Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 567
Results 91 to 97 of 97

Thread: the Kentucky Fried Thread

  1. #91
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,310

    ...or not...

    2020. The year of flops.

    Companies
    Yum China flops in Hong Kong debut amid lingering questions about strategy for KFC, Pizza Hut to overcome Covid-19 slump
    Shares of the Shanghai-based company began trading at HK$410, a slight discount to the HK$412 that they were offered at in their HK$17.27 billion (US$2.23 billion) secondary listing on the Hong Kong stock exchange
    The stock fell by as much as 6.3 per cent to an intraday low of HK$386.20 in recent trading, ending the day at HK$390.20
    Daniel Ren
    Alison Tudor-Ackroyd
    Daniel Ren in Shanghai and Alison Tudor-Ackroyd
    Published: 12:00pm, 10 Sep, 2020


    Pedestrians walk past a Pizza Hut restaurant and a KFC restaurant, both operated by Yum China Holdings in Beijing on Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020. Photo: Bloomberg

    Yum China Holdings, the owner of the KFC and Pizza Hut restaurant chains in China, got off to a bumpy start in its Hong Kong trading debut when its stock became the first in a long while to open at a loss.
    Shares of the Shanghai-based company began trading at HK$410, a slight discount to the HK$412 that they were offered at in their HK$17.27 billion (US$2.23 billion) secondary listing on the Hong Kong stock exchange. The stock fell by as much as 6.3 per cent to an intraday low of HK$386.20 in recent trading before ending its first trading day at HK$390.20 to record an unusual loss for retail investors who have subscribed to it.
    “The first-day performance was slightly below market expectations, but it would not damp investors’ enthusiasm in secondary listings,” said He Yan, a hedge fund manager with Shanghai Shiva Investment. “Companies with strong consumer awareness on the mainland are among the favourite stocks for Chinese investors.”
    The flop in Yum China’s Hong Kong debut draws a stark contrast with a spate of bumper initial public offerings (IPO) in the city, where stocks gained 50 per cent or more in value when they changed hands for the first time. Just this week, Nongfu Spring successfully completed its HK$8.35 billion IPO, setting the record as the most overbought offer in Hong Kong’s financial history with 1,147 times more investors submitting bids than available shares. The water bottler’s stock debuted at an 85 per cent premium to its offer price.

    Yum China’s offering comes as restaurants worldwide are still struggling with social distancing regulations to contain the global coronavirus pandemic.
    The chain is betting that its franchise of 10,000 restaurants across 1,400 cities and townships in mainland China stand a better chance of succeeding than other markets, as the nation became the first major economy to emerge from the coronavirus lockdown.


    Pedestrians walk past a KFC restaurant operated by Yum China Holdings in Beijing on Saturday, Sept. 5, 2020. Photo: Bloomberg

    The Covid-19 pandemic has posed a huge challenge to the restaurant industry and investors were keen on hearing answers to the question of how the management weathered through the challenges and recovery of operating results, said Huang Peihao, head of equity capital markets in Asia for UBS.
    “Through a secondary listing in Hong Kong, the company attracted Asian time-zone investors, including those from Hong Kong, mainland China, and Singapore. The secondary listing also facilitates a closer tie with Yum China’s customers,” said Huang, whose bank UBS is joint global coordinator with Goldman Sachs, Citigroup and CMB International for Yum China’s stock offer. “We believe these will support the company‘s medium and long-term development.”
    For now, investors appear unconvinced. The Hong Kong shares fell by as much as 3 per cent on the Bright mart grey market overnight, before transactions formally began in the city, signalling that the stock would open at a discount. Yum China’s US-traded American depositary receipts rose 1.7 per cent overnight to US$53.20 in New York.
    Yum China posted a 51.5 per cent drop in profit for the first six months of this year, earning US$194 million.
    The company granted the underwriters of its international offering an overallotment option to purchase up to an additional 6.3 million shares at the offer price. If the overallotment is fully exercised, the company would raise an additional HK$2.56 billion.


    Daniel Ren
    Daniel Ren is the SCMP's Shanghai bureau chief. A Shanghai native, Daniel joined the SCMP in 2007 as a Business reporter.

