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Thread: Fighting style for law enforcement?

  1. #91
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    My first week in Florida I got pulled over for an expired tag by this rookie cop. Really enthusiastic guy, first week out on patrol by himself. "Did you know your tag expired on January 1st?" was the first thing he asked me. I explained to him that in the Georgia tag system (at that time) tags did expire at the first of the year but that there was a 5-month renewal period, and that you could not renew your tag until your "number" came up. In my case, March (still a month away).

    The cop shows me the back of my registration and says, "Yeah, but it says it expires, right here! I saw it this morning when I pulled over somebody else from Georgia."

    I went, "Yeah, but did you see the paragraph under it? The one that explains the renewal procedure?" His eyes just glazed over and he said, "That doesn't matter. I've pulled over like, 40 people today and they're ALL expired! Isn't that something!"

    Took the ticket to court and the judge threw it out. He said I was probably the hundredth Georgia driver he'd seen that week.
    There is a great streak of violence in every human being. If it is not channeled and understood, it will break out in war or in madness. ~Sam Peckinpah

  2. #92
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    ewallace, OK, you've tried a Krispy Kreme, and that's all that matters. My boyfriend doesn't like them either (he calls them Krispy Kritters). To each his own, I guess.
    There is a great streak of violence in every human being. If it is not channeled and understood, it will break out in war or in madness. ~Sam Peckinpah

  3. #93
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    ttt 4 2021

    Bucks County Law Enforcement Officials Studying Martial Arts As Non-Lethal Use Of Force To Protect Communities
    By CBS3 Staff
    February 22, 2021 at 12:26 pm

    BUCKS COUNTY, Pa. (CBS) — Law enforcement officials in Bucks County are studying martial arts as a non-lethal use of force while protecting their communities. Eyewitness News was at MPR Endurance Mixed Martial Arts Studio in Lancaster Monday, where officers viewed a demonstration of techniques to use when dealing with situations when force is needed.

    The event was organized by Philadelphia City Councilman David Oh, who is a martial arts instructor.

    Last post here 2002. Thread necromancy FTW.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #94
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    Notable stats


    How one police agency used martial arts to reduce use-of-force injuries

    By: Melissa BlasiusPosted at 10:42 PM, Jun 10, 2021 and last updated 2:52 PM, Jun 11, 2021

    A Georgia police department is rethinking policing by requiring officers to undergo martial arts training in an effort to reduce injuries during arrests.

    Marietta officers are learning Brazilian jiu-jitsu, which uses grappling tactics, like body leverage moves and submission holds, not punches or strikes.

    The police department shared body-cam videos with ABC15 showing on-duty takedowns. The officers get people under control quickly and physically but without injury. The department credits Brazilian jiu-jitsu training.

    "You're now walking into it with a sense of confidence that I know I can take this person to the ground and restrain them until help arrives," said Officer Chuck McPhilamy, a spokesman for the Marietta Police Department.

    For Marietta, their turning point was in 2019 after a viral video showed their officers in a violent encounter in an IHOP restaurant. They pile on, punch, and taser Renardo Lewis.

    As police leadership looked to reduce levels of force in future situations, a major in the department suggested Brazilian jiu-jitsu. The major and several other officers were already doing the training on their own, and he had previously pitched the idea of offering it to all officers.

    Since then, all new Marietta officers must train in Brazilian jiu-jitsu for several months. Existing officers are also encouraged to go.

    According to Marietta police, in 2020, they compared officers who knew Brazilian jiu-jitsu to officers without training. They calculated:

    48% reduction of injuries to officers using force
    53% reduction of injuries to the person being arrested when force was required
    23% reduction of the use of Tasers
    They also noticed something about police behavior.

    "A lot of officers tend to go up and scale on their use-of-force because of the fact that they don't have that conditioning or because they don't have that training," said Marietta Sgt. Ray Figueroa.

    The city pays for the classes and the officers' time.

    "The city has discovered that even at all of those costs," Officer McPhilamy said, "it pales in comparison to the savings that they're having."

    McPhilamy noted workers' compensation savings for officers who are injured on duty.

    ABC15 also spoke to Mike Lin, a retired Phoenix police officer who is also a black belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

    "It helped me get out of situations," Lin said. "I believe it saved my life and even the subjects that I'm dealing with - their lives, as well."

