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Thread: Vegetarian

  1. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by mickey View Post
    Three weeks???

    Be careful that it is the soy and not sodium.

    mickey
    Thank you, will watch out for sodium. I am also at a calorie deficit eating mainly salads, seem to be mainly burning up muscle for calories alongside fat.

    Honorary African American
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat The Lost Art of Anal Destruction™®LLC .
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  2. #242
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    "hybrid" burgers

    JUN 15, 9:30 AM EDT
    byFRANK LANDYMORE
    DEAD MEAT
    FAKE MEAT STARTUP SHUTS DOWN WITHOUT SELLING A SINGLE FAKE MEAT TO A RESTAURANT OR GROCERY STORE
    ALL SIZZLE, NO STEAK.
    SCIFI FOODS
    Butchered Prospects
    It seems the lab-grown meat industry just hasn't managed to serve up something people want to sink their teeth into.
    In a development that augurs ill for the burgeoning food sector, SFGate reports that a Bay Area-based startup called SCiFi Foods, which had dreams of bringing "hybrid" burgers made of a mix of plants and lab-grown beef to the masses, is shutting down just six months after it had announced the completion of its first meat-growing facility.
    In a LinkedIn post on Tuesday, the company's co-founders Joshua March and Kasia Gora painfully admitted that SCiFi failed to bring a single meat product to market. Or in other words, not one of their Franken-patties ever managed to grace stores and restaurants.
    "Unfortunately, in this funding environment, we could not raise the capital that we needed to commercialize the SCiFi burger, and SCiFi Foods ran out of time," they wrote.
    The company's struggle, March and Gora added, "reflects the challenges that the cultivated meat and general meat alternative markets are facing today."

    Sausage Making
    As icky as the idea sounds to some people, lab-grown or "cultivated" meat promises to solve a lot of ethical quandaries. No animals would be harmed in making it. And if the bioreactors to cultivate it became efficient enough, it would also spare us the guilt associated with the harrowing environmental toll of the meat industry.
    Proponents also argued that, in a future that foregoes slaying animals for food, it would make for a much more palatable alternative than plant-based ones, as many people are unwilling to entirely give up meat.
    But a lot of practical hurdles stand in the way, with the exorbitant costs associated with growing the meat being the biggest. When the venture first started out in 2019, a single SCiFi burger cost $20,000 to create, the cofounders said. Over five years, the company's scientists were only able to bring that down to a still eye-watering — but perhaps no more mouth-watering — $15,000.

    Rotten Luck
    Few could predict just how volatile a political issue ersatz meat would turn out to be, however. Along with waning enthusiasm for the industry, the cofounders said, they also blame the hostile "culture wars" in the US for their failures — and it's not hard to understand why.
    Last month, Florida Governor Ron Desantis outright banned the lab-grown meat industry from the state, no doubt inflaming public opinion on the matter across the country. Just two weeks later Alabama followed suit and also enacted a ban.
    At least on a federal level, regulators appear more equitable. Last year, the US Department of Agriculture approved two companies, Upside Foods and Good Meat, to sell cultivated chicken products, in a breakthrough for the industry.
    But since then, Upside Foods, considered a leader among meat-fakers, has been hampered with setbacks and scandals, including a pause on expanding its facilities and scrutiny over allegedly misleading the public on how its cultivated chicken is made. And now, if SCiFi's fate is any indication, the forecast is ever grimmer.
    Would I have tried these? Probably.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #243
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    La Vie

    Plant-based brand La Vie unveils UK out-of-home takeover with ‘cheeky’ new posters
    BRANDS CREATIVE AND CAMPAIGNS MARKETING STRATEGY NEWS
    26th October 2022
    Conor Nichols
    French plant-based bacon brand La Vie has launched a new out-of-home (OOH) campaign in the build-up to World Vegan Day on 1 November.

    The pink billboards, described as ‘bold, bright and mischievous’, promote a brand that has only been on the UK market for a couple of weeks and is now available in 2,000 locations across the nation.

    The news comes just a month after the Paris-based challenger brand launched its first UK promotional campaign, despite the fact that it was not available in the British market at the time.

    The new billboards include phrases like ‘Britain’s newest best faker – sorry Boris’, and ‘sure, our parents got the property boom, but we’ve got vegan bacon that tastes like bacon’.



    The brand’s campaign intends to set itself apart from traditional advertising competitors by embracing controversy and finding humorous ways to connect with consumers.

    La Vie is not only backed by Natalie Portman, but also includes products that have been tried and tested over 5,000 times in order to perfect and create a ‘world-class’ substitute ‘indistinguishable’ from pork.

    “La Vie™ has a wildly different tone and personality to other brands in the meat-free space,” La Vie chief marketing officer, Romain Jolivet, said.

    “Since the beginning, we have been very intentional with how we wanted the brand to be perceived, and how we could expand on that in different markets. We have always been confident in our marketing approach, knowing it sets us aside, but now, seeing the response from the British population, has given us the courage to be even more creative, and continue to build our brand as we expand globally.”

    Well if it's good enough for Natalie Portman, I'll try it.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #244
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    I don't think vegetarianism will ever become mainstream overthere becausase it requires sustained empathy that overcomes desire for pleasure, and pleasure overrides all in their societal values, its basically a sacred cow.

    Honorary African American
    grandmaster instructor of Wombat Combat The Lost Art of Anal Destruction™®LLC .
    Senior Business Director at TEAM ASSHAMMER consulting services ™®LLC

  5. #245
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    McPlant

    McDonald’s plant-based burger fizzles out — even in San Francisco, company says

    An advertisement for the McPlant, a plant-based vegetarian alternative to the more traditional McDonald’s meat burgers, in London in 2022. (Mike Kemp / In Pictures via Getty Images)
    By Hannah Fry
    Staff Writer
    June 26, 2024 4:49 PM PT

    McDonald’s had high hopes for its signature plant-based burger when it rolled out in California and Texas two years ago, but it turns out customers just weren’t lovin’ it.

    Joe Erlinger, the president of McDonald’s USA, said during this week’s Wall Street Journal Global Food Forum that the meatless burger had fizzled rather than sizzled. The McPlant, he put it bluntly, “was not successful” in the San Francisco Bay Area or Dallas.

    Consumers in the United States aren’t “looking for McPlant or other plant-based proteins from McDonald’s now,” Erlinger said Wednesday. “It’s a trend that we’ll continue to monitor.”

    At the heart of McPlant was a patty co-developed with Beyond Meat, which featured vegetarian ingredients like peas, rice and potatoes.

    The plant patties cropped up in eight McDonald’s across the country in late 2021, including locations in El Segundo and Manhattan Beach. By January 2022, 600 restaurants across the Bay Area and Dallas-Fort Worth metropolitan area were slinging the meat-free sandwiches.

    At the time, the fast-food giant tempted customers by suggesting they take a road trip to try the McPlant — available only “for a limited time, while supplies last,” the company wrote in a news release.

    But an analysis done in March 2022 by the research firm BTIG indicated demand had withered, with consumers underwhelmed by the culinary creation.

    Restaurants in the Bay Area and Dallas-Fort Worth were selling 20 McPlants per day, fewer than the 40 to 60 they had expected. Only three to five sandwiches per day were being sold in more rural east Texas, Marketwatch reported at the time.

    That July, the company ended the meatless burger’s test run without disclosing plans for a nationwide rollout. The desire for meat alternatives climbed rapidly between 2019 and 2021 in the United States, but lessened in 2022 and declined in 2023, according to the Good Food Institute, a nonprofit that promotes alternatives to animal proteins.

    That’s not necessarily the case across the Atlantic, however, where McDonald’s plant-based offerings have apparently found greener pastures. In European markets, you can find the McPlant patty on a sesame bun with lettuce, tomato, ketchup, mustard, vegan sandwich sauce, vegan cheese, pickles and onions.

    Erlinger said the company is focusing in the U.S. on chicken options, which are more popular with consumers.
    Fast-Food-Nastiness
    Vegetarian
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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