    Alison Tudor-Ackroyd
    Alison is the Post's Finance Editor. Previously, she was Managing Editor of FinanceAsia; The Wall Street Journal's Asia Pacific Senior Finance Correspondent and before that Reuters' Asia Private Equity Correspondent. She has more than 20 years' experience reporting on finance while based in London, Milan, Paris, Tokyo and now Hong Kong. Alison has moderated panels at numerous summits from Sibos, Milken to Rise. In 2018, she was named Fintech Journalist of the Year and won Outstanding Contribution to Journalism in Asian press awards.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #92
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,310

    It would be pretty funny to toss one into someone's fireplace...

    It's back.

    The KFC Yule log is back and disgusting as ever


    Fill your home with the smell of a greasy fast food chain this holiday season.Fill your home with the smell of a greasy fast food chain this holiday season.IMAGE: ENVRIO-LOG
    BY MILLER KERNMASHABLE SHOPPING
    19 HOURS AGO
    The air is getting colder as we approach the cozy winter months and if you breathe in deep you can catch a whiff of that crisp fall air. Wait, no. That’s crispy chicken we’re smelling.

    That’s right — the KFC 11 Herbs & Spices firelog is back, baby. This absolutely cursed log is made for fireplaces, fire pits, and wood stoves and will make your home smell like greasy fried chicken. And who wouldn’t want that?

    Warning: The product description says burning the log may result in a craving for fried chicken. It also reminds you that while the firelog smells great (that’s questionable) you should not attempt to eat it — because we know that would be your first instinct, right?

    The KFC log burns for up to three unbearable hours and is made from 100% recycled materials, which is a cool move on KFC’s part. While the firelog wouldn’t make the cut for most holiday gift guides, it does actually make for a pretty good white elephant gift.

    And the best part? The KFC 11 Herbs & Spices firelog is on sale for $15.88, down from $19.98. It’s not much of a savings, but it’s better than paying full price for something that will likely be a gag gift. Emphasis on the "gag." (And if you truly do enjoy the scent, there’s no judgment here. Well, maybe a little.)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #93
    Gosh! It's my all-time favorite.

  4. #94
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,310

    Slightly OT

    ...or not... I'm pescatarian because I'm Buddhist and I'm not sure how to deal with this.

    Singapore approves lab-grown 'chicken' meat
    Published12 hours ago
    Eat Just chicken nuggets
    Singapore has given regulatory approval for the world’s first “clean meat” that does not come from slaughtered animals.

    The decision paves the way for San Francisco-based startup Eat Just to sell lab-grown chicken meat.

    The meat will initially be used in nuggets, but the company hasn’t said when they will become available.

    Demand for alternatives to regular meat has surged due to consumer concerns about health, animal welfare and the environment.

    According to Barclays, the market for meat alternatives could be worth $140bn (£104bn) within the next decade, or about 10% of the $1.4tn global meat industry.

    Plant-based meat options such as Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are increasingly found on supermarket shelves and restaurant menus.

    But Eat Just’s product is different because it is not plant based, but instead grown from animal muscle cells in a lab.

    Breakthrough
    The company called it a "breakthrough for the global food industry" and hopes other countries will now follow suit.

    Over the last decade, dozens of start-ups have attempted to bring cultured meat to market, hoping to win over conventional meat eaters with the promise of a more ethical product.

    Two of the largest are Israel-based Future Meat Technologies and the Bill Gates-backed Memphis Meats, which are both trying to enter the market with affordable and tasty lab grown meats.

    Singapore’s Shiok Meats is working on lab grown crustacean meats.

    While many have touted the environmental benefits, some scientists have suggested it might be worse for climate change under some circumstances.

    Challenges ahead
    By Mariko Oi, BBC News Singapore

    The boss of Eat Just called it "one of the most significant milestones in the food industries" but challenges remain.

    Firstly, it is much more expensive to produce lab-grown meat than plant-based products.

    Case in point: Eat Just previously said it would sell lab-grown chicken nuggets at $50 each.

    The cost has since come down but it will still be as expensive as premium chicken.

    Another challenge for the company is the reaction of consumers.

    But Singapore's approval of Eat Just's product will likely attract competitors to set up operations in the city state, and it could also prompt other countries to approve it, too.

    Presentational grey line
    Safe ‘novel food’
    The Singapore Food Agency (SFA) said an expert working group reviewed data on Eat Just’s manufacturing control and safety testing of the cultured chicken.

    “It was found to be safe for consumption at the intended levels of use, and was allowed to be sold in Singapore as an ingredient in Eat Just’s nuggets product,” the SFA said.

    The agency said it has put in place a regulatory framework for “novel food” to ensure that cultured meat and other alternative protein products meet safety standards before they are sold in Singapore.

    “I'm sure that our regulatory approval for cultured meat will be the first of many in Singapore and in countries around the globe,” said Josh Tetrick, the Eat Just co-founder in a media release.

    No antibiotics were used in the process, and the chicken had lower microbiological content than conventional chicken, the company said.

    “The first-in-the-world regulatory allowance of real, high-quality meat created directly from animal cells for safe human consumption paves the way for a forthcoming small-scale commercial launch in Singapore,” Eat Just said.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #95
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,310

    This thread is weird

    It keeps surprising me. Lopez? Really?

    Dec 7, 2020 5:00am PT
    Colonel Sanders’ Next KFC Commercial is Also a Steamy Lifetime Drama

    By Brian Steinberg


    Courtesy of A+E Networks

    Colonel Harland Sanders has for decades captured the fancy of the American public, usually over the course of dozens of 30-second commercials for KFC that break into TV programs. On Sunday, he won’t have to interrupt any longer.

    He’s getting his own show.

    Mario Lopez will star as the nation’s best-known fried-chicken spokesman in a steamy Lifetime “mini-movie” that hinges less on the chain’s “secret recipe” of 11 herbs and spices and more on dysfunctional family dynamics and forbidden love. And while the Lifetime program, “A Recipe for Seduction,” has all the hallmarks of one of the A+E-owned cable outlet’s high-drama potboilers, it is in essence a 15-minute commercial for the Yum Brands restaurant.

    Most advertisers hope their commercials will spur consumers to buy their products after they see the spots. But KFC will use promotions for “Seduction,” which airs at noon on December 13, to order lunch. People who order KFC on Uber Eats for delivery can get six of the chain’s extra crispy tenders for free when they make a purchase totaling more than $20.

    “We always want our brand to show up in interesting and unexpected ways in popular culture,” KFC said in a prepared statement. “The KFC and Lifetime mini-movie event is a perfect way to bring fans a fun opportunity to enjoy the holidays with family, friends, and loved ones.” KFC spent more than $195 million on traditional TV advertising in 2019, according to Kantar, a tracker of ad spending.

    “A Recipe for Seduction” is just the latest ingredient in a long-simmering stew cooked up by Madison Avenue to foil the increasing disdain the average TV viewer has for traditional commercials. Streaming-video venues like Netflix, Disney Plus and Hulu allow subscribers to watch their favorites with fewer ads – and in many cases none. If advertisers can come up with commercial concepts that are as compelling as the programming they barge in upon, so the thinking goes, they might get consumers to pay more attention than has become the norm.

    The Lifetime effort will look a lot like the stuff to which its fans might typically tune. Lopez is also starring in “FelizNoviDAD,” a network holiday movie that premiered last month and that will follow the KFC drama. After debuting on the network, “A Recipe for Seduction” will continue to be available throughout the holiday season on mylifetime.com/christmas-movies, and at all Lifetime apps, and video-on-demand platforms.

    “Through a terrific cast, and with a wink to the unique sensibilities celebrated in Lifetime movies, this co-production spotlights each brand’s POV and marries them in a fun and authentic way,” says David DeSocio, executive vice president of ad sales marketing and partnerships at A+E Networks. The ad agency Wieden + Kennedy helped produce the KFC program.

    Other advertisers have aspired to create commercials that try to look like independent content. NBC on November 25 aired a one-hour special co-produced by L’Oreal that celebrated female philanthropists. In 2014, WarnerMedia’s HLN aired a six-part reality series, “Growing America,” that was co-produced by Holiday Inn. The hotel chain figured prominently in some of the challenges faced by participants in the series. Discovery that same year aired a program that examined the familiar plagues from the story of Moses. Viewers were not expressly told that the show, “Surviving Exodus,” was commissioned by 20th Century Fox to drum up attention for the release of its movie “Exodus: Gods and Kings.”

    Some efforts are decidedly more creative. Arby’s in 2014 released a 13-hour commercial talking about how it smoked brisket. The marathon spot played out only on a local MyNetwork affiliate in Duluth, Minn., but word of the stunt was enough to lure 350,000 unique visitors to watch the video on a website where the average visit lasted 38 minutes.

    Yum Brands and KFC have long tested these waters. The chicken emporium made Colonel Sanders the star of several bespoke titles from DC Comics in 2015 and 2017 that put him alongside characters such as Green Lantern and the Flash. The company was a charter sponsor of “The Ocho,” ESPN’s celebration of off-kilter sports probably best left to the sidelines ,and in 2018 supported those efforts with longer-form vignettes that had sportscasters John Buccigross and Kenny Mayne holding forth on an “ESPN Ocho” set introducing new contests in which top athletes try to accomplish their feats while wearing KFC’s signature buckets.

    The parent company is certainly cognizant of the power of movies and movie trailers. In 2018, it ran a series of ersatz movie trailers for the debut of its Taco Bell Nacho Fries, realizing TV viewers tended to pay more attention to coming attractions than they did to ads for floor polish or toothpaste.

    KFC will face a challenge of a different sort when the movie runs on Sunday. Program ratings from Nielsen will be readily available within 24 hours – letting Lifetime as well as a host fast-food competitors understand quickly just how many people watched the steamy chicken drama in real time. KFC’s fried-fowl recipe may be secret, but one measure of its commercial’s success will not be.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #96
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    It keeps surprising me. Lopez? Really?
    Will she really be? Awesome!

  7. #97
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,310

    KFConsole

    This thread...KFC marketing...I can't even.

    KFC has created a console that's more powerful than the PS5 and has a built-in 'chicken chamber' to keep your meal warm
    Kate Duffy Dec 23, 2020, 8:28 AM

    KFConsole heats up fried chicken. KFC

    KFC announced Tuesday the creation of a new gaming console, KFConsole, which has a built-in "chicken chamber" to keep food warm in while users play.

    The bucketlike console has a cooling system that transfers the heat from the components to the chicken chamber, keeping the hardware cool and the chicken warm.

    The chicken chain has partnered with Cooler Master, Intel, Asus, and Seagate to create the KFConsole.

    "If Sony or Microsoft want any tips on how to engineer a chicken chamber for their efforts next time, they'd be welcome to get in touch," the public-relations and social-media lead at KFC UK and Ireland said.
    Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

    The fast-food chain KFC has created a new high-end gaming console that comes with a built-in "chicken chamber" to keep your chicken warm while you play.

    KFC teamed up with Cooler Master to create the "KFConsole," the chicken chain said in a statement on Tuesday. It is essentially a high-end gaming PC with components made by Intel, Asus, and Seagate.

    It's a powerful machine: KFC says it can run games at 4K resolution at 240 frames per second — more than the PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X can manage. It can also run virtual-reality games, according to KFC and Cooler Master's website.

    The bucketlike console has a cooling system that transfers the heat produced by the components to the chicken chamber, helping to keep the hardware cool and the "finger lickin' good" chicken warm.

    "The Bargain Bucket-shaped machine features the world's first built in chicken chamber, which is kitted out to keep its contents hot, ready for consumption during intense gaming sessions," KFC said.


    The KFConsole chicken chamber. KFC
    Cooler Master didn't immediately respond to Business Insider's request for comment. An Intel spokesperson said they didn't have anything additional to share at this stage beyond the details on the Cooler Master website.

    The cost and release date of the KFConsole haven't yet been announced.

    It also includes an Intel Nuc 9 Extreme Compute Element and two Seagate BarraCuda 1TB SSD drives for storage, Cooler Master said.

    "This machine is capable of running games at top-level specs, all on top of keeping your meal warm for you to enjoy during your gaming experience ... what's not to like?" Mark Cheevers, the public-relations and social-media lead at KFC UK and Ireland, said in the statement.

    "If Sony or Microsoft want any tips on how to engineer a chicken chamber for their efforts next time, they'd be welcome to get in touch," he said.

    Stephen James, the global PR and influencer manager at Cooler Master, said in the press release: "When we were approached by KFC Gaming to make the KFConsole, we jumped at the chance to get involved and enter the console war."

    He added: "The KFConsole has been custom built with the gamer at the front of mind. The last thing we want is anyone to go hungry while playing!"

    One Twitter user responded to KFC's tweet by asking how "Cyberpunk 2077," which has sold more than 13 million copies, would run on the console. KFC replied: "It runs better than any console."

    This isn't the only mind-boggling invention KFC has come up with in recent years.

    In February, the fast-food chain collaborated with Crocs to create shoes with fried chicken painted on them, topped with a chicken-scented charm. The shoes sold out within half an hour after their launch in July.

    KFC announced the release of its 11 Herbs & Spices Firelog in December 2018 — basically a log that smells like fried chicken.

    Quote Originally Posted by highlypotion View Post
    Will she really be? Awesome!
    She? Mario is a boy but I can see where you might make that mistake...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •