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Thread: Iron Palm

  1. #1
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    Iron Palm

    Hello, just wondering if anybody in here knows of anyone that trained in iron palm without using any dit dat jow? Is so, could you share with me what the outcome was? Is there any styles that include training in iron palm without any jow? How do they differ in training and application? Do they take longer to develop?
    A unique snowflake

  2. #2
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    all the cma versions i have heard of use dit da jow in ip training.

    in japanese styles, they do develop the hard striking hand without the use of medicines.

    styles such as Isshinryu, goju ryu have conditioning exercises for the hands that achieve approximately the same results. The callousing is part of it though and the hands can become damaged, especially when a person gets older.

    makawari practice, tree striking, breaking exercises etc are parts of many style of Karate and there wasn't until recently any medicines used except for massage, and hot water swirling with the hands.

    I think the Chinese method is the best personally. You can strike hard with it's practice and your hands don't betray your training because of the medicine.

    cheers
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  3. #3
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    IP TRAINING

    I know of a kung fu school here in sydney that dont use jow they think there chi kung/hei kung is good enough. HMMM 3 of there students have come to me so far to get there hands fixed with the YKM medicine. One guy was having chest problems that could have been related to the IP training from the shock from incorrect striking etc.

    I personally wouldnt train IP without my Dit dar jow.

    FT

  4. #4
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    Dit Da Jow

    I've got the address for some pretty good Jow . . . I'll post it tomorrow.
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    "Who dies first," he mumbled through smashed and bloody lips.

  5. #5
    iron palm without good chi kung can hurt the body.

    the ripply going back to the body is bad.

    iron palm can be learned without medicine. but you must have a good coach or risk getting hurt.

    learning thru a video wont make it.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies. I have a great Sifu and have no worries about injuring myself as his hands look fine and I follow his instructions as close as I can. However, I was just looking for some insights into common injuries or even case histories as to what can happen with improper instruction or practice. Thanks again.
    A unique snowflake

  7. #7
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    sc_guy

    I think that was what he was asking.

    I agree, the way that does it without the medicine to remove blood stasis and break up scar tissue will indeed carry forward into your autumn years and you will regret.

    But, to do it properly, that is to say, use medicine, use the prescribed gongs and use the correct method will give you significant striking power and will not damage your hands.

    cheers
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  8. #8
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    sc_guy

    I have been doing the training since I was first introduced to it in and around 96 I guess.

    Sifu, to the best of my knowledge has been doing it for years.

    I don't suffer any consequences at all. I use the mung bean bag, I use the falling hand method and over the last 2 years have used a little more force in the strikes as opposed to just letting it fall anymore.

    I have a sand bag now and incorporate stance training with the practice now. Shifting from bow to horse to bow as I strike.

    I use dit da jow, and I massage with frequency. I have no callouses and I do not have any joint pain, my hands are as buttery as any office worker out there

    I don't think that I or my sifu who taught me this experiences any adverse effects to it. I certainly have realized the benefits of the training. It has helped me understand alignment in striking and has really helped with being able to withstand the blowback force that is imminent when you strike.

    Besides this training, I also work Kiu Sao training with and Iron pole. I use brick toss and grab, sam sing on the same pole and on a tree (the tree is more forgiving.

    I roll a staff on my shins to help toughen those puppies up and also do kicks to the pole and tree.

    Dit Da jow, Hot water swirling, and plenty of massage will break up any and all hematomas that are occuring from the practice and actually, the healing practice takes more time on the clock than the actual striking exercises.

    I do use the Cranes head strikes to the bag, full finger tip strikes and have been doing so since I began. I suffer no ill effects to my vision and it has been about 8 years. The bag slapping is something that I do with regularity and the pole and tree work or more recent. If I could afford a decent mook jong I would probably use that instead of the tree.

    All, I'm saying is that if you approach it with caution and restraint, you can benefit in your martial skills from this practice.

    cheers
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #9
    In our system (Southern Sil Lum Black Tiger), it is recommended to use soya beans when progressing after mung beans, then steel shot almost 1/4 inch when progressing from SB's. Sand is not recommended as it compacts very easily and does not mold to the hand. This results in not all areas of the hand being trained. There is a very specific training regimen. It is not recommended to put force into any IP bag strike at any point in the training. Force=lack of internal energy flowing through the striking hand. The lack of flow can result in stuck and stagnant chi which is detrimental. Also, the force can transmit back up the arm and hit the tensed area resulting in injury to tissues and possibly the heart and lungs. Striking with the finger tips is okay as long as you do not go beyond your capability at that point in your training and cause damage to the nerve endings at the tips of the fingers. As well, it is not recommended to roll things along one's shin or forearms as this can result in damge to the nerves along the radius and dorsum of the wrist depending on the position of the arm in the roll. I know there are some schools that do this but not in Sil Lum Black Tiger. Hitting the shin on hard substances can also result in damage over time, but you can train the shin similar to the IP method and progress slowly and safely.

    GHD
    ...ask for Kam
    ------------------------------------------------
    "Fool me once, then shame on you. Fool me twice, then shame on me"

  10. #10
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    The force i am using to strike is not a "driving" or a deliberate intensified strike, it is derived from only alignment and focus.

    I don't want to totally desensitize, but i do want to ease the neuralgia that occurs naturally when striking. A strike hurts the striker too if not done properly. There are also exercises I do for wrists and arms that help with overall strength of the joints and tendons.

    From this practice, I have almost completely removed any tension from my strikes and can fluidly and quite loosely issue pretty good power.

    I imagine it will only get better with time and practice as anything does.

    For kicking on solid items, I started by wrapping a futon around the pole. After a while, i used thick felt blankets. After a while of that, I only had one blanket. The Iron pole will always win doesn't matter what level of skill you are So, caution and common sense really help in these types of exercises. It is very easy to incur damage so take it easy whatever you do and make your increments of change very small all the way up.

    cheers
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  11. #11
    The mung bean does nothing to cool the striking tissues), unless you drink a tea made from it. In fact, you do not want to cool your skin but to heat it everso slightly while reducing inflamation and this is part of what the dit da jow does. BBs are not very good to train with as they are usually coated or made of copper. They are also too small...as I said the training requirements are very specific. You switch from mung to soya as the soya is larger and more hard and this helps to prepare you for the steel shot.

    In Southern Sil Lum Black Tiger, we do not train (shins) this way (rolling shins, kicking poles etc.) at all, for the reasons I mentioned before, yet we have no problem with those who have trainied Mui Thai like by kicking poles, trees, rolled their shins...in fact we have techniques that the most such trained shins would not stand up to. In most fights, a person can clash shins and keep on going to end the altercation. I knew a person who had very hard shins and when clashed against anothers shin, the other person could still keep going and fighting...moral of this...hard shins will not end a fight. We do have Iron Body training that does include the legs and this suffices as far as the shins are concerned...but as I said, we do not recommend rolling the shins or kicking poles.

    GHD
    ...ask for Kam
    ------------------------------------------------
    "Fool me once, then shame on you. Fool me twice, then shame on me"

  12. #12
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    Re: Dit Da Jow

    Originally posted by Vash
    I've got the address for some pretty good Jow . . . I'll post it tomorrow.
    Not exactly tomorrow, but

    www.ditdajows.com

    http://www.yaukungmun.com.au/Dit%20Dar.htm

    That should be a good start.
    BreakProof BackŪ Back Health & Athletic Performance
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    "Who dies first," he mumbled through smashed and bloody lips.

  13. #13
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    I can vouch for the Yau Kung Mun jow. I've been using it with iron palm training for 2 years now and it certainly brings out brusing very quickly and speeds up the healing process. Great stuff.
    My intent is to kill you, my heart wants you dead, my mind thinks of you dead, when I strike its to kill you - Sifu.

    You are only as strong as your horse - Sigung Leung Cheung.

  14. #14
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    We don't carry a dit da jow at this time

    But we do carry an iron herb soak. Check it out.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #15
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    Just curious, but do any of you guys roll the iron bar down your forearms as well? Forearm knocking is a given....

    This thread has shaped up to be a very good read thus far.
    "i would show them 8 hours of animal porn and beheadings in a single sitting then make them write a paper about italy." -GDA
    "he said there were tons of mantids fornicating everywhere. While he was there, he was sending me photos of mantis porn regularly." - Gene Ching

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