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Thread: Here's your Halloween treat: Chinese Ghost Stories.

  1. #1

    Here's your Halloween treat: Chinese Ghost Stories.

    Chinese Ghost Stories from Project Gutenberg (the land of free E-books). Download and enjoy: http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16261...-h/16261-h.htm

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Trick or Treat?

    Saw this in the store the other day at the gas station. It kind of freaked me out.


    Blood Energy Potion is the world’s only blood substitute.This blend contains the protein, electrolytes and enzymes you thirst for in a delicious fruit-punch flavor.

    Blood Energy Potion comes in a resealable pouch that looks just like an IV (intravenous) drip bag.

    Blood Energy Potion has the same colour, consistency, and texture as real blood, but tastes like fruit punch. It also contains the same nutrients as real blood, including iron, protein, and electrolytes. The energy “hit” you get from drinking it starts within 10-15 minutes, and lasts for 4 hours.

    Blood Energy Potion is not for consumption by children under the age of 12 or pregnant women. It contains phenylalanine and should not be consumed by those with phenylketonuria.

    Blood Energy Potion is a caffeinated energy drink it is the same color and consistency of real blood. It has many of the same nutrients of the rubicund liquid we love to consume (iron, protein, electrolytes, and caffeine) and has a delectable fruit punch flavor.

    Blood Energy Potion is great for the undead who need a little pick me up, without wanting to give away their "condition". And it comes in resealable, transfusion-style pouches to remind us of the real substance we all lust for!
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  4. #4
    kind of know all the chinese ghost tales already.

    Japanese has some of the weirdest ghost stories around.

    shudder


  5. #5
    2 favorite ghosts/spirits of mine

    1. spider spirits or black widow spider. the spider may mate with you but she eats you alive afterward. she sucks your human spirits.

    animal spirits-> human spiritis-> god spiritis/fairy

    one has to do good deeds to be promoted to next realm (buddhism)

    or demoted in the next life/cycle.

    2. fox spirits or hu li jing, she is very attractive and rich. one has to be strong to protect her and guard her riches. if you are weak or not rich, she leaves you in a flash.

    ---

    some fairy or ghost tales are featured in the journey to the west or xi you ji.


  6. #6
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    Trick or Treat

    One of these is a trick, the other a treat. You guess.

    #1: Click here.

    #2: Eat this.
    Burger King's Halloween Burger Does Something Scary To Your Poop
    October 6, 2015 | by Tom Hale


    Photo credit: photo credit: Burger King

    Inspired by its notorious Japanese menu, Burger King has released a black-bunned "Halloween Whopper" for sale in the U.S., Spain and the U.K. during the month of October. However, what is most scary about the burger is the "trick or treat" it pulls on your bowels.

    The Whopper has been giving those brave enough to eat it green poop. As such, the online collective conscious of Twitter has reacted with the hashtag #greenpoop and, no surprises, it's trending on both Twitter and Facebook.

    The black-bunned Whopper has been around in Japan for almost a year, yet no green poop has been reported there. Perhaps it's because the Japanese black buns were made with squid ink, whilst their Western counterparts are made with artificial food dye. Or maybe it’s just the spooky spirit of Halloween.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #7
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    This is horrific

    It would make a good horror film plot. But sadly, terrifyingly, it's news.



    Murdered Mentally Disabled Sold As Ghost Wedding Brides
    The body of one of the murdered women fetched around $5,260.
    Colum Murphy

    Aug 23, 2016

    Police in northwestern China have charged a man with murdering two mentally disabled women and selling their corpses for use in “ghost” weddings.

    The custom of marrying a couple, one of whom, or both, are deceased has been practised in China for centuries. They are carried out, for example, either to bring an unmarried, living woman into the lineage of a deceased man’s family, or to join two dead individuals in perpetual matrimony after death. Such weddings also are arranged to comfort unmarried spirits that might otherwise haunt the family of the deceased.

    Weddings involving dead people have long been a thorn in the side of the Chinese government. Mao Zedong targeted the practice in his drive to rid the country of unscientific and superstitious customs. The sale of corpses was made illegal in 2006. In spite of the ban, the practice continues to this day, particularly in rural areas of China’s northern and northwestern regions.

    In this latest case, a traffic policeman discovered the body of a woman in a van near the city of Yanan, in the northwestern Chinese province of Shaanxi, on April 13. This led to the discovery of another murder involving the same perpetrator. In both cases, the women were killed in Gansu province and their bodies transported to the neighboring province of Shaanxi.

    Since then, two other people in addition to the murderer have been charged with crimes related to the deaths of the two women, including concealing the murder and trafficking women.

    According to a report issued Monday by the police in Yulin City, Shaanxi, the main suspect in the case, a man surnamed Ma from Gansu, was an acquaintance of the mother of the first victim, a mentally disabled woman identified only by her family name Liu. The police in the city could not be reached for comment on Tuesday morning.

    According to the report, the suspect Ma told Liu’s mother he would he would find her daughter a marriage partner, and invited Liu out of her home on this pretext. Once he was alone with Liu, Ma injected his victim with heavy sedatives, and Liu died from an overdose, according to the police report.

    Ma then paid a man surnamed Yang to transport Liu’s body in his van from Gansu to Yulin. There they met with a resident surnamed Qiu, who acted as an agent, introducing Ma to potential buyers of Liu’s corpse. Ma received 35,000 yuan ($5,263) for the body. For his part as middleman, Qiu received 5,000 yuan. It was not immediately clear how much Yang the driver was paid for his role.

    Three months later, Ma was up to his murderous ways again, the report suggests. With the help of two accomplices, he identified another potential victim in a disabled woman surnamed An. Her murder followed an almost identical pattern to Liu’s, right down to the lethal injection. Once again, Ma enlisted Yang’s services with the same destination in mind — Yulin, where arrangements had been made for the corpse to “marry” the son of a resident surnamed Chen, according to the police.

    But the corpse never made it to its final destination, as Yang was intercepted en route by traffic police.

    Ma has been charged with homicide and trafficking of women, while Yang has been charged with concealing the murder. One person involved in An’s abduction has also been arrested for trafficking women.

    Additional reporting by Yin Yijun. With contributions from Owen Churchill.

    (Header image: A ghost wedding ceremony for two dead teenagers is held in Yuncheng, Shanxi province, May 6, 2016. The groom was beaten to death by a group of boys; the body of the bride was purchased by his family. Chen Wei/VCG)
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    Ghost story in the making

    Man found dead inside Hong Kong haunted house, killed by coffin
    BY SHANGHAIIST IN NEWS ON SEP 18, 2017 8:50 PM



    Hong Kong's Ocean Park has closed a Halloween-themed haunted house attraction after a man died on Saturday afternoon from injuries that he sustained after stumbling into a restricted area of the ride.
    The 21-year-old man surnamed Cheung was found unconscious behind the scenes of a seasonal spooky attraction called "Buried Alive." According to the park's website, visitors who dared enter the attraction would "experience being buried alive alone, before fighting their way out of their dark and eerie grave." To go down into the attraction, guests would hop into a coffin-shaped vehicle and slide downwards into the dark, experiencing the horrors within by themselves.



    According to a park spokesperson, Cheung mistakenly ventured into the backstage area of the attraction that is reserved for maintenance staff only. There, he was hit in the head by a moving part of the slide, one of the mechanical coffins.
    After being found, Cheung was rushed to the hospital where he was confirmed dead.
    According to a preliminary investigation, the accident did not involve any instance of mechanical failure.



    Ocean Park has offered their deepest condolences to the victim and his family and have promised to attempt to compensate their loss.
    The haunted house attraction opened in 2001 and this is the first time that a fatal accident has occurred there. Ocean Park has closed the attraction while an investigation is carried out into the incident.
    By Máté Mohos
    [Images via HK01.com]
    A Chinese Ghost Story set up at a theme park ride. The FEAR is high for Halloween 2017.
    Gene Ching
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    The Weird History of A Chinese Ghost Story Franchise: Horror Comedy at its Wildest

    My latest feature for Den of Geek: The Weird History of A Chinese Ghost Story Franchise: Horror Comedy at its Wildest



    I'm disappointed that there's no Chinese Ghost Story threads on the original trilogy, but we can hijack this one. My feature goes into that trilogy, the 2011 film and much more.

    There's this Here-s-your-Halloween-treat-Chinese-Ghost-Stories so I'll copy this there too
    Gene Ching
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  10. #10
    Ghost stories always creep me out and weird me out. Those are always interesting to watch.

  11. #11
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    Chinese ghost stories/movies have never creeped me out.

    Now, some of the Japanese ghost movies from several years ago were pretty creepy.

    I’ve seen only one Korean horror movie that I thought had some creepy parts. Gonjiam: Haunted Asylum (2018) is a ‘found-footage’ film about a group of ‘paranormal investigators’ who are live-streaming their investigation into an abandoned asylum. For a ‘found-footage’ film, it’s actually pretty good, though I hated the first 20 minutes or so. And the very end became a bit over-the-top. But there are some parts that are very well-done, and the acting is very convincing.

    But in real life, “ghosts” don’t creep me out much. Having had ‘paranormal’ experiences off and on since age 4, I just accept that there are beings all around us, all the time, that we can’t normally perceive. Ironically, the only two experiences I would label as “creepy” occurred during the decade I lived in Taiwan, and others experienced them with me. Admittedly, those two experiences creeped me out a bit, but they didn’t freak me out. All of my other ‘paranormal’ experiences (both here and in Taiwan) have been either very positive, or at least not negative.

    “Ghosts” is kind of a catch-all word. I’m not even sure that all of them were ghosts anyway, and not some other types of nonphysical beings. Are they all spirits of dead people, or something(s) else? Are some of them just physical people like ourselves living in another frequency, and we occasionally become aware of each other during brief bleed-throughs, like when one radio station interferes with another? Who knows. I’ve never panicked or freaked out, even during the two “creepy” experiences I had. If something has a negative or predatory intent; if you feed into it and freak out, it will mess with you more. If you DON’T freak out and DON’T feed them with your fear, they will go away (at least in my experience).

    I’m always amused with all the ghost hunter/paranormal investigation groups in vogue now. The ones on TV almost always freak out or geek out whenever something happens (or they THINK something is happening), like they’ve never experienced anything before, or didn’t believe in the first place, even if they’ve done hundreds of investigations. Or maybe they’re acting that way for the cameras. If they’re too afraid of what they might find, why are they even investigating in the first place? I’m honestly not being a ‘couch expert’, or even an expert at all. There are no real paranormal experts. But as someone who has had, and continues to have experiences (which doesn’t make me ‘special’), it’s just a part of nature that most people are simply not aware of; nothing more and nothing less.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 11-05-2020 at 10:21 AM.

  12. #12
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    I binged Truth Seekers over Halloween



    I enjoyed it but I'm biased. I'm a big fan of Nick Frost after meeting him on Into the Badlands.
    Gene Ching
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