Page 5 of 5 FirstFirst ... 345
Results 61 to 72 of 72

Thread: The Academy Awards

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    And the nominees are...

    THE 93RD ACADEMY AWARDS | 2021
    Union Station Los Angeles and the Dolby Theatre at the Hollywood & Highland Center
    Sunday, April 25, 2021
    Honoring movies released in 2020

    ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    RIZ AHMED
    Sound of Metal
    CHADWICK BOSEMAN
    Ma Rainey's Black Bottom
    ANTHONY HOPKINS
    The Father
    GARY OLDMAN
    Mank
    STEVEN YEUN
    Minari

    ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    SACHA BARON COHEN
    The Trial of the Chicago 7
    DANIEL KALUUYA
    Judas and the Black Messiah
    LESLIE ODOM, JR.
    One Night in Miami...
    PAUL RACI
    Sound of Metal
    LAKEITH STANFIELD
    Judas and the Black Messiah

    ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    VIOLA DAVIS
    Ma Rainey's Black Bottom
    ANDRA DAY
    The United States vs. Billie Holiday
    VANESSA KIRBY
    Pieces of a Woman
    FRANCES MCDORMAND
    Nomadland
    CAREY MULLIGAN
    Promising Young Woman

    ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    MARIA BAKALOVA
    Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
    GLENN CLOSE
    Hillbilly Elegy
    OLIVIA COLMAN
    The Father
    AMANDA SEYFRIED
    Mank
    YUH-JUNG YOUN
    Minari

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    ONWARD
    Dan Scanlon and Kori Rae
    OVER THE MOON
    Glen Keane, Gennie Rim and Peilin Chou
    A SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE: FARMAGEDDON
    Richard Phelan, Will Becher and Paul Kewley
    SOUL
    Pete Docter and Dana Murray
    WOLFWALKERS
    Tomm Moore, Ross Stewart, Paul Young and Stéphan Roelants

    CINEMATOGRAPHY
    NOMINEES
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Sean Bobbitt
    MANK
    Erik Messerschmidt
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Dariusz Wolski
    NOMADLAND
    Joshua James Richards
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Phedon Papamichael

    COSTUME DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    EMMA
    Alexandra Byrne
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Ann Roth
    MANK
    Trish Summerville
    MULAN
    Bina Daigeler
    PINOCCHIO
    Massimo Cantini Parrini

    DIRECTING
    NOMINEES
    ANOTHER ROUND
    Thomas Vinterberg
    MANK
    David Fincher
    MINARI
    Lee Isaac Chung
    NOMADLAND
    Chloé Zhao
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Emerald Fennell

    DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
    NOMINEES
    COLLECTIVE
    Alexander Nanau and Bianca Oana
    CRIP CAMP
    Nicole Newnham, Jim LeBrecht and Sara Bolder
    THE MOLE AGENT
    Maite Alberdi and Marcela Santibáñez
    MY OCTOPUS TEACHER
    Pippa Ehrlich, James Reed and Craig Foster
    TIME
    Garrett Bradley, Lauren Domino and Kellen Quinn

    DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)
    NOMINEES
    COLETTE
    Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard
    A CONCERTO IS A CONVERSATION
    Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers
    DO NOT SPLIT
    Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook
    HUNGER WARD
    Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman
    A LOVE SONG FOR LATASHA
    Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan

    FILM EDITING
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    Yorgos Lamprinos
    NOMADLAND
    Chloé Zhao
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Frédéric Thoraval
    SOUND OF METAL
    Mikkel E. G. Nielsen
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Alan Baumgarten

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    ANOTHER ROUND
    Denmark
    BETTER DAYS
    Hong Kong
    COLLECTIVE
    Romania
    THE MAN WHO SOLD HIS SKIN
    Tunisia
    QUO VADIS, AIDA?
    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
    NOMINEES
    EMMA
    Marese Langan, Laura Allen and Claudia Stolze
    HILLBILLY ELEGY
    Eryn Krueger Mekash, Matthew Mungle and Patricia Dehaney
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson
    MANK
    Gigi Williams, Kimberley Spiteri and Colleen LaBaff
    PINOCCHIO
    Mark Coulier, Dalia Colli and Francesco Pegoretti

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
    NOMINEES
    DA 5 BLOODS
    Terence Blanchard
    MANK
    Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
    MINARI
    Emile Mosseri
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    James Newton Howard
    SOUL
    Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
    NOMINEES
    FIGHT FOR YOU
    from Judas and the Black Messiah; Music by H.E.R. and Dernst Emile II; Lyric by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas
    HEAR MY VOICE
    from The Trial of the Chicago 7; Music by Daniel Pemberton; Lyric by Daniel Pemberton and Celeste Waite
    HUSAVIK
    from Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga; Music and Lyric by Savan Kotecha, Fat Max Gsus and Rickard Göransson
    IO SÌ (SEEN)
    from The Life Ahead (La Vita Davanti a Se); Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Diane Warren and Laura Pausini
    SPEAK NOW
    from One Night in Miami...; Music and Lyric by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth

    BEST PICTURE
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    David Parfitt, Jean-Louis Livi and Philippe Carcassonne, Producers
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Shaka King, Charles D. King and Ryan Coogler, Producers
    MANK
    Ceán Chaffin, Eric Roth and Douglas Urbanski, Producers
    MINARI
    Christina Oh, Producer
    NOMADLAND
    Frances McDormand, Peter Spears, Mollye Asher, Dan Janvey and Chloé Zhao, Producers
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Ben Browning, Ashley Fox, Emerald Fennell and Josey McNamara, Producers
    SOUND OF METAL
    Bert Hamelinck and Sacha Ben Harroche, Producers
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Marc Platt and Stuart Besser, Producers

    PRODUCTION DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    Production Design: Peter Francis; Set Decoration: Cathy Featherstone
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Production Design: Mark Ricker; Set Decoration: Karen O'Hara and Diana Stoughton
    MANK
    Production Design: Donald Graham Burt; Set Decoration: Jan Pascale
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Production Design: David Crank; Set Decoration: Elizabeth Keenan
    TENET
    Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

    SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)
    NOMINEES
    BURROW
    Madeline Sharafian and Michael Capbarat
    GENIUS LOCI
    Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise
    IF ANYTHING HAPPENS I LOVE YOU
    Will McCormack and Michael Govier
    OPERA
    Erick Oh
    YES-PEOPLE
    Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson

    SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)
    NOMINEES
    FEELING THROUGH
    Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski
    THE LETTER ROOM
    Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan
    THE PRESENT
    Farah Nabulsi
    TWO DISTANT STRANGERS
    Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe
    WHITE EYE
    Tomer Shushan and Shira Hochman

    SOUND
    NOMINEES
    GREYHOUND
    Warren Shaw, Michael Minkler, Beau Borders and David Wyman
    MANK
    Ren Klyce, Jeremy Molod, David Parker, Nathan Nance and Drew Kunin
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Oliver Tarney, Mike Prestwood Smith, William Miller and John Pritchett
    SOUL
    Ren Klyce, Coya Elliott and David Parker
    SOUND OF METAL
    Nicolas Becker, Jaime Baksht, Michelle Couttolenc, Carlos Cortés and Phillip Bladh

    VISUAL EFFECTS
    NOMINEES
    LOVE AND MONSTERS
    Matt Sloan, Genevieve Camilleri, Matt Everitt and Brian Cox
    THE MIDNIGHT SKY
    Matthew Kasmir, Christopher Lawrence, Max Solomon and David Watkins
    MULAN
    Sean Faden, Anders Langlands, Seth Maury and Steve Ingram
    THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN
    Nick Davis, Greg Fisher, Ben Jones and Santiago Colomo Martinez
    TENET
    Andrew Jackson, David Lee, Andrew Lockley and Scott Fisher

    WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    BORAT SUBSEQUENT MOVIEFILM: DELIVERY OF PRODIGIOUS BRIBE TO AMERICAN REGIME FOR MAKE BENEFIT ONCE GLORIOUS NATION OF KAZAKHSTAN
    Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Peter Baynham & Erica Rivinoja & Dan Mazer & Jena Friedman & Lee Kern; Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Nina Pedrad
    THE FATHER
    Screenplay by Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller
    NOMADLAND
    Written for the screen by Chloé Zhao
    ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI...
    Screenplay by Kemp Powers
    THE WHITE TIGER
    Written for the screen by Ramin Bahrani

    WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Screenplay by Will Berson & Shaka King; Story by Will Berson & Shaka King and Kenny Lucas & Keith Lucas
    MINARI
    Written by Lee Isaac Chung
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Written by Emerald Fennell
    SOUND OF METAL
    Screenplay by Darius Marder & Abraham Marder; Story by Darius Marder & Derek Cianfrance
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Written by Aaron Sorkin
    The only one we've discussed at length here was Mulan. We have threads for Tenet and Promising Young Woman but I think that's it, right?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    Do Not Split

    Mar 17, 2021 3:03am PT
    China Tells Media to Stagger Oscars Telecast, Downplay Event (Report)

    By Patrick Frater


    Field of Vision
    The Chinese government has reportedly told its local media channels not to transmit live coverage of the Oscars and to downplay the awards ceremony. The move follows the nomination of “Do Not Split,” a 35-minute chronicle of the pro-democracy struggles in Hong Kong, in the documentary short subject category.

    The order reportedly came from the propaganda department of the Chinese Communist Party and instructed Chinese media to only report on non-controversial awards.

    Such instructions are not intended for publication or dissemination overseas and are difficult to verify. The matter was first reported by Hong Kong’s Apple Daily and Radio Free Asia, and subsequently also by Bloomberg.

    Directed by Norway’s Anders Hammer and produced by Hammer and Charlotte Cook for Field of Vision, the 35-minute film shows footage of the 2019 street protests in Hong Kong against the city government’s planned extradition law. Two marches in June 2019 were reported as attracting one million and two million participants, respectively, from a population of 7.5 million.



    Field of Vision is a company under the First Look Media umbrella, along with The Intercept, Topic Studios and the Press Freedom Defense Fund. “Do Not Split” is the company’s third Oscar nomination after “In The Absence” (2020) and “A Night at the Garden” (2019).

    The film follows the increase in physical violence and growing desperation by the pro-democracy camp after the extradition law was abandoned, only to be replaced in June 2020 with a Beijing-imposed National Security Law. It also discusses the erosion of rights of freedom of expression and the media.

    Oscar nominations were announced on Monday this week. The winners will be revealed at a ceremony in Los Angeles on April 26.

    The gag order illustrates how politics are complicating almost every aspect of entertainment, culture and the arts in mainland China and former British colony Hong Kong.

    The Oscar nominations contained two other pieces of news that might otherwise have been cheered by Chinese authorities: six nominations, including best film, for “Nomadland” by Chinese-born director Chloe Zhao; and the nomination of Hong Kong’s representative “Better Days,” in the best international feature category.

    Since Zhao’s Golden Globe directing prize win in February, “Nomadland” has sparked a storm of controversy in China. State media and social media alike initially blazed with pride and sought to claim Zhao’s historic success for China. But within days, social media users unearthed two previous interviews given by Zhao to foreign news outlets.

    In the first, Zhao told the Australian website news.com.au that “the U.S. is now my country.” Zhao’s last three films have been U.S. productions and Chinese netizens took her comments to mean that Zhao may no longer hold a Chinese passport. That section of the interview was online in December 2020, but had been deleted some time before Feb. 16, 2021.

    The second interview appeared in New York-based Filmmaker Magazine in 2013. Explaining why she chose to make a film (2015 drama “Songs My Brothers Taught Me”) about a Native American teen on a North Dakota reservation, Zhao said: “It goes back to when I was a teenager in China, being in a place where there are lies everywhere.” She added: “You felt like you were never going to be able to get out.

    “A lot of info I received when I was younger was not true, and I became very rebellious toward my family and my background,” said the director. The comments had been removed from the magazine’s website by Feb. 15, 2021.

    “Nomadland” has been penciled in for an April 23 release in China. But it’s no longer certain that it will go ahead.

    The trajectory of “Better Days” is less controversial, but just as twisty.

    Directed by Hong Kong-based director Derek Tsang, the film is a mainland China-set melodrama that mixes up a school bullying tale with a story of mismatched love. It was set to have its world premiere in February 2019 at the Berlin Film Festival, but at the last minute it was withdrawn by its production team, amid messages of regret from Tsang. No meaningful explanation was ever advanced, but it seems likely that the gutsy telling of disaffected youth caused Chinese authorities to rethink the permission given for it to screen overseas.

    After a couple more false starts, “Better Days” was allowed to release in Chinese theaters, where it proved to be a smash hit, earning RMB1.55 billion ($238 million).

    That does not mean authorities were cool with the film. Mainland China favored an overtly patriotic sports drama “Leap” as its Oscar contender. That left Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Area belonging to China, to select “Better Days.”

    In recent days, arts and culture have become the center of another storm in Hong Kong, where pro-Beijing forces are politically ascendant.

    On Monday, under pressure from Beijing-loyal newspapers, cinemas and arts centers in Hong Kong canceled planned commercial screenings of “Inside the Red Brick Wall,” another award-winning documentary about the pro-democracy protest movement. It was accused of breaching the National Security Law by stirring up hatred for the Hong Kong police and for China.

    On Wednesday, it was the turn of broadcaster RTHK and the West Kowloon Cultural District’s museums to be attacked by Beijing supporters.

    New People’s Party lawmaker Eunice Yung claimed that upcoming shows at the WKCD’s M+ Museum are causing great concern to many members of the public, because they are “spreading hatred” against China. “How come there will be display of art pieces that are suspected to have breached the national security law and also are an insult to the country?” Yung asked in the Legislative Council.

    Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam responded by saying that authorities will be “on full alert” to make sure museum exhibitions in Hong Kong do not undermine national security.

    “I’m sure staff are able to tell what is freedom of artistic expression and whether certain pieces are really meant to incite hatred or to destroy relations between two places (Hong Kong and mainland China) and undermine national security,” Lam said.
    threads
    The-Academy-Awards
    Hong-Kong-protests
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    And the winner is...

    It's nearly impossible to be a-political anymore, but when a doc is very political, well, we'll see what the Academy thinks tonight...

    Film on 2019 Hong Kong protests vies for Oscars, riles China
    Do Not Split does not shy away from the violence of the protests, but at its heart is the emotional toll on the young people struggling to protect the city they love.


    Do Not Split's Oscar nomination has riled China [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    By
    Kate Mayberry
    25 Apr 2021
    Growing up in Hong Kong, Joey Siu imagined she might become a secondary school teacher, but two years ago, as pro-democracy protesters filled the streets of the Chinese-ruled city, she found herself taking a different path.

    Siu joined the rallies as a student activist, but quickly took on a more prominent role in the movement, advocating for international help and speaking regularly to the media.

    Then, in June last year, China imposed the National Security Law – broadly worded legislation it said was necessary to deal with secession, terrorism, subversion and “collusion with foreign powers”.

    Overnight, social media accounts were closed, pro-democracy groups shut down. The protests, already quietened by the coronavirus pandemic, evaporated.

    Some chose exile. Siu agonised for weeks about what to do.

    “I never really thought about leaving Hong Kong this soon,” the now-21-year-old told Al Jazeera from Washington, DC, where she eventually settled in October last year. “I always thought I would have a career in Hong Kong, and a future and that it would be the city I would live in permanently.

    “[But] I realised if I chose to leave Hong Kong, I could do more for Hong Kong.”

    The tumultuous political developments in the Chinese territory, Siu’s own growth as an activist and the emotional toll on the protesters as they struggle for the city they love are at the heart of Do Not Split, the 35-minute film by Norwegian director Anders Hammer that is in contention for best short documentary at the Oscars on Sunday.

    ‘No way to defend ourselves’
    Described by Variety as “visceral, up close and personal”, Hammer went down to the streets to film alongside the protesters and capture not only the unpredictability of the protests, but their raw emotion.


    A still from Do Not Split by Anders Hammer, which has been nominated for an Academy Award [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    From its opening with a group of black-clad protesters breaking into a Chinese-owned bank, to a group of police officers pushing a protester to the ground, flattening his cheek to the tarmac, his shirt ripped off, and his belly exposed, the film does not flinch from the increasing violence of the confrontations between police and protesters.
    Throughout there are clouds of tear gas, sprays of water cannon and the putt-putt of rubber bullets.

    Siu remembers how the protesters struggled with how to deal with the police’s escalating response.

    “When the movement first broke out most of the protesters, including myself, were new,” she said. “We did not know how to deal with tear gas, rubber bullets and everything.”

    At first, the police gave the crowds the space to disperse and return home, but then their tactics changed, she remembers.

    Protesters often found themselves boxed in under volleys of tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets. Some protesters were shot with live ammunition.

    The government had also made clear those arrested could be charged with rioting, an offence punishable with a jail term of as many as 10 years.

    “There was really no way to defend ourselves, other than by also deploying a certain level of force,” Siu said.

    Emotional toll
    Hammer arrived in Hong Kong in June 2019, and – apart from a quick trip back to Norway to collect more gear – spent weeks on the ground.

    While some of the violence was disturbing – Hammer points to the standoff with police at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, which was besieged in November – it was the spirit and determination of the protesters that most affected him.

    “Seeing the stress, the desperation and how protesters were trying to still keep hope even though it was becoming more and more difficult for them to protest and they could see very clear signs that Hong Kong was developing in the opposite way than they were fighting for,” he told Al Jazeera.


    Anders Hammer on location in Hong Kong filming, Do Not Split. He decided to go onto the streets, build trust with the protesters and film alongside them [Courtesy of Oliver Haynes]
    “They wanted to protect and keep the city as they knew it and they were fighting against this closer relationship with Beijing. And they were protesting because they felt their basic democratic rights were disappearing.”
    Hammer gives space for the protesters to talk about their motivations and their sense of betrayal.

    “The British handed us over to China like a bag of potatoes,” one says of the United Kingdom, which ruled Hong Kong as a colony until 1997.

    Siu is shown wrestling with the psychological impact of the unfolding events.

    “When our own city is decayed, [and] falling apart,” she tells Hammer. “What is the point of us thinking about our future.”

    The 2019 protests began against a Hong Kong government plan to allow suspects to be sent for trial in mainland China, where the courts are controlled by the Chinese Communist Party.

    A million people marched through the streets of the city on June 9, and nearly double that the following week – the biggest protest in the territory’s history – but it was not until September that chief executive Carrie Lam finally withdrew the bill.

    ‘Dark times’
    The rallies did not emerge out of nowhere, however. Hong Kong people had long been chafing at Beijing’s tightening grip.


    At the handover, the country’s Communist Party leaders had promised to respect the territory’s rights and freedoms – unknown in the mainland – for at least 50 years.

    Before the 2019 protests, the biggest demonstration in the territory had been 16 years earlier against plans to introduce a national security law, which were then dropped by the government.

    Demands for universal suffrage – a key demand of the 2019 protests – and the right to choose the city’s leader have periodically erupted into mass demonstrations, notably in 2014 when tens of thousands joined a peaceful 79-day sit-in in the heart of the city, after Beijing declared the territory did not have autonomy.

    “I felt this was one of the most important events in international politics at the time,” Hammer said of why he decided to go to Hong Kong in 2019. “I still think it is.”

    The protests had already cooled even before the National Security Law was imposed, but critics have said the legislation has effectively criminalised even legitimate forms of political dissent.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    continued from previous post



    Protesters with a petrol bomb in a still from, Do Not Split. While Anders Hammer’s film shows the violence of the protests, he says he was most affected by the emotional and psychological stress that the protesters felt [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    In January, some 50 politicians, activists and academics were arrested in police raids over a primary election they had organised in July 2020 to help the democratic camp choose the strongest candidates for a Legislative Council election that was then delayed.

    Since then, Beijing has rewritten the rules on the territory’s elections to ensure only “patriots” can hold office.

    “I feel sorry for Hong Kong,” Hammer said, noting that two of those arrested appeared in his film. “These are dark times. The developments we are covering in the documentary in the sense that the room for democracy is shrinking have just continued.”

    The continuing crackdown, which has even ensnared veteran lawyer and politician Martin Lee who helped draft Hong Kong’s post-colonial constitution, has further deepened divisions between China and western democracies including the United States, the UK and European Union.

    China anger at Oscars
    Unsurprisingly, the Oscar nomination for Do Not Split has caused upset in Beijing.

    An article in the Global Times, a Communist Party-controlled tabloid, dismissed the film as a “fake” documentary that “lacked artistry” and was “full of biased political stances”. Nominating such a film would “hurt the feelings” of Chinese audiences, it said.

    The Oscars will not be shown on the mainland, while the Hong Kong broadcaster TVB blamed “commercial” reasons for its decision not to broadcast the ceremony for the first time in more than half a century.

    “Our main aim in making this documentary was to bring attention to the critical situation in Hong Kong,” Hammer said. “Ironically, the censorship of the Oscars and the attention brought to our documentary has resulted in more stories about the critical situation in Hong Kong so Beijing is helping us.”


    Joey Siu testifies during a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration in December. The hearing was held to examine Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement through US refugee policy [Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images via AFP]
    Siu now works at international advocacy group Hong Kong Watch, where she has addressed politicians in the US and further afield on the situation in Hong Kong, which she is convinced China wants to make into just “another, ordinary mainland Chinese city”.
    She is worried about the place she was forced to flee, but finds comfort in the new ways people in Hong Kong are resisting, and that democratic governments appear increasingly willing to defend and stand up for their values and way of life.

    “I am pretty motivated and encouraged to see, that either here in the States or in other countries, like in Europe, people are starting to realise that this strategy we have been taking for years is wrong and that we have to be taking a much tougher and also more comprehensive approach to deal with China,” she said.

    It is a long way from the quiet life of a teacher.

    SOURCE: AL JAZEERA

    threads
    The-Academy-Awards
    Hong-Kong-protests
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    International Feature Film

    Oct 22, 2021 4:38am PT
    Oscars Race: ‘The Stranger’ Selected by Palestine as International Feature Candidate, Intramovies Takes Sales (EXCLUSIVE)
    By Patrick Frater, Nick Vivarelli, Leo Barraclough, K.J. Yossman, Rebecca Davis, Jazz Tangcay

    Courtesy Intramovies
    “The Stranger,” a first feature by writer-director Ameer Fakher Eldin about a doctor going through an existential crisis in the occupied Golan Heights, has been selected as Palestine’s official entry in the International Feature Film category at the upcoming Academy Awards.

    Italy’s Intramovies has announced that it is taking world rights to the picture shot on location which recently launched from the Venice Film Festival’s independently run Venice Days section where it won the Edipo Re Award.

    “The Stranger” stars Palestine’s Ashraf Barhoum (“The Kingdom,” “Paradise Now”) playing an unlicensed doctor whose life takes an unlucky turn when he rescues a wounded man upon his return from the war in Syria.

    Producers are Palestine’s Fresco Films (Tony and Jiries Copti) and Germany’s Red Balloon Film (Dorothe Beinemeier). The film is co-produced by Metafora Production (Qatar) and executive producers are Gwen G. Wynne and Carol Ann Shine.

    “We’ve been impressed by the terrific directorial vision of this very young director,” said Intramovies head of acquisitions and production Marco Valerio Fusco in a statement.

    “The Stranger” is intended to be the first installment of a trilogy directed by Ameer Fakher Eldin. His second feature with the provisional title “Nothing of Nothing Remains” is being developed by Red Balloon. Intramovies is discussing the possibility of a continued collaboration with the director’s team.

    HONG KONG
    Hong Kong has selected “Zero to Hero,” a sports and family drama film as its contender in the Academy Awards’ best international feature category. The decision was announced Friday by the territory’s Motion Picture Industry Association.

    Directed by Jimmy Wan Chi-man, the film is a biopic of the Paralympic athlete So Wa-wai who was born with cerebral palsy but went on to win 12 medals between 1996 and 2012, and break world records.

    With production handled by One Cool Films, the film premiered at the Udine festival of Asian films and was released commercially in Hong Kong on August 12. Leading Hong Kong actor Sandra Ng, who plays the pivotal role of So’s mother, is credited as one of the film’s producers.

    Still on release in the city, “Zero” is the highest-grossing local film this year with a cumulative box office to Oct. 21, 2021, of HK$27.5 million ($3.53 million).

    IRAN
    Asghar Farhadi’s “A Hero” has been selected by Iran to represent the country at the upcoming Academy Awards in the Best International Feature Film category.

    The widely expected decision by the Iranian Film Board was announced on Thursday by the Farabi Cinema Foundation, which is the country’s international film body.

    Farhadi has previously won two international Oscars for, respectively, “A Separation” in 2011 and “The Salesman” in 2016, the former of which was also nominated for original screenplay.

    “A Hero,” which launched positively in July from the Cannes Film Festival where it tied for the Grand Prix, the fest’s runner-up prize, is the story of Rahim (Amir Jadidi), who is in prison for a debt that he was unable to pay. During a two-day leave, an act of kindness provides him with an opportunity to convince his creditor to withdraw the complaint so he can go free, but not everything goes as planned.

    It will be released by Amazon in the U.S.

    MEXICO
    Tatiana Huezo’s “Prayers for the Stolen” (“Noche de Fuego”) has been selected by Mexico’s Oscar committee to represent the country in the international feature film race.

    The drama, which follows three girls as they come of age in a village rampant with human trafficking and the drug trade, competed in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard section and was awarded a special mention. “Prayers for the Stolen” also took home the best Latin American film award at San Sebastian. The film stars Mayra Batalla, Norma Pablo and Olivia Lagunas and was produced by Nicolás Célis and Jim Stark. “Prayers for the Stolen” has been acquired by Netflix.

    FRANCE
    Julia Ducournau’s Palme d’Or Winning “Titane” has been selected by France’s Oscar committee to represent the country in the international feature film race.

    “Titane” recently won the people’s choice award at Toronto, where is played in the Midnight Madness section.
    This year’s French Oscar committee includes Julie Delpy; Zeller; producers Iris Knobloch and Alain Goldman, whose credits include the Oscar-winning film “La Vie En Rose”; Emilie Georges, the Oscar-winning producer of “Call Me by Your Name” and founder of Memento International; and Grégory Chambet, co-founder of the sales company WTFilms. The committee also has three permanent members: Cannes Film Festival director Thierry Frémaux; UniFrance president Serge Toubiana; and Elisabeth Tanner, talent agent and representative of the Cesar Academy.

    ICELAND

    Valdimar Jóhannsson’s “Lamb” has been selected by Iceland’s Oscar committee to represent the country in the international feature film race.

    The body horror film, which was recently released domestically by Neon across 562 screens, was chosen over Audrey Diwan’s “Happening,” winner of Venice’s Golden Lion, and Cedric Jimenez’s “The Stronghold.” “Lamb” is Jóhannsson’s debut feature film, and he co-wrote the screenplay with Icelandic poet Sjón. The film follows a childless couple in rural Iceland who make an alarming discovery one day in their sheep barn.

    AUSTRIA
    Austria has picked director Sebastian Meise’s drama “Great Freedom” as its official submission for Best International Feature Film Oscars race.

    The decision was announced by Austrian Films and the Film and Music Austria industry association of the Austrian Economic Chambers, and confirmed by the film’s distributor MUBI.

    The somber drama world premiered in the Un Certain Regard section at Cannes, where it won the Un Certain Regard Jury Prize, before going on to win the award for best feature at the Sarajevo Film Festival.

    Set in Germany after World War II, it tells the story of Hans, a man repeatedly sent to prison over multiple decades for his ****sexuality. With each return, he grows ever-closer with his cellmate Viktor, a convicted murderer serving a life sentence, and what begins as revulsion blossoms over time to something far more tender.

    The film stars Franz Rogowski (“Victoria,” “Undine,” “Transit,” “A Hidden Life”) and Silver Bear winner Georg Friedrich (“Helle Nächte,” “The Piano Teacher”) and was produced by Sabine Moser, Oliver Neumann, and Benny Drechsel. Meise co-wrote the screenplay with Thomas Reider.

    “Great Freedoms” also opened Filmfest Hamburg in late September and had its U.K. premiere at the BFI London Film Festival in early October. It film will continue to screen at festivals globally this fall and winter, including Chicago International Film Festival, Montclair Film Festival, Philadelphia Film Festival, Denver Film Festival, and others, before releasing theatrically in the U.S. and U.K. on March 4, 2022.

    JAPAN
    Japan has selected Hamaguchi Ryusuke’s “Drive My Car” as its contender for the Academy Awards’ best international film category.

    The selection was made by the Motion Picture Producers Association of Japan (Eiren). The news was first reported by Japan’s Sankei News organization and confirmed by the film’s local distributor Bitters End.

    The three-hour film debuted in competition at the Cannes film festival in July, where it won a handful of prizes including the best screenplay award for Hamaguchi and Takamasa Oe’s adaptation of Murakami Haruki short story. It tells the tale of a widower director and his stoical female chauffeur as they drive to Hiroshima.

    It is now a star attraction on the fall festival circuit, with appearances at Toronto, San Sebastian, New York, Busan, London, Sydney and the New Zealand festivals. International sales are handled by Germany’s The Match Factory. Japanese theatrical distribution began in August.

    For nearly two decades, a group of slightly more established Japanese directors– Kore-eda Hirokazu, Kawase Naomi, Kurosawa Kiyoshi and Kitano Takeshi – collectively referred to as the “4K” directors have garnered the lion’s share of major festival invitations and prizes, leaving a younger generation of Japanese filmmakers in relative obscurity internationally. With his two films this year “Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy” debuted in Berlin) and huge international acclaim for “Drive My Car” Hamaguchi has decisively broken through the “4K” barrier.

    Japan has been submitting Oscar contenders since the beginning of the foreign-language category. A dozen Japanese films have gone on to earn nominations, and one, “Departures” won the Oscar in 2008.

    CZECH REPUBLIC
    Sports biopic “Zatopek” has been selected to represent the Czech Republic. The film is directed by David Ondricek and had its world premiere at this year’s 55th Karlovy Vary International Festival. The selection was announced by the Czech Film and Television Academy, which said that it had weighed up 13 eligible fiction, documentary, and animated films. Nicknamed the Czech Locomotive, the real life Emil Zatopek was one of the most famous long distance runners of all time. He won the 5,000 metre, 10,000 metre races and the marathon at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki. The achievement has never been repeated.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    continued from previous post


    TAIWAN

    Taiwan has selected Chung Mong-hong’s pandemic-set drama “The Falls” as its contender in the international feature film race at the 94th Academy Awards. It is the third time that a film by Chung has represented Taiwan and the second time in succession.

    In the 2019—20 race Taiwan selected Chung’s family drama “A Sun,” which was retained on the Oscars shortlist, but ultimately did not receive a nomination.

    “The Falls” premiered in the Horizons section at last month’s Venice Film Festival followed by an appearance at the Toronto International Film Festival. In recent days, it received 11 nominations at the 58th Golden Horse Awards, including best feature film and two best actress nominations for its female leads.

