Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011
Results 151 to 158 of 158

Thread: Yoga

  1. #151
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong for Back Pain

    Whenever the Tai Chi & Qigong newsfeeds have several articles on the same topic, it's the result of a recently published study. I always search for the original source to post here. This is the back pain study that's getting a lot of play right now.

    Holistic Nursing Practice. 34(1):3–23, JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020
    DOI: 10.1097/HNP.0000000000000360,
    PMID: 31725096
    Issn Print: 0887-9311
    Publication Date: January/February 2020
    A Narrative Review of Movement-Based Mind-Body Interventions: Effects of Yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong for Back Pain Patients

    Juyoung Park;Cheryl Krause-Parello;Chrisanne Barnes;

    Abstract
    This narrative literature review evaluated the effects of movement-based mind-body interventions (MMBIs; yoga, tai chi, and qigong) on low back pain. A search of databases was conducted to identify relevant studies. Thirty-two articles met inclusion criteria and were included for this narrative review. Of the reviewed studies, the highest number focused on yoga intervention (n = 25), 4 focused on qigong, and 3 focused on tai chi in managing back pain. The selected articles showed MMBI to be effective for treatment of low back pain, reporting positive outcomes such as reduction in pain or psychological distress (eg, depression and anxiety), and improved functional ability. However, little is known about the effects of MMBI, in particular qigong and tai chi. More clinical trials are needed to determine how to reduce back pain, improve physical function, and minimize behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with low back pain. Nurse practitioners may introduce such mind-body interventions for managing pain, especially for patients at high risk for adverse effects from pharmacological treatment, and refer them to a yoga therapist, tai-chi instructor, or qigong instructor.
    THREADS
    Qigong as Medicine
    Tai Chi as Medicine
    Yoga
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #152
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Unbanned

    This reminds me of when the Omei Kung Fu Headquarters in Milipitas sold to a Christian school. Founder Tony Chen had left for PRC to promote fights (which I beleive he is still doing) but they tried to maintain their martial arts program. Shi Yantuo stayed on for a while, but he wasn't allowed to do anything too Buddhist, which was a shame because he was very Buddhist, moreso than many Shaolin monks at the time, promoting sitting practice and tea practice.

    Alabama bill would undo ban on yoga in schools but prohibit 'namaste greetings'
    BY BROOKE SEIPEL - 03/06/20 04:50 PM EST 285


    © Getty Images

    A proposed Alabama House bill would undo a 1993 ban on yoga in K-12 public schools but would create strict rules on how the practice is instructed to students.

    The measure, introduced by Democratic state Rep. Jeremy Gray, has already passed in the Education Policy Committee with bipartisan support and is expected to be voted on by the House next week, according to NBC News.

    Under the rules proposed in the bill, school districts could choose to offer yoga as an elective class, but would require instruction to focus "exclusively to poses, exercises and stretching techniques" that are taught with "exclusively English descriptive names," meaning traditional Sanskrit names for poses would be taught using an English label. For example, vrksasana is usually referred to as tree pose.

    Under the rule, "chanting, mantras, mudras, use of mandalas, and 11 namaste greetings shall be expressly prohibited," and all instruction is "limited exclusively to poses, exercises, and stretching techniques."

    School districts would have their own discretion in whether to offer the classes and how often they are offered.

    In 1993, a law was passed banning yoga and other "meditation" practices in public schools, as well as the use of "hypnosis and dissociative mental states." Under the law, yoga was labeled a "Hindu philosophy" and a "method of religious training."

    Gray, a former professional football player, called yoga "a great way to work on your posture, flexibility, balance and to strengthen your core," and said many people didn't even know the 1993 law was in place.

    "I really don't see what the big deal is," Gray said of yoga. "I mean, my wife does this, my mother does this on the floor of her Methodist church."

    While the bill so far has bipartisan support, some Republicans are expected to oppose the measure.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #153
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    incompatible

    Greek Orthodox Church rules yoga is 'incompatible' with Christianity
    05 June 2020 Europe


    Image copyright
    Getty Images
    The Greek Orthodox Church is influential in politics and everyday life in Greece