    Lin plans to offer free training to Valley officers at GD Jiu-Jitsu in Tempe later this year.

    "Anytime you can add a new skill set to your job and your profession, it's going to make you a better police officer," Lin said.

    Marietta police recommend other departments also try jiu-jitsu, but they say without an influential champion for the cause, it may be hard to convince others to commit to the initial investment.
    threads
    Fighting-style-for-law-enforcement
    For-Brazilian-Jujitsu-Practitioners
    Gene Ching
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  5. #95
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    My guess is that besides the use of baton, fighting style that has lot of grappling and wrestling techniques should be integrated into police martial art training. Take the case of a riot in 2019 Hong Kong, a female police sat on a rioter's back (not her neck) after subduing her, and waited for backup to take the rioter to the police station for processing.





    Regards,

    KC
    Hong Kong

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    Last edited by SteveLau; 06-27-2021 at 12:45 AM.

  6. #96
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    Guyana Police Force Martial Arts Academy

    Mixed martial arts federation to provide official accreditation for police academy

    Members of the GMMAF and GPFMA pose for a photo during the consultative process for local accreditation
    By Stabroek News November 19, 2021

    The Guyana Mixed Martial Arts Federation (GMMFA) recently met with several members of the Guyana Police Force Martial Arts Academy (GPFMA) in a bid to provide the requisite official accreditation for the burgeoning disciplined service program. This was disclosed by a statement from the federation. According to the correspondence, “The Guyana Martial Arts Federation met with members of the Guyana Police Force Martial Arts Academy to provide the necessary accreditation to be officially recognized internationally for Mixed Martial Arts in Guyana.”

    Present at the forum were Assistant Commissioner Clifton Hickens (Ag), GPFMA President, Sergeant Latayo Collins; GPFMA Coach, Troy Bobb; GMMFA President, Gavin Singh; Vice-President, Troy Phillips; and Sherwin Sandy, Executive Member (Marketing).


    THERE'S MORE TO THIS STORY. TO UNLOCK:
    Not going to bother to unlock the rest of the story. If any of the rest of you care to, please be my guest.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #97
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    Jiu-jitsu training for police in New Jersey

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  8. #98
    My thought is that Law enforcement needs a handfull (8 or 9, less than a dozen) of takedown techniques that an be applies from a large number of angles and are easy to get into position for.

    There are a number of DVDs out there that address this very subject.

    I found one years ago (cant remember the name), by some big name law enforcement trainer who summed it up into such a small system that any school can integrate it into their program.

    To summ it up

    1. Less is more. Less than that is even more.
    2. Simple, high percentage techniques. Must work almost all the time on anyone.
    3. Entire system can be taught in a 3 day all day training course and be functional at the end.

  9. #99
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    BJJ police training

    An ex-ISU cop says martial arts training could lead to fewer mistakes on the job
    WGLT | By Sarah Nardi
    Published July 12, 2022 at 4:06 PM CDT

    Courtesy
    /
    Jeremy Butler conducting a demonstration.
    Jeremy Butler grew up on the south side of Chicago. As a young Black man, he didn’t have entirely positive perceptions of the police. But as an undergrad at Illinois State University, Butler met Aaron Woodruff, the chief of ISU police department.

    “We just had several conversations about the field of policing. And he felt that I would be a good fit for law enforcement,” Butler said of Woodruff. “So he essentially talked me into the idea of just considering it. And after a couple of conversations with him, I found myself at the police academy.”

    Butler said he and Woodruff discussed the need for more representation in law enforcement to address frayed relations between minority communities and the police. After graduating from the police academy, Butler served for seven years on the ISU police force before leaving the field to pursue a Ph.D. in kinesiology.

    Butler is now a professor at Judson University in Elgin. He’s combining his knowledge of kinesiology and policing with more than 20 years of martial arts experience to develop more effective control tactics for law enforcement. He has recently published a book called, "Stop Resisting: The Law Enforcement Officer's Guide to Proven Control Tactics, Less Lawsuits, and Building Community Trust Through Martial Arts."

    Butler said police training often treats verbal de-escalation and physical control tactics as separate subjects. In Butler’s view, the two go hand-in-hand. Describing interactions between citizens and police that devolve into physical contact, Butler said, “I always felt that most of these encounters are going to start with the verbal interaction, and then they could go south. And now you have to get physical. So, why not teach that together?”

    Butler sees the confidence and discipline that can be developed through martial arts as a way to counteract the inherently chaotic interactions police encounter on the streets.

    “Oftentimes, we forget that police officers are human,” Butler said. "And, you know, mistakes happen when you when situations are tense and rapidly evolving.”

    But by bolstering police training with time on the mats in a martial arts gym, Butler believes officers can better prepare themselves for unpredictable situations.

    “As a professional, you have a responsibility to ensure that you're training sufficiently to prepare yourself for these situations so that we can minimize the frequency of these errors occurring,” he said.

    Butler will be in Bloomington on July 23 to lead a seminar for law enforcement on Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.
    'Less Lawsuits'
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  10. #100
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    Oz & PRC

    Guns and Kung Fu: Australia and China help militarize the Solomon Islands’ police force
    Police received new rifles, water cannons, and martial arts training
    Written by
    Mong Palatino
    Posted 10 November 2022 13:59 GMT


    Australia donated 13 vehicles and 60 short barrel rifles to the Solomon Islands police. Photo from press statement published on the website of the Solomon Islands government
    As global superpowers vie for influence in the Pacific, the various types of assistance given by Australia and China to the Solomon Islands police have elicited questions and concern about their long-term geopolitical impact. Some citizens are worried that the trend toward “militarization” could turn the Solomon Islands into a “gun state.”

    Under the Manasseh Sogavare government, the Solomon Islands broke diplomatic ties with Taiwan in 2019. Since then, China has boosted its aid and investments in the archipelago as it vowed to foster closer ties with the Solomon Islands.

    Early this year, a leaked security pact between the two countries raised alarm about its destabilizing impact in the region. Solomon Islands Prime Minister Sogavare has repeatedly denied that the security partnership will lead to the installation of a Chinese military base in the islands. He insisted that China only offered to help in the training of the local police force.

    Solomon Islands sent police officers to China to undergo training, which involved the teaching of martial arts. This was reported by Global Times, a state-run news website. Zhang Guangbao, who is the leader of the China Police Liaison Team to the Solomon Islands, described the martial arts training:

    We combined martial arts and grappling, and our local colleagues were very interested in it, because they of course all know Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan. We taught them martial arts moves which they had never seen before.

    China also sent replica guns to the Solomon Islands as part of its training assistance.

    During the first week of November, the Solomon Islands received numerous police donations from Australia and China. Australia donated 60 Daniel’s Defense MK18 short Barrel Rifles and 13 police vehicles. Two days later, China donated 20 police vehicles, 30 motorcycles and two water cannon vehicles. China even presented a martial arts demonstration during the handover ceremony:

    Opposition leader Matthew Wale noted that Australia and China are trying to outcompete each other through the militaristic donations:

    He believes this does not benefit the country in the long run:

    It is clear Australia is anxious that if they do not supply guns then China will. Geopolitical interests has surpassed national interest in this country and it is a sad state of affairs.

    Prime Minister Sogavare argued the donations will enhance the capacity of the police:

    To those who view the enhancement of our Police Force, in a negative lens, I wish to appeal to you, to note that it is the responsibility of the [police] to serve and protect the lives, welfare, liberty and property of all individuals in this country. To be unable to deliver on this mandate is a poor indication of a country’s own security capacity, as a Sovereign and Independent Country. We must have that capacity and not depend on others.

    He added that a strong police force will be able to protect the country from threats:

    Law and order is an enabler for development, and it is important that as a Sovereign State, we are able to better protect ourselves, deliver on our security mandates, and confront threats when it looms.

    Some disagreed. Journalist Robert Iroga urged the government to focus on other aspects of governance as he warned against the possible negative consequences of arming the police with assault weapons:

    It is not the power of one’s guns that determine a good government. Rather, it is the ability of a government to deliver opportunities and better livelihood to its people.

    Perhaps for donors, Solomon Islands is a pawn in the broader geopolitical competition: one provides Kung Fu training and replica guns and the other tries out-compete with real assault weapons. In these times of hyper-geopolitical competition, the arming of police forces with assault weapons could result in dangerous outcomes in the future.
    Journalist Dorothy Wickham said the donation will entail additional expenses for the government:

    She is also worried about how the intense rivalry in the Pacific could turn her country into a “gun state”:
    There a several embedded tweets in the original article that I didn't bother to cut&paste.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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