I’d look like Arnold Schwarzenegger,” says Poulton, who every now and then encounters female clients who panic at the thought of beefing up.
    “When I go to the gym with my friends, we celebrate getting bigger muscles,” says Poulton. When a new friend commented on her legs, “oh my god, they are massive”, she gladly took it as a compliment.
    In the Asian community, that type of observation is often dished out or taken as a criticism, instead. Tsui recalls being publicly shamed for having big calves – two male strangers on the streets looked her up and down and remarked that her legs were too thick.


    Weightlifter Stephanie Tsui goes through her routine at Fitness First in Central. Photo: David Wong

    The size of her legs has always been a source of insecurity for Tsui. In high school, to slim down her limbs, she went on diets and exercised so much that she started losing her hair and her period stopped for months. While weightlifting did not make her legs thinner – if anything, she has gained a more muscular frame – she has come to embrace them.
    “To a certain extent, how your limbs look are determined by your genes and cannot be changed drastically. Why not just own it and work with what you’ve got? If I can’t be proud of how my thighs look, maybe I can be proud of what they can do,” says Tsui.
    Her goal now is to become stronger. If that means buffing up physically, then so be it. There are drawbacks, such as difficulties in finding clothes that fit, but they are minor compared to the health benefits and satisfaction weightlifting brings.
    “It’s very empowering. You do not have to rely on men to help you carry things,” says Tsui.
    With more representation of fit women in popular culture and social media, traditional beauty ideals are slowly shifting. It helps that more women, like Tsui, are setting performance goals – like lifting more weight – rather than aesthetic ones like losing more weight, and realising what they are capable of.


    Poulton believes social media has influenced women’s attitudes towards the sport. Photo: K.Y. Cheng

    “Before it was hard for me to convince women it’s possible to work towards a pull-up [an exercise in which you hold onto a bar above your head and pull your body up until your chin is above the bar]. Now I’m teaching women to do a muscle-up [an exercise to strengthen the arms and upper body, lifting one’s own weight while hanging from a bar to a position above the bar]. I am seeing more goals like that, rather than just wanting to lose weight. That’s a change I really enjoy seeing,” says Kay Kay Keung, one of the founders of Trybe Studio in Wong Chuk Hang.


    Tsui braces herself for a lift at Fitness First in Central. Photo: David Wong

    Keung, who grew up in the US state of North Carolina, started weight training at the age of 12 when she followed her older brother into the gym. As a competitive athlete who swims, runs and plays lacrosse as well as American football, becoming stronger gives Keung an edge over other players, even male ones.
    “I used to race against boys and even played football with boys. I wanted to make sure I wasn’t the girl who’s getting left out or the weak person on the team.”
    Having retired from the Hong Kong lacrosse team after competing in the World Cup this July, Keung is now getting ready to participate in international weightlifting competitions next year.
    With more female weightlifters, whether professional or amateur, joining the sport, the obsession over a slender figure is not the only gender stereotype they are breaking.
    Keung (centre) goes through some exercises at Trybe Studio in Wong Chuk Hang. Photo: Nora Tam
    “One fear I had when I started out as a trainer was that people wouldn’t trust me as a coach, because I am female and small. When they think of a trainer, they have an image of a male buff guy, and that’s not what I am,” says Keung, 27. “Even though I have the knowledge or skills, I still had the fear of people not recognising it in females.”
    When she first became a personal trainer five years ago, she had 35 male colleagues and only three female ones.
    “They would suggest that men train with me because they are attracted to me, not because they think I am a good trainer,” says Keung, of her male colleagues, who also questioned why she did not wear make-up or pull the zip of her jacket a little lower.
    Those types of comments have faded and she is the proud owner of her own gym, where three out of five co-founders are women – a positive sign that things are starting to change.
    For any woman interested in resistance training, Poulton has this simple advice. “Start now. There’s nothing to be scared of. If you are unsure, I’d say speak to a female coach because they will be able to empathise with you.”
    She adds: “We all started somewhere.”
    Odd article because none of these women are that burly, at least not so much to be unattractive. Besides, I find muscular women kinda hot.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #72
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    Strong, healthy and fit is a good trait for anyone to have at any age.
    My 6 pack is not holding up well, I gotta say... **** middle age adipose tissue takeover!!!!

    Kung Fu is good for you.

  13. #73
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    qeySuS,

    There are two goals in weight lifting - aim for endurance, strength.

    Train for Strength - use 80% of maxmium weight one could lift for each exercise.

    Train for Endurance - use 60% of maxmium weight one could lift for each exercise.

    This is what you will learn in Weight Lifting 101. And even one goal is to train for endurance, there will always be some gain in muscle strength.
    Good luck.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLau View Post
    qeySuS,

    There are two goals in weight lifting - aim for endurance, strength.

    Train for Strength - use 80% of maxmium weight one could lift for each exercise.

    Train for Endurance - use 60% of maxmium weight one could lift for each exercise.

    This is what you will learn in Weight Lifting 101. And even one goal is to train for endurance, there will always be some gain in muscle strength.
    Good luck.



    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong
    No, no and no

  15. #75
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    for depression

    PHYS ED
    Weight Training May Help to Ease or Prevent Depression
    Benefits essentially were the same whether people went to the gym twice a week or five times a week.


    CreditiStock

    By Gretchen Reynolds
    June 6, 2018

    Lifting weights might also lift moods, according to an important new review of dozens of studies about strength training and depression. It finds that resistance exercise often substantially reduces people’s gloom, no matter how melancholy they feel at first, or how often — or seldom — they actually get to the gym and lift.

    There already is considerable evidence that exercise, in general, can help to both stave off and treat depression. A large-scale 2016 review that involved more than a million people, for instance, concluded that being physically fit substantially reduces the risk that someone will develop clinical depression. Other studies and reviews have found that exercise also can reduce symptoms of depression in people who have been given diagnoses of the condition.

    But most of these past studies and reviews have focused on aerobic exercise, such as walking or jogging.

    Far less has been known about the possible benefits, if any, of strength training for mental health. One 2017 analysis of past research had found that strength training can help people feel less anxious and nervous.

    But anxiety is not depression.

    So for the new study, which was published in May in JAMA Psychiatry, the same researchers who earlier had examined anxiety and resistance exercise now turned their attention to depression.

    They wanted to see whether the available research could tell us if lifting weights meaningfully affects the onset and severity of depression. They also sought to determine if the amount of the exercise and the age, health or gender of the exercisers would matter.

    The researchers began by gathering all of the best past studies related to resistance exercise and depression. They were interested only in randomized experiments with a control group, meaning that some people had been assigned to start exercising while others had not. These experiments are the gold standard for testing the effects of exercise and other interventions.

    The experiments also had to include testing for depression before and after the training.

    The researchers ultimately found 33 experiments of weight training and depression that met their criteria. The studies involved almost 2,000 men and women of various ages, some of whom had been diagnosed with depression, while others had not.

    The researchers aggregated the results from all of these studies and then began digging through the data.

    What they found was that resistance training consistently reduced the symptoms of depression, whether someone was formally depressed at the start of the study or not. In other words, if people began the study with depression, they usually felt better after taking up weight training. And if they started out with normal mental health, they ended the experiment with less chance of having become morose and sad than people who did not train.

    Perhaps most interesting, the amount of weight training did not seem to matter. The benefits essentially were the same, whether people went to the gym twice a week or five times a week and whether they were completing lots of repetitions of each exercise or only a few.

    The mental health impacts were similar, too, for men and women and for younger lifters (often college students) and people who were middle-aged or elderly.
    And people did not need to pack on mass or might to reduce their depression. More strength after the experiment did not correlate with less depression, the researchers found.

    All that mattered was showing up and completing the workouts.

    Only a few of the studies had also included a separate group who tried aerobic exercise, making it difficult to compare the effects of that kind of workout with those of lifting weights.

    But while the number of people involved was small, the combined results suggest that weight training and aerobic exercise have similar impacts on depression, the authors of the new review conclude.

    Both types of exercise reduced symptoms, and to about the same extent.
    This kind of review cannot tell us, though, how strength training might be influencing mental health.

    The exercise probably has both physiological and psychological consequences, says Brett Gordon, a graduate student at the University of Limerick in Ireland, who led the new review. The weight training could be changing aspects of the brain, including the levels of various neurochemicals that influence moods, he says.

    “Expectancy could also be at work,” he says. People expect the workouts to make them feel more cheerful, and they do. (It’s impossible to blind people about whether they are lifting weights or not, he points out. So some of the psychological benefits might be the result of a biological placebo effect, which nonetheless produces real benefits.)
    The review’s results do not indicate that resistance training is better for combating depression than other kinds of exercise, Mr. Gordon says. Nor do the results suggest that exercise can, or should, replace traditional therapies, including medication.

    But as a whole, he says, the data do suggest that visiting the gym and lifting weights a few times a week might be an effective way to buoy mental health.
    I dunno, man. Whenever I lift, I get depressed on how bad I am at it. But then, I don't lift really, not since I was NCAA in college and in training.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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