    Downward dog, sun salutations and all other yoga practices are "absolutely incompatible" with the Christian faith, the powerful Greek Orthodox Church has said.
    Yoga has no place "in the life of Christians," the governing body of the Church has ruled.
    It said it intervened after Greek media recommended yoga as a way to combat stress during coronavirus quarantine.
    Other religions have also advised against the practice in the past.
    The Orthodox Church is an influential organisation in Greece, and 90% of Greeks identify as Orthodox , according to a 2017 Pew Research Centre report.
    "[Yoga] is a fundamental chapter in Hindu religion... it is not a 'kind of physical exercise'," the Holy Synod said in its statement on Wednesday.
    Although it is not unheard of for religious authorities to criticise yoga, correspondents say it is unusual for the Orthodox Holy Synod to issue a public statement on the matter.
    Appearing on a Greek TV network on Thursday, an Orthodox priest defended the Synod's statement.
    The church's opposition is based on the "experience of those who practised yoga", Father Michael Konstantinidis said, explaining that "if yoga offered what man wanted, we would be happy".
    The ancient spiritual practice has connections to Hinduism and Buddhism. It is referenced in Indian texts from 2,500 years ago and has evolved over time, according to Dr Mark Singleton, who has researched the history of yoga .
    In recent decades it has become popular globally and is now a huge industry, often advertised as beneficial for stress-relief, mental wellbeing or physical strength.
    Yoga has been recommended in countries around the world as a way to keep fit and combat stress during the Covid-19 pandemic.
    Greece avoided the worst of the coronavirus outbreak in Europe by introducing a lockdown early in March. It has registered fewer than 3,000 cases and only 180 deaths in a population of 11 million.
    The Orthodox Church was criticised for suggesting that the ritual of sharing a cup amongst a congregation for Holy Communion would not spread the virus.
    What do other religions say?
    The Greek Orthodox Church isn't the only faith to have frowned upon yoga.
    Last year a church hall in Devon, England, barred a yoga class . "Some will say at its root it is an eastern spirituality which they would not feel sits well with Christian spirituality," said the Venerable Mark Butchers, Archdeacon of Barnstaple.
    In 2010 a pastor in Seattle, US, called the practice "demonic".
    And in 2008 Malaysia's leading Islamic council said yoga could corrupt Muslims but backed down from issuing a fatwa after a backlash.
    I keep wondering when this exclusionism might spread to Tai Chi.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #154
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Tai Chi, Yoga & Meditation for veterans



    Study: Veterans May Benefit From Yoga, Tai Chi, Meditation
    By Traci Pedersen
    Associate News Editor Last updated: 26 Aug 2020
    ~ 2 MIN READ

    Complementary and integrative health (CIH) therapies, such as yoga, meditation and tai chi may help improve overall physical and mental health and reduce perceived stress among veterans receiving care in the Veterans Health Administration (VA) system, according to a new study published in a special September supplement to Medical Care.

    The study reports progress toward implementing CIH therapies throughout the VA system, part of an effort to promote a “Whole Health” approach in VA care. As required by the 2016 Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (CARA), the VA has expanded research and education on its CIH therapies, focusing on the impact on pain, mental health, and chronic illness.

    The study was led by Dr. A. Rani Elwy of the VA Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research at the Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital in Bedford, Mass, and Associate Professor in the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

    For the study, Elwy and team administered a 12-month survey to analyze the impact of CIH therapies on 119 veterans who self-reported on their health and well-being. The Veterans completed 401 surveys at more than five different time points during the study. The surveys focused on patient-reported outcomes (PROs), an important target for efforts to improve healthcare. They focused on the most important problems and outcomes identified by the patients themselves.

    Veterans in the study reported using 14 different CIH therapies. Yoga was the most popular, with nearly half of veterans participating. This was followed by meditation, acupuncture and tai chi. Three CIH therapies were linked to significant improvements in PROs:

    yoga was related to decreases in perceived stress;

    tai chi was linked to improvements in overall physical and mental health functioning, anxiety levels, and ability to participate in social role activities;

    meditation was also associated with improvements in physical functioning.

    “[O]ur study showed that meditation, tai chi, and yoga appear to improve overall physical and mental health and reduced perceived stress,” write the authors.

    None of the CIH therapies were linked to improvements in veterans’ pain intensity or level of engagement in their health care. Larger studies with longer follow-up times may be needed to show significant effects on these outcomes, according to the authors.

    “It is time to focus on health and well-being, as defined by Veterans, and reaching these goals must include participation in CIH treatment approaches,” concluded the authors.

    The paper presents 11 original research papers and commentaries on the VA’s progress in implementing and evaluating the impact of CIH therapies on Veterans’ health outcomes.

    The special issue addresses strategies to build support for and implement CIH programs, to evaluate their effectiveness, and to promote their long-term sustainability.

    “We already know that CIH therapies are effective for the treatment of Veterans’ chronic pain, posttraumatic stress, depression, and other chronic conditions,” write Elwy and Dr. Stephanie L. Taylor of the HSR&D Center for the Study of Healthcare Innovation, Implementation, and Policy, Greater Los Angeles VA Medical Center. “Now we need to develop, test, and use effective strategies to increase CIH use and sustainment.”

    In a commentary, Alison Whitehead and Dr. Benjamin Kligler of the VA Office of Patient-Centered Care and Cultural Transformation said, “As the VA continues to develop new and better ways of making CIH approaches available to all Veterans, and to collect data on the outcomes of this expanded access for Veterans and employees, we hope to demonstrate to the rest of the U.S. healthcare system how an emphasis on whole person care and self-management skills should become the new standard across the industry.”

    Source: Wolters Kluwer Health
    threads
    Tai-Chi-Veterans-amp-PTSD
    yoga
    meditation
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #155
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Yoga

    Enter to win Two YoQi DVDs by Marisa Cranfill. Contest ends 10/15/2020.



    threads
    yoqi
    yoga
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #156
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Our winners are announced

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #157
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Our latest sweepstakes. Enter to win!

    Enter to win 3 Qigong Flow for Happy Organs DVDs by Marisa Cranfill. Contest ends 11/16/2020.



    threads
    yoqi
    yoga
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #158
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Our winners are announced

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •