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Thread: The Academy Awards

  1. #61
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    And the nominees are...

    THE 93RD ACADEMY AWARDS | 2021
    Union Station Los Angeles and the Dolby Theatre at the Hollywood & Highland Center
    Sunday, April 25, 2021
    Honoring movies released in 2020

    ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    RIZ AHMED
    Sound of Metal
    CHADWICK BOSEMAN
    Ma Rainey's Black Bottom
    ANTHONY HOPKINS
    The Father
    GARY OLDMAN
    Mank
    STEVEN YEUN
    Minari

    ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    SACHA BARON COHEN
    The Trial of the Chicago 7
    DANIEL KALUUYA
    Judas and the Black Messiah
    LESLIE ODOM, JR.
    One Night in Miami...
    PAUL RACI
    Sound of Metal
    LAKEITH STANFIELD
    Judas and the Black Messiah

    ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    VIOLA DAVIS
    Ma Rainey's Black Bottom
    ANDRA DAY
    The United States vs. Billie Holiday
    VANESSA KIRBY
    Pieces of a Woman
    FRANCES MCDORMAND
    Nomadland
    CAREY MULLIGAN
    Promising Young Woman

    ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
    NOMINEES
    MARIA BAKALOVA
    Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
    GLENN CLOSE
    Hillbilly Elegy
    OLIVIA COLMAN
    The Father
    AMANDA SEYFRIED
    Mank
    YUH-JUNG YOUN
    Minari

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    ONWARD
    Dan Scanlon and Kori Rae
    OVER THE MOON
    Glen Keane, Gennie Rim and Peilin Chou
    A SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE: FARMAGEDDON
    Richard Phelan, Will Becher and Paul Kewley
    SOUL
    Pete Docter and Dana Murray
    WOLFWALKERS
    Tomm Moore, Ross Stewart, Paul Young and Stéphan Roelants

    CINEMATOGRAPHY
    NOMINEES
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Sean Bobbitt
    MANK
    Erik Messerschmidt
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Dariusz Wolski
    NOMADLAND
    Joshua James Richards
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Phedon Papamichael

    COSTUME DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    EMMA
    Alexandra Byrne
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Ann Roth
    MANK
    Trish Summerville
    MULAN
    Bina Daigeler
    PINOCCHIO
    Massimo Cantini Parrini

    DIRECTING
    NOMINEES
    ANOTHER ROUND
    Thomas Vinterberg
    MANK
    David Fincher
    MINARI
    Lee Isaac Chung
    NOMADLAND
    Chloé Zhao
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Emerald Fennell

    DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)
    NOMINEES
    COLLECTIVE
    Alexander Nanau and Bianca Oana
    CRIP CAMP
    Nicole Newnham, Jim LeBrecht and Sara Bolder
    THE MOLE AGENT
    Maite Alberdi and Marcela Santibáñez
    MY OCTOPUS TEACHER
    Pippa Ehrlich, James Reed and Craig Foster
    TIME
    Garrett Bradley, Lauren Domino and Kellen Quinn

    DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)
    NOMINEES
    COLETTE
    Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard
    A CONCERTO IS A CONVERSATION
    Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers
    DO NOT SPLIT
    Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook
    HUNGER WARD
    Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman
    A LOVE SONG FOR LATASHA
    Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan

    FILM EDITING
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    Yorgos Lamprinos
    NOMADLAND
    Chloé Zhao
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Frédéric Thoraval
    SOUND OF METAL
    Mikkel E. G. Nielsen
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Alan Baumgarten

    INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM
    NOMINEES
    ANOTHER ROUND
    Denmark
    BETTER DAYS
    Hong Kong
    COLLECTIVE
    Romania
    THE MAN WHO SOLD HIS SKIN
    Tunisia
    QUO VADIS, AIDA?
    Bosnia and Herzegovina

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING
    NOMINEES
    EMMA
    Marese Langan, Laura Allen and Claudia Stolze
    HILLBILLY ELEGY
    Eryn Krueger Mekash, Matthew Mungle and Patricia Dehaney
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson
    MANK
    Gigi Williams, Kimberley Spiteri and Colleen LaBaff
    PINOCCHIO
    Mark Coulier, Dalia Colli and Francesco Pegoretti

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)
    NOMINEES
    DA 5 BLOODS
    Terence Blanchard
    MANK
    Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
    MINARI
    Emile Mosseri
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    James Newton Howard
    SOUL
    Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)
    NOMINEES
    FIGHT FOR YOU
    from Judas and the Black Messiah; Music by H.E.R. and Dernst Emile II; Lyric by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas
    HEAR MY VOICE
    from The Trial of the Chicago 7; Music by Daniel Pemberton; Lyric by Daniel Pemberton and Celeste Waite
    HUSAVIK
    from Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga; Music and Lyric by Savan Kotecha, Fat Max Gsus and Rickard Göransson
    IO SÌ (SEEN)
    from The Life Ahead (La Vita Davanti a Se); Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Diane Warren and Laura Pausini
    SPEAK NOW
    from One Night in Miami...; Music and Lyric by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth

    BEST PICTURE
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    David Parfitt, Jean-Louis Livi and Philippe Carcassonne, Producers
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Shaka King, Charles D. King and Ryan Coogler, Producers
    MANK
    Ceán Chaffin, Eric Roth and Douglas Urbanski, Producers
    MINARI
    Christina Oh, Producer
    NOMADLAND
    Frances McDormand, Peter Spears, Mollye Asher, Dan Janvey and Chloé Zhao, Producers
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Ben Browning, Ashley Fox, Emerald Fennell and Josey McNamara, Producers
    SOUND OF METAL
    Bert Hamelinck and Sacha Ben Harroche, Producers
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Marc Platt and Stuart Besser, Producers

    PRODUCTION DESIGN
    NOMINEES
    THE FATHER
    Production Design: Peter Francis; Set Decoration: Cathy Featherstone
    MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM
    Production Design: Mark Ricker; Set Decoration: Karen O'Hara and Diana Stoughton
    MANK
    Production Design: Donald Graham Burt; Set Decoration: Jan Pascale
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Production Design: David Crank; Set Decoration: Elizabeth Keenan
    TENET
    Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

    SHORT FILM (ANIMATED)
    NOMINEES
    BURROW
    Madeline Sharafian and Michael Capbarat
    GENIUS LOCI
    Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise
    IF ANYTHING HAPPENS I LOVE YOU
    Will McCormack and Michael Govier
    OPERA
    Erick Oh
    YES-PEOPLE
    Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson

    SHORT FILM (LIVE ACTION)
    NOMINEES
    FEELING THROUGH
    Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski
    THE LETTER ROOM
    Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan
    THE PRESENT
    Farah Nabulsi
    TWO DISTANT STRANGERS
    Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe
    WHITE EYE
    Tomer Shushan and Shira Hochman

    SOUND
    NOMINEES
    GREYHOUND
    Warren Shaw, Michael Minkler, Beau Borders and David Wyman
    MANK
    Ren Klyce, Jeremy Molod, David Parker, Nathan Nance and Drew Kunin
    NEWS OF THE WORLD
    Oliver Tarney, Mike Prestwood Smith, William Miller and John Pritchett
    SOUL
    Ren Klyce, Coya Elliott and David Parker
    SOUND OF METAL
    Nicolas Becker, Jaime Baksht, Michelle Couttolenc, Carlos Cortés and Phillip Bladh

    VISUAL EFFECTS
    NOMINEES
    LOVE AND MONSTERS
    Matt Sloan, Genevieve Camilleri, Matt Everitt and Brian Cox
    THE MIDNIGHT SKY
    Matthew Kasmir, Christopher Lawrence, Max Solomon and David Watkins
    MULAN
    Sean Faden, Anders Langlands, Seth Maury and Steve Ingram
    THE ONE AND ONLY IVAN
    Nick Davis, Greg Fisher, Ben Jones and Santiago Colomo Martinez
    TENET
    Andrew Jackson, David Lee, Andrew Lockley and Scott Fisher

    WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    BORAT SUBSEQUENT MOVIEFILM: DELIVERY OF PRODIGIOUS BRIBE TO AMERICAN REGIME FOR MAKE BENEFIT ONCE GLORIOUS NATION OF KAZAKHSTAN
    Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Peter Baynham & Erica Rivinoja & Dan Mazer & Jena Friedman & Lee Kern; Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Nina Pedrad
    THE FATHER
    Screenplay by Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller
    NOMADLAND
    Written for the screen by Chloé Zhao
    ONE NIGHT IN MIAMI...
    Screenplay by Kemp Powers
    THE WHITE TIGER
    Written for the screen by Ramin Bahrani

    WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)
    NOMINEES
    JUDAS AND THE BLACK MESSIAH
    Screenplay by Will Berson & Shaka King; Story by Will Berson & Shaka King and Kenny Lucas & Keith Lucas
    MINARI
    Written by Lee Isaac Chung
    PROMISING YOUNG WOMAN
    Written by Emerald Fennell
    SOUND OF METAL
    Screenplay by Darius Marder & Abraham Marder; Story by Darius Marder & Derek Cianfrance
    THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO 7
    Written by Aaron Sorkin
    The only one we've discussed at length here was Mulan. We have threads for Tenet and Promising Young Woman but I think that's it, right?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #62
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    Do Not Split

    Mar 17, 2021 3:03am PT
    China Tells Media to Stagger Oscars Telecast, Downplay Event (Report)

    By Patrick Frater


    Field of Vision
    The Chinese government has reportedly told its local media channels not to transmit live coverage of the Oscars and to downplay the awards ceremony. The move follows the nomination of “Do Not Split,” a 35-minute chronicle of the pro-democracy struggles in Hong Kong, in the documentary short subject category.

    The order reportedly came from the propaganda department of the Chinese Communist Party and instructed Chinese media to only report on non-controversial awards.

    Such instructions are not intended for publication or dissemination overseas and are difficult to verify. The matter was first reported by Hong Kong’s Apple Daily and Radio Free Asia, and subsequently also by Bloomberg.

    Directed by Norway’s Anders Hammer and produced by Hammer and Charlotte Cook for Field of Vision, the 35-minute film shows footage of the 2019 street protests in Hong Kong against the city government’s planned extradition law. Two marches in June 2019 were reported as attracting one million and two million participants, respectively, from a population of 7.5 million.



    Field of Vision is a company under the First Look Media umbrella, along with The Intercept, Topic Studios and the Press Freedom Defense Fund. “Do Not Split” is the company’s third Oscar nomination after “In The Absence” (2020) and “A Night at the Garden” (2019).

    The film follows the increase in physical violence and growing desperation by the pro-democracy camp after the extradition law was abandoned, only to be replaced in June 2020 with a Beijing-imposed National Security Law. It also discusses the erosion of rights of freedom of expression and the media.

    Oscar nominations were announced on Monday this week. The winners will be revealed at a ceremony in Los Angeles on April 26.

    The gag order illustrates how politics are complicating almost every aspect of entertainment, culture and the arts in mainland China and former British colony Hong Kong.

    The Oscar nominations contained two other pieces of news that might otherwise have been cheered by Chinese authorities: six nominations, including best film, for “Nomadland” by Chinese-born director Chloe Zhao; and the nomination of Hong Kong’s representative “Better Days,” in the best international feature category.

    Since Zhao’s Golden Globe directing prize win in February, “Nomadland” has sparked a storm of controversy in China. State media and social media alike initially blazed with pride and sought to claim Zhao’s historic success for China. But within days, social media users unearthed two previous interviews given by Zhao to foreign news outlets.

    In the first, Zhao told the Australian website news.com.au that “the U.S. is now my country.” Zhao’s last three films have been U.S. productions and Chinese netizens took her comments to mean that Zhao may no longer hold a Chinese passport. That section of the interview was online in December 2020, but had been deleted some time before Feb. 16, 2021.

    The second interview appeared in New York-based Filmmaker Magazine in 2013. Explaining why she chose to make a film (2015 drama “Songs My Brothers Taught Me”) about a Native American teen on a North Dakota reservation, Zhao said: “It goes back to when I was a teenager in China, being in a place where there are lies everywhere.” She added: “You felt like you were never going to be able to get out.

    “A lot of info I received when I was younger was not true, and I became very rebellious toward my family and my background,” said the director. The comments had been removed from the magazine’s website by Feb. 15, 2021.

    “Nomadland” has been penciled in for an April 23 release in China. But it’s no longer certain that it will go ahead.

    The trajectory of “Better Days” is less controversial, but just as twisty.

    Directed by Hong Kong-based director Derek Tsang, the film is a mainland China-set melodrama that mixes up a school bullying tale with a story of mismatched love. It was set to have its world premiere in February 2019 at the Berlin Film Festival, but at the last minute it was withdrawn by its production team, amid messages of regret from Tsang. No meaningful explanation was ever advanced, but it seems likely that the gutsy telling of disaffected youth caused Chinese authorities to rethink the permission given for it to screen overseas.

    After a couple more false starts, “Better Days” was allowed to release in Chinese theaters, where it proved to be a smash hit, earning RMB1.55 billion ($238 million).

    That does not mean authorities were cool with the film. Mainland China favored an overtly patriotic sports drama “Leap” as its Oscar contender. That left Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Area belonging to China, to select “Better Days.”

    In recent days, arts and culture have become the center of another storm in Hong Kong, where pro-Beijing forces are politically ascendant.

    On Monday, under pressure from Beijing-loyal newspapers, cinemas and arts centers in Hong Kong canceled planned commercial screenings of “Inside the Red Brick Wall,” another award-winning documentary about the pro-democracy protest movement. It was accused of breaching the National Security Law by stirring up hatred for the Hong Kong police and for China.

    On Wednesday, it was the turn of broadcaster RTHK and the West Kowloon Cultural District’s museums to be attacked by Beijing supporters.

    New People’s Party lawmaker Eunice Yung claimed that upcoming shows at the WKCD’s M+ Museum are causing great concern to many members of the public, because they are “spreading hatred” against China. “How come there will be display of art pieces that are suspected to have breached the national security law and also are an insult to the country?” Yung asked in the Legislative Council.

    Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam responded by saying that authorities will be “on full alert” to make sure museum exhibitions in Hong Kong do not undermine national security.

    “I’m sure staff are able to tell what is freedom of artistic expression and whether certain pieces are really meant to incite hatred or to destroy relations between two places (Hong Kong and mainland China) and undermine national security,” Lam said.
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  3. #63
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    And the winner is...

    It's nearly impossible to be a-political anymore, but when a doc is very political, well, we'll see what the Academy thinks tonight...

    Film on 2019 Hong Kong protests vies for Oscars, riles China
    Do Not Split does not shy away from the violence of the protests, but at its heart is the emotional toll on the young people struggling to protect the city they love.


    Do Not Split's Oscar nomination has riled China [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    By
    Kate Mayberry
    25 Apr 2021
    Growing up in Hong Kong, Joey Siu imagined she might become a secondary school teacher, but two years ago, as pro-democracy protesters filled the streets of the Chinese-ruled city, she found herself taking a different path.

    Siu joined the rallies as a student activist, but quickly took on a more prominent role in the movement, advocating for international help and speaking regularly to the media.

    Then, in June last year, China imposed the National Security Law – broadly worded legislation it said was necessary to deal with secession, terrorism, subversion and “collusion with foreign powers”.

    Overnight, social media accounts were closed, pro-democracy groups shut down. The protests, already quietened by the coronavirus pandemic, evaporated.

    Some chose exile. Siu agonised for weeks about what to do.

    “I never really thought about leaving Hong Kong this soon,” the now-21-year-old told Al Jazeera from Washington, DC, where she eventually settled in October last year. “I always thought I would have a career in Hong Kong, and a future and that it would be the city I would live in permanently.

    “[But] I realised if I chose to leave Hong Kong, I could do more for Hong Kong.”

    The tumultuous political developments in the Chinese territory, Siu’s own growth as an activist and the emotional toll on the protesters as they struggle for the city they love are at the heart of Do Not Split, the 35-minute film by Norwegian director Anders Hammer that is in contention for best short documentary at the Oscars on Sunday.

    ‘No way to defend ourselves’
    Described by Variety as “visceral, up close and personal”, Hammer went down to the streets to film alongside the protesters and capture not only the unpredictability of the protests, but their raw emotion.


    A still from Do Not Split by Anders Hammer, which has been nominated for an Academy Award [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    From its opening with a group of black-clad protesters breaking into a Chinese-owned bank, to a group of police officers pushing a protester to the ground, flattening his cheek to the tarmac, his shirt ripped off, and his belly exposed, the film does not flinch from the increasing violence of the confrontations between police and protesters.
    Throughout there are clouds of tear gas, sprays of water cannon and the putt-putt of rubber bullets.

    Siu remembers how the protesters struggled with how to deal with the police’s escalating response.

    “When the movement first broke out most of the protesters, including myself, were new,” she said. “We did not know how to deal with tear gas, rubber bullets and everything.”

    At first, the police gave the crowds the space to disperse and return home, but then their tactics changed, she remembers.

    Protesters often found themselves boxed in under volleys of tear gas, water cannon and rubber bullets. Some protesters were shot with live ammunition.

    The government had also made clear those arrested could be charged with rioting, an offence punishable with a jail term of as many as 10 years.

    “There was really no way to defend ourselves, other than by also deploying a certain level of force,” Siu said.

    Emotional toll
    Hammer arrived in Hong Kong in June 2019, and – apart from a quick trip back to Norway to collect more gear – spent weeks on the ground.

    While some of the violence was disturbing – Hammer points to the standoff with police at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, which was besieged in November – it was the spirit and determination of the protesters that most affected him.

    “Seeing the stress, the desperation and how protesters were trying to still keep hope even though it was becoming more and more difficult for them to protest and they could see very clear signs that Hong Kong was developing in the opposite way than they were fighting for,” he told Al Jazeera.


    Anders Hammer on location in Hong Kong filming, Do Not Split. He decided to go onto the streets, build trust with the protesters and film alongside them [Courtesy of Oliver Haynes]
    “They wanted to protect and keep the city as they knew it and they were fighting against this closer relationship with Beijing. And they were protesting because they felt their basic democratic rights were disappearing.”
    Hammer gives space for the protesters to talk about their motivations and their sense of betrayal.

    “The British handed us over to China like a bag of potatoes,” one says of the United Kingdom, which ruled Hong Kong as a colony until 1997.

    Siu is shown wrestling with the psychological impact of the unfolding events.

    “When our own city is decayed, [and] falling apart,” she tells Hammer. “What is the point of us thinking about our future.”

    The 2019 protests began against a Hong Kong government plan to allow suspects to be sent for trial in mainland China, where the courts are controlled by the Chinese Communist Party.

    A million people marched through the streets of the city on June 9, and nearly double that the following week – the biggest protest in the territory’s history – but it was not until September that chief executive Carrie Lam finally withdrew the bill.

    ‘Dark times’
    The rallies did not emerge out of nowhere, however. Hong Kong people had long been chafing at Beijing’s tightening grip.


    At the handover, the country’s Communist Party leaders had promised to respect the territory’s rights and freedoms – unknown in the mainland – for at least 50 years.

    Before the 2019 protests, the biggest demonstration in the territory had been 16 years earlier against plans to introduce a national security law, which were then dropped by the government.

    Demands for universal suffrage – a key demand of the 2019 protests – and the right to choose the city’s leader have periodically erupted into mass demonstrations, notably in 2014 when tens of thousands joined a peaceful 79-day sit-in in the heart of the city, after Beijing declared the territory did not have autonomy.

    “I felt this was one of the most important events in international politics at the time,” Hammer said of why he decided to go to Hong Kong in 2019. “I still think it is.”

    The protests had already cooled even before the National Security Law was imposed, but critics have said the legislation has effectively criminalised even legitimate forms of political dissent.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  4. #64
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    continued from previous post



    Protesters with a petrol bomb in a still from, Do Not Split. While Anders Hammer’s film shows the violence of the protests, he says he was most affected by the emotional and psychological stress that the protesters felt [Anders Hammer/Courtesy of Sundance Institute]
    In January, some 50 politicians, activists and academics were arrested in police raids over a primary election they had organised in July 2020 to help the democratic camp choose the strongest candidates for a Legislative Council election that was then delayed.

    Since then, Beijing has rewritten the rules on the territory’s elections to ensure only “patriots” can hold office.

    “I feel sorry for Hong Kong,” Hammer said, noting that two of those arrested appeared in his film. “These are dark times. The developments we are covering in the documentary in the sense that the room for democracy is shrinking have just continued.”

    The continuing crackdown, which has even ensnared veteran lawyer and politician Martin Lee who helped draft Hong Kong’s post-colonial constitution, has further deepened divisions between China and western democracies including the United States, the UK and European Union.

    China anger at Oscars
    Unsurprisingly, the Oscar nomination for Do Not Split has caused upset in Beijing.

    An article in the Global Times, a Communist Party-controlled tabloid, dismissed the film as a “fake” documentary that “lacked artistry” and was “full of biased political stances”. Nominating such a film would “hurt the feelings” of Chinese audiences, it said.

    The Oscars will not be shown on the mainland, while the Hong Kong broadcaster TVB blamed “commercial” reasons for its decision not to broadcast the ceremony for the first time in more than half a century.

    “Our main aim in making this documentary was to bring attention to the critical situation in Hong Kong,” Hammer said. “Ironically, the censorship of the Oscars and the attention brought to our documentary has resulted in more stories about the critical situation in Hong Kong so Beijing is helping us.”


    Joey Siu testifies during a Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Border Security and Immigration in December. The hearing was held to examine Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement through US refugee policy [Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images via AFP]
    Siu now works at international advocacy group Hong Kong Watch, where she has addressed politicians in the US and further afield on the situation in Hong Kong, which she is convinced China wants to make into just “another, ordinary mainland Chinese city”.
    She is worried about the place she was forced to flee, but finds comfort in the new ways people in Hong Kong are resisting, and that democratic governments appear increasingly willing to defend and stand up for their values and way of life.

    “I am pretty motivated and encouraged to see, that either here in the States or in other countries, like in Europe, people are starting to realise that this strategy we have been taking for years is wrong and that we have to be taking a much tougher and also more comprehensive approach to deal with China,” she said.

    It is a long way from the quiet life of a teacher.

    SOURCE: AL JAZEERA

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