    Set against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, “The Falls,” starring Gingle Wang (“Detention”) and Alyssa Chia (“The World Between Us”), depicts how an unexpected home quarantine can take a strained relationship between a mother and a daughter on a different direction.

    The Oscar shortlist will be announced on Dec. 21.

    HUNGARY
    Péter Bergendy’s period horror film “Post Mortem” has been selected to represent Hungary in the international feature film race of the 94th Academy Awards. The film tells the supernatural story of a post-mortem photographer and a young girl confronting ghosts in a haunted village after World War I.

    The decision to select the film was made by the Hungarian Oscar Committee, whose members included Csaba Káel, the government commissioner for the development of the Hungarian motion picture industry, and chairman of the National Film Institute, director Csaba Bereczki, director Kristóf Deák, screenwriter Tibor Fonyódi, film distribution expert András Kálmán, producer Ákos Pesti and Emil Novák, a cinematographer.

    “Post Mortem” premiered at the Warsaw and Sitges film festivals last year, and went on to screen at more than 20 genre festivals. The film picked up prizes at the Trieste, Fantasporto, Sombra and Parma genre festivals, and was the winner of this year’s Hungarian Motion Picture Awards for cinematography, editing, production design and make-up.

    The film’s producers are Tamás Lajos and Ábel Köves of Szupermodern Stúdió. The story was by Bergendy and Gábor Hellebrandt, and the screenplay was written by Piros Zánkay.

    International sales are handled by NFI World Sales, which has scored deals for major territories in Europe, including France, Italy, Germany and Poland, South Korea, Southeast Asia, including Vietnam, Indonesia and Hong Kong, for India and Latin America. In North America, Black Mandala acquired distribution rights. — Leo Barraclough.


    SOMALIA
    On Tuesday, “The Gravedigger’s Wife,” Khadar Ahmed’s drama which opened at Cannes’ Critics Week, was chosen as the first official submission from Somalia at the Oscars.

    The critically acclaimed movie was unanimously selected by Somalia’s first Oscar selection committee, which was created this year with six artists working in different entertainment fields.

    The film, directed by Khadar Ayderus Ahmed, was inspired by a personal tragedy that happened in the filmmaker’s family 10 years ago in Helsinki, and follows a gravedigger (Omar Abdi) and family man living in the outskirts of Djibouti city who sets off to save his wife who needs expensive surgery. It was produced by Misha Jaari, Mark Lwoff and Risto Nikkilä at Helsinki-based Bufo.

    “The Gravedigger’s Wife” will screen at the BFI London Film Festival in October ahead of its U.S. premiere at the Chicago International Film Festival. The film will then have its African premiere at the Pan-African Film and Television Festival of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso.

    The film will be released in Finland and Norway on Nov. 12, and in France in 2022 with Urban Distribution handling. Orange Studio is handling international sales on “The Gravedigger’s Wife,” which played at Toronto following Cannes and won the Amplify Voices Award. — Patrick Frater

    SOUTH KOREA
    On Tuesday, South Korea selected action drama “Escape From Mogadishu” as its contender.

    Directed by Ryoo Seung-wan, “Escape From Mogadishu” is based on real events in the 1990s when normally antagonistic diplomats from North and South Korea joined forces to escape civil war in Somalia.

    The film has been one of the few bright spots for local movies this year at a depressed and battered Korean box office. It is the year’s highest-grossing film, local or international, with a gross of $28.9 million.

    The Korean Film Council, which announced the selection, said that it had picked “Mogadishu” from a shortlist of six. Last year Korean film “Parasite” won the international feature category and a total haul of four Oscars, including best picture. — Patrick Frater

    SPAIN
    Also on Tuesday, Spain picked Javier Bardem-starring “The Good Boss” as its hopeful in the Oscars category.

    Directed by Fernando León de Aranoa, “The Good Boss” (aka “El Buen Patron”) is the story of an industrial scales manufacturer who races to try to resolve his workers’ problems ahead of a factory visit by an awards committee.

    It recently enjoyed its world premiere at the San Sebastian Film Festival and followed that with an appearance at the Zurich festival last week. It will enjoy its commercial debut later this month in Spain (Oct. 15). Its selection was a major surprise in some quarters, as Pedro Almodóvar’s “Parallel Mothers” which debuted last month as the opening title of the Venice Film Festival, had been the overwhelming favorite. — John Hopewell

    CANADA
    On Monday, Canada announced that “Drunken Birds” [a.k.a. “Les Oiseaux Ivres], by director and co-writer Ivan Grbovic and co-writer Sara Mishara, will be its flagbearer.

    The film premiered last month in the Platform section of the Toronto Film Festival. Telefilm Canada, which announced the selection, said that “Birds” was the Canadian film “with the best chance of being nominated for this prestigious award.”

    “It is a film with which we wanted to celebrate the power of film, while taking the audience on a journey through the beauty, absurdity and injustice of our lives today. We would like to share this honor with the rest of the film team, but also with the seasonal workers who leave their families every year to better their lives,” said Grbovic on behalf of himself and Mishara. — Patrick Frater

    KYRGYZSTAN
    “Shambala,” written and directed by Artykpai Suyundukov, was recently selected as Kyrgyzstan’s entry. The film is a portrait of a boy living with his family in a protected mountain forest, whose childhood world of myths and legends begins to clash with the harsh realities of the adult world.

    The film is based on Chingiz Aitmatov’s novella “The White Ship,” and was developed by Suyundukov over the course of 40 years. It was produced by National Film Studio Kyrgyzfilm in collaboration with Aitysh Film.

    It had its premiere at the Shanghai Film Festival. It won the best director award at the Kolkata Film Festival and best film of the CIS and Baltics prize at the Nika Awards in Russia. — Leo Barraclough.

    IRELAND
    As previously reported, Seán Breathnach’s “Shelter” was chosen by the Irish Film and Television Academy as Ireland’s competitor in the race for the Oscar for International Feature Film.

    “Shelter,” titled “Foscadh” in Irish, follows the story of John Cunliffe, an overprotected recluse who must learn to navigate the world at the age of 28 after his parents die. Friendless and naive, Cunliffe, played by Dónall Ó Héalai (“Arracht”), must also learn to deal with trust and vengeance as he finds his mountain land inheritance is impeding a profitable wind-farm development.

    Breathnach wrote and directed the feature, which is based on Donal Ryan’s novel “The Thing About December.” Fionnuala Flaherty (“An Klon****”) and Cillian O’Gairbhí (“Blood”) also star.

    “Shelter” was produced by Paddy Hayes (“Cumar: A Galway Rhapsody”) via his company Magamedia. The Yellow Affair is handling international sales.

    The film won the Best First Film award at the Galway Film Fleadh. — K.J. Yossman

    GERMANY
    Maria Schrader’s screwball romantic comedy “I’m Your Man” (“Ich Bin Dein Mensch”) was selected as Germany’s Oscar contender.

    The film’s premise is that of a scientist who, in order to obtain research funds, agrees to live for three weeks with a humanoid robot specifically engineered for her happiness.

    The film had its world premiere earlier this year at the Berlinale, where star Maren Eggert won the Silver Bear for her performance.

    Its German theatrical release in July, handled by Majestic Filmverleih, saw it achieve more than 100,000 ticket sales. The film had its North American premiere at the Toronto Film Festival. It has been licensed to more than 60 countries. Its U.S. release through Bleecker Street kicks off on Friday.

    At the German Film Prizes, “I’m Your Man” was nominated in five categories: film, directing, screenplay (Schrader and Jan Schomburg), actress (Eggert) and actor (Dan Stevens). — Patrick Frater
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    Continued from previous post

    Submissions for the 2021-22 Oscars
    Austria: “Great Freedoms” dir. Sebastian Meise

    Cambodia: “White Building” dir. Kavich Neang.

    Canada: “Drunken Birds” dir. Ivan Grbovic

    Czech Republic: “Zatopek” dir. David Ondricek

    Ecuador: “Submersible” dir. Alfredo Leon Leon

    Georgia: “Brighton 4th” dir. Levan Koguashvili

    Germany: “I’m Your Man” dir. Maria Schrader

    Hong Kong: “Zero to Hero” dir. Wan Chi-man

    Hungary: “Post Mortem” dir. Péter Bergendy

    Iceland: “Lamb” dir Valdimar Jóhannsson

    Iran: “A Hero” dir. Asghar Farhadi

    Ireland: “Shelter” dir. Seán Breathnach

    Japan: “Drive My Car” dir. Hamguchi Ryusuke

    Kosovo: “Hive” dir. Blerta Basholli

    Kyrgyzstan: “Shambala,” dir. Artykpai Suyundukov

    Morocco: “Casablanca Beats” dir. Nabil Ayouch

    Mexico: “Prayers for the Stolen” dir. Tatiana Huezo

    Palestine: “The Stranger” dir. Ameer Fakher Eldin

    Poland: “Leave No Traces” dir. Jan P. Matuszynski

    Serbia: “Oasis” dir. Ivan Ikic

    South Korea: “Escape From Mogadishu” dir. Ryoo Seung-wan.

    Spain: “The Good Boss” dir. Fernando de Leon Aranoa.

    Sweden: “Tigers” dir. Ronnie Sandahl

    Switzerland: “Olga” dir. Elie Grappe

    Taiwan: “The Falls” dir. Chung Mong-hong
    I don't think we've covered any of these here this year.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    The 94th academy awards | 2022

    ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    JAVIER BARDEM
    Being the Ricardos
    BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH
    The Power of the Dog
    ANDREW GARFIELD
    tick, tick...BOOM!
    WILL SMITH
    King Richard
    DENZEL WASHINGTON
    The Tragedy of Macbeth

    ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    CIARÁN HINDS
    Belfast
    TROY KOTSUR
    CODA
    JESSE PLEMONS
    The Power of the Dog
    J.K. SIMMONS
    Being the Ricardos
    KODI SMIT-MCPHEE
    The Power of the Dog

    ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    JESSICA CHASTAIN
    The Eyes of Tammy Faye
    OLIVIA COLMAN
    The Lost Daughter
    PENÉLOPE CRUZ
    Parallel Mothers
    NICOLE KIDMAN
    Being the Ricardos
    KRISTEN STEWART
    Spencer

    ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    JESSIE BUCKLEY
    The Lost Daughter
    ARIANA DEBOSE
    West Side Story
    JUDI DENCH
    Belfast
    KIRSTEN DUNST
    The Power of the Dog
    AUNJANUE ELLIS
    King Richard

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    ENCANTO
    Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino and Clark Spencer
    FLEE
    Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie
    LUCA
    Enrico Casarosa and Andrea Warren
    THE MITCHELLS VS. THE MACHINES
    Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller and Kurt Albrecht
    RAYA AND THE LAST DRAGON
    Don Hall, Carlos López Estrada, Osnat Shurer and Peter Del Vecho

    CINEMATOGRAPHY
    NOMINEES
    DUNE
    Greig Fraser
    NIGHTMARE ALLEY
    Dan Laustsen
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Ari Wegner
    THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH
    Bruno Delbonnel
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Janusz Kaminski

    COSTUME DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    CRUELLA
    Jenny Beavan
    CYRANO
    Massimo Cantini Parrini and Jacqueline Durran
    DUNE
    Jacqueline West and Robert Morgan
    NIGHTMARE ALLEY
    Luis Sequeira
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Paul Tazewell

    DIRECTING
    NOMINEES
    BELFAST
    Kenneth Branagh
    DRIVE MY CAR
    Ryusuke Hamaguchi
    LICORICE PIZZA
    Paul Thomas Anderson
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Jane Campion
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Steven Spielberg

    DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
    NOMINEES
    ASCENSION
    Jessica Kingdon, Kira Simon-Kennedy and Nathan Truesdell
    ATTICA
    Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry
    FLEE
    Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie
    SUMMER OF SOUL (...OR, WHEN THE REVOLUTION COULD NOT BE TELEVISED)
    Ahmir "Questlove" Thompson, Joseph Patel, Robert Fyvolent and David Dinerstein
    WRITING WITH FIRE
    Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh

    DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)
    NOMINEES
    AUDIBLE
    Matt Ogens and Geoff McLean
    LEAD ME HOME
    Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk
    THE QUEEN OF BASKETBALL
    Ben Proudfoot
    THREE SONGS FOR BENAZIR
    Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei
    WHEN WE WERE BULLIES
    Jay Rosenblatt

    FILM EDITING
    NOMINEES
    DON'T LOOK UP
    Hank Corwin
    DUNE
    Joe Walker
    KING RICHARD
    Pamela Martin
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Peter Sciberras
    TICK, TICK...BOOM!
    Myron Kerstein and Andrew Weisblum

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    DRIVE MY CAR
    Japan
    FLEE
    Denmark
    THE HAND OF GOD
    Italy
    LUNANA: A YAK IN THE CLASSROOM
    Bhutan
    THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD
    Norway

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
    NOMINEES
    COMING 2 AMERICA
    Mike Marino, Stacey Morris and Carla Farmer
    CRUELLA
    Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne and Julia Vernon
    DUNE
    Donald Mowat, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr
    THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE
    Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram and Justin Raleigh
    HOUSE OF GUCCI
    Göran Lundström, Anna Carin Lock and Frederic Aspiras

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
    NOMINEES
    DON'T LOOK UP
    Nicholas Britell
    DUNE
    Hans Zimmer
    ENCANTO
    Germaine Franco
    PARALLEL MOTHERS
    Alberto Iglesias
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Jonny Greenwood

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
    NOMINEES
    BE ALIVE
    from King Richard; Music and Lyric by DIXSON and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter
    DOS ORUGUITAS
    from Encanto; Music and Lyric by Lin-Manuel Miranda
    DOWN TO JOY
    from Belfast; Music and Lyric by Van Morrison
    NO TIME TO DIE
    from No Time to Die; Music and Lyric by Billie Eilish and Finneas O'Connell
    SOMEHOW YOU DO
    from Four Good Days; Music and Lyric by Diane Warren

    BEST PICTURE
    NOMINEES
    BELFAST
    Laura Berwick, Kenneth Branagh, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas, Producers
    CODA
    Philippe Rousselet, Fabrice Gianfermi and Patrick Wachsberger, Producers
    DON'T LOOK UP
    Adam McKay and Kevin Messick, Producers
    DRIVE MY CAR
    Teruhisa Yamamoto, Producer
    DUNE
    Mary Parent, Denis Villeneuve and Cale Boyter, Producers
    KING RICHARD
    Tim White, Trevor White and Will Smith, Producers
    LICORICE PIZZA
    Sara Murphy, Adam Somner and Paul Thomas Anderson, Producers
    NIGHTMARE ALLEY
    Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale and Bradley Cooper, Producers
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Roger Frappier, Producers
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, Producers

    PRODUCTION DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    DUNE
    Production Design: Patrice Vermette; Set Decoration: Zsuzsanna Sipos
    NIGHTMARE ALLEY
    Production Design: Tamara Deverell; Set Decoration: Shane Vieau
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Production Design: Grant Major; Set Decoration: Amber Richards
    THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH
    Production Design: Stefan Dechant; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Rena DeAngelo

    SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)
    NOMINEES
    AFFAIRS OF THE ART
    Joanna Quinn and Les Mills
    BESTIA
    Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz
    BOXBALLET
    Anton Dyakov
    ROBIN ROBIN
    Dan Ojari and Mikey Please
    THE WINDSHIELD WIPER
    Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez

    SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)
    NOMINEES
    ALA KACHUU - TAKE AND RUN
    Maria Brendle and Nadine Lüchinger
    THE DRESS
    Tadeusz Łysiak and Maciej Ślesicki
    THE LONG GOODBYE
    Aneil Karia and Riz Ahmed
    ON MY MIND
    Martin Strange-Hansen and Kim Magnusson
    PLEASE HOLD
    K.D. Dávila and Levin Menekse

    SOUND
    NOMINEES
    BELFAST
    Denise Yarde, Simon Chase, James Mather and Niv Adiri
    DUNE
    Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett
    NO TIME TO DIE
    Simon Hayes, Oliver Tarney, James Harrison, Paul Massey and Mark Taylor
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Richard Flynn, Robert Mackenzie and Tara Webb
    WEST SIDE STORY
    Tod A. Maitland, Gary Rydstrom, Brian Chumney, Andy Nelson and Shawn Murphy

    VISUAL EFFECTS
    NOMINEES
    DUNE
    Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Brian Connor and Gerd Nefzer
    FREE GUY
    Swen Gillberg, Bryan Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis and Dan Sudick
    NO TIME TO DIE
    Charlie Noble, Joel Green, Jonathan Fawkner and Chris Corbould
    SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS
    Christopher Townsend, Joe Farrell, Sean Noel Walker and Dan Oliver
    SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME
    Kelly Port, Chris Waegner, Scott Edelstein and Dan Sudick

    WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    CODA
    Screenplay by Siân Heder
    DRIVE MY CAR
    Screenplay by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe
    DUNE
    Screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve and Eric Roth
    THE LOST DAUGHTER
    Written by Maggie Gyllenhaal
    THE POWER OF THE DOG
    Written by Jane Campion

    WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    BELFAST
    Written by Kenneth Branagh
    DON'T LOOK UP
    Screenplay by Adam McKay; Story by Adam McKay & David Sirota
    KING RICHARD
    Written by Zach Baylin
    LICORICE PIZZA
    Written by Paul Thomas Anderson
    THE WORST PERSON IN THE WORLD
    Written by Eskil Vogt, Joachim Trier
    From THE 94TH ACADEMY AWARDS | 2022
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    Well ****...

    The one year that I kinda tune out of the Oscars and look what happens...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    The Academy Awards

    Sep 20, 2022 10:43am PT
    ‘RRR’ Team Reacts to India Not Selecting It for Oscars, Urges Academy to Vote for It in Other Categories

    Variance Films will launch a full awards campaign and will seek the best picture nomination
    By Clayton Davis

    DVV Entertainment

    India has selected Pan Nalin’s “Last Film Show” (“Chhello Show”) to represent the country in the best international feature category at the upcoming 95th Academy Awards, but it’s not going over well in social media circles. That’s due to the popularity and love for the historical epic, “RRR” from S.S. Rajamouli, which has been a fan-favorite and box office hit stateside.

    The good news is the U.S. distributor for the film has opted to launch a full awards campaign for the action drama and is calling on the 10,000 Academy members to consider voting for the film in all categories.

    “RRR” will be submitted for best picture, director (S.S. Rajamouli), original screenplay (Rajamouli and V. Vijayendra Prasad), lead actor (for both N.T. Rama Rao Jr and Ram Charan), supporting actor (Ajay Devgn), supporting actress (Alia Bhatt), original song (“Naatu Naatu”), original score (M.M. Keeravaani), cinematography, production design, film editing, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, sound and visual effects.

    The film is not yet available on the Academy Streaming Room, which is part of a strategy to get as many voters to see it on the big screen in order to highlight its epic scale and breathtaking visuals.

    “Over the last six months, we have seen the joy that S.S. Rajamouli’s ‘RRR’ has brought to global audiences,” says the president of Variance Films, Dylan Marchetti. “We have seen the film gross over $140 million worldwide to become one of India’s highest grossing films of all time and become the first film in history to trend globally on Netflix for over 14 weeks. We have seen the film fill up theaters with cheering audiences months after its initial release, including the historic TCL Chinese IMAX theater in Hollywood, where it will play next Friday to an audience that sold out of one of the largest theaters in the country in just 15 minutes. Most importantly, we have heard fans from around the world tell us that they believe this is one of the best films of the year from any nation. We agree. We proudly invite the Academy to consider ‘RRR’ in all categories.”

    The three-hour action epic follows two patriotic but philosophically opposed men (Ram Charan and N.T. Rama Rao Jr.), who team up to rescue a girl from British colonial officials in 1920s Delhi. A global smash with huge box office receipts, the film found a pathway to the American cultural zeitgeist with consumers discovering it on Netflix. The film, distributed by Variance Films in the U.S., has been one of the most popular titles of the year, becoming a trending topic on social media over the past few months.

    With ₹240 crores (US $30 million) worldwide on its first day, “RRR” broke the record for the biggest opening day collectively earned by an Indian film.

    Spoken in the Telugu language, it would have represented the first “Tollywood” film to enter the Oscar race, but politics can play a role in what the country has submitted over the years. In Oscar history, only three Indian films have been nominated for best international feature — ”Mother India” (1957), “Salaam Bombay!” (1988) and “Lagaan” (2001), and none have won.

    Full disclosure: I haven’t seen “Last Film Show,” a partly autobiographical drama set against the backdrop of Indian cinemas witnessing a massive transition from celluloid to digital — a story that seems to be fitting with a common trend of humanity’s love for cinema with films like “The Fabelmans” and “Empire of Light” in the Oscar mix.

    As we’ve seen with nearly every Academy Awards ceremony, it’s not always about “what is the best” but rather “what they’ve seen.” So India’s missteps of not selecting “The Lunchbox” (2013) or “The Disciple” (2020), which many presumed to be “slam dunk” choices, fit their most recent move.

    With the film out of the running for international feature, the studio is hopeful that Academy voters will be more inclined to check it off. In addition, Variance Films is hoping it can make waves like other non-English language films not representing its countries, such as “City of God” (2003), which was nominated for directing, or last year’s “Parallel Mothers,” which nabbed mentions for Penelope Cruz and original score.
    Rajamouli also did Baahubali. I've seen RRR and loved it. Maybe I'll post a review later...

    Rrr
    The-Academy-Awards
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    coulda been a contender...

    Sep 26, 2022 10:13pm PTSamuel Goldwyn Head Weighs in on Controversial India Oscar Selection and ‘RRR’ Snub, Calls ‘The Last Film Show’ a ‘Strong Contender’
    By Patrick Frater

    Pan Nalin

    U.S distributor Samuel Goldwyn Films president Peter Goldwyn has weighed in on the backlash to India’s selection of its competitor for this year’s best international film race at the Oscars, calling candidate “The Last Film Show,” which it will release in North America, “a really strong contender.”

    Directed by Pan Nalin (“Samsara,” “Valley of Flowers”), the Gujarati-language film is the story of a nine-year old boy pursuing his dreams in cinema. It debuted at the Tribeca Festival in 2021 and has since played fests in Palms Springs, Seattle and Mill Valley. “Last Film Show” will have its commercial release in Gujarat, India on Oct. 14, 2022, giving it the necessary qualifying theatrical run in its home territory.

    The selection by the Film Federation of India was announced last week, immediately sparking a backlash, led by cries that popular blockbuster musical “RRR” was snubbed. Director SS Rajamouli’s action film has done huge business worldwide, with some arguing it would offer a more accessible experience to Oscar voters.

    Variance Films, the stateside distributor of “RRR,” still plans to mount an Oscar campaign urging Academy voters to consider the film in other categories.

    “Last Film Show” has also attracted its own backlash, with online claims suggesting that it hews too closely to Giuseppe Tornatore’s 1988 Italian classic “Cinema Paradiso.”

    BN Tiwari, president of the Federation of Western India Cine Employees, has even claimed that “Last Film Show” is foreign-produced and should not be considered as an Indian work. The film is represented in international markets by France’s Orange Studios and is structured as a majority Indian-minority French co-production using the bilateral treaty between the two countries. Indian companies involved in the production include: Jugaad Motion Pictures, Monsoon Films, Chhello Show LLP and Roy Kapur Films. The French co-producer is Virginie Films.

    “We believe that ‘Last Film Show’ speaks to the heart and soul of cinema, which will be appealing not only to moviegoers in the United States but also Academy members,” said SGF president Peter Goldwyn. “We believe that the film is a really strong contender this year, and we’re excited to bring it to American audiences. We are also eager to bring our expertise with Academy Awards campaigns to the release of this title.”

    “Orange Studio was the first believer in Pan Nalin’s beautiful film ‘Last Film Show.’ We acquired the movie at the script level and came on board to handle the world sales of the film. The film has been sold to multiple territories and we are looking forward to its release in Italy on 24th November and Japan on 20th January (2023). However, the most important releases will be in India on 14th October and in the U.S. with our distributor Samuel Goldwyn Films towards the end of the year, which coincides with the Oscar campaign,” said Kristina Zimmerman, CEO of Orange Studio (“The Father,” “The Artist”).

    “Our years of experience tells us that ‘Last Film Show’ has a huge chance of winning the hearts of moviegoers around the world and especially Academy Award members. And we plan to dedicate our total attention to running a successful Oscar campaign in coordination with our partners at Samuel Goldwyn Films for ‘Last Film Show,'” she said.

    Variance said that “RRR” will be submitted for best picture, director (S.S. Rajamouli), original screenplay (Rajamouli and V. Vijayendra Prasad), lead actor (for both N.T. Rama Rao Jr and Ram Charan), supporting actor (Ajay Devgn), supporting actress (Alia Bhatt), original song (“Naatu Naatu”), original score (M.M. Keeravaani), cinematography, production design, film editing, costume design, makeup and hairstyling, sound and visual effects.
    Rrr
    The-Academy-Awards
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,079

    Hollywood Chinese

    Academy Museum to Present Monthlong ‘Hollywood Chinese’ Screening Series
    The program, curated by documentarian and Academy member Arthur Dong, features both celebration and critique of the first century of depicting Chinese in cinema.
    BY REBECCA SUN


    Clockwise from top left: Big Trouble in Little China, Enter the Dragon, M. Butterfly, The Joy Luck Club, Charlie Chan in Honolulu and Flower Drum Song 20THCENTFOX/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION (2); COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION (3); TAKASHI SEIDA/GEFFEN PICTURES/COURTESY EVERETT COLLECTION


    The Academy Museum is dedicating November to a monthlong reflection on the history of Chinese depictions in cinema.

    “Hollywood Chinese: The First 100 Years,” programmed by documentarian and longtime Academy member Arthur Dong, is a screening series of features and shorts – some classics, some obscurities – that mark both highlights and lowlights of how Chinese have been portrayed in film, particularly in the Western studio system. The series is an evolution of Dong’s 2007 documentary, which kicks off the series Nov. 4, and 2019 book of the same name.

    “When people see a film like Hollywood Chinese, they’re really only seeing snippets. We really need to see the whole, because it’s not fair to the artists and the creators that we critique and examine the work based on 30 seconds,” Dong, who previewed his series Oct. 23 as part of his ongoing Hollywood Chinese exhibition at West Hollywood’s famous Formosa Café, tells The Hollywood Reporter. “Here’s a chance for these questions about representation and the development of the Chinese persona in Hollywood films to go further now, with a full-fledged screening of entire films. I took it on as a responsibility and a burden to contextualize certain films, like [1937’s] Lost Horizon and [1964’s] 7 Faces of Dr. Lao.”

    As part of the series, Dong has programmed seven double features, films that may be separated by decades but are connected by certain similarities. For example, in Nov. 12’s “The Tong Wars,” both The Tong-Man (1919) starring Sessue Hayakawa and Michael Cimino’s Year of the Dragon (1985) spotlight Chinatown gang violence that drew ire from real-life Chinese American groups about the stereotypically violent portrayal of their community. “The Tong-Man was the catalyst for, as far as we know, the very first legal protest by a Chinese American organization against racist images in Hollywood films. The organizers in San Francisco wanted to file an injunction against it being shown,” says Dong, adding that 60 years later, MGM/UA settled a lawsuit from the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association in L.A. by agreeing to add a disclaimer to Year of the Dragon. “This is the legacy of uprising from the Asian American community, but it’s also the legacy of racist portrayals that are still happening today. Even in series like the current Kung Fu, whenever there are Chinese American or Chinese characters, there’s still this fallback to the more exotic and dangerous ‘vice’ of Chinatown.”

    The series also will look to celebrate underappreciated gems, particularly those that were made by venturing outside the Western studio system. In “Escape From Hollywood” on Nov. 27, Dong will screen 1968’s The Arch, considered one of Hong Kong’s first art films, and 1998 indie Xiu Xiu: The Sent-Down Girl. Both directed by Chinese women (Tang Shu Shuen and Joan Chen, respectively), the movies also represent examples of Chinese American talent having to leave America in order to expand their creative and professional horizons. “Joan Chen had the breakthrough role in The Last Emperor and was the ingénue who should have burst out, but she was mainly offered roles that exploited her sexualized exoticness,” says Dong, adding that Lisa Lu, who starred in The Arch, also faced typecasting in Hollywood before she made a name for herself in Chinese film. “That to me is Hollywood Chinese, too. It’s not just the films that we can trash. It’s also about the experience of the Chinese or Chinese American artist and what they went through and accomplished and the legacy they left us.”

    In his programming of the series, Dong intends to help attendees reckon with the complicated and sometimes contradictory legacy of Chinese portrayals in Hollywood, sometimes within the same film, such as Charlie Chan in Hollywood, The Sand Pebbles (which earned Makoto Iwamatsu an Oscar supporting actor nomination) and even Flower Drum Song. “Flower Drum Song is one of my all-time favorite films, it’s celebratory, but as David Henry Hwang says, it’s a film that has a lot of guilty pleasures. Sand Pebbles is beautifully made and kickstarted Mako’s decades-long career on screen and stage and put him on the map. But it’s about colonialism and white saviors and Chinese prostitutes and lecherous Chinese men played by James Hong,” says the programmer. “Most if not all the films have questions but also levels of celebration, of saying that we should be proud of what we’ve accomplished – within context – and we should take the critique in context and move forward and learn from all that.”


    Arthur Dong MATTHEW SIMMONS/GETTY IMAGES
    Several screenings will be accompanied by conversations with special guests, including Hong for Big Trouble in Little China (screening Nov. 5), Chen for both Xiu Xiu and The Last Emperor (which will be shown Nov. 27 as part of the museum’s ongoing Oscar Sundays series), Nancy Kwan (discussing both her starring role in Flower Drum Song, screening Nov. 25, and her experiences working with early leading men James Shigeta and Bruce Lee as part of Nov. 11’s double feature for Walk Like a Dragon and Enter the Dragon) and Academy president Janet Yang, who produced The Joy Luck Club (screening Nov. 26).

    For some of the selections, the Hollywood Chinese screenings will represent the highest-quality exhibitions some films have received in quite a while, or ever. “So much hard work has been done to put this series together, scouring archives, working with filmmakers and their families to secure the best available copies of these films,” says Bernardo Rondeau, the museum’s senior director of film programs, who first discussed the possibility of this screening series with Dong, a member of the organization’s inclusion advisory committee, several years ago before the museum even opened. “Some of these are rarely shown, like [David] Cronenberg’s M. Butterfly and The Arch, certainly not in [a setting with] the caliber of the Ted Mann Theater.”

    “To me, this series is one of the hallmark series for the museum. It contains in its methodology, approach and subject matter the DNA of what this museum and our film programming is about: focused on inclusion and expansion,” Rondeau says. “It’s a bittersweet story of film history. We’re going back in the past and hopefully, in rediscovery, reshaping our understanding of film and the future of film.”
    This sounds very intriguing
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •