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Thread: Fake Kung Fu?

  1. #31
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    Originally posted by cerebus
    Heh, heh! Yeah, Shou Shu, it's like a rash that JUST WON'T GO AWAY!
    Funny, I was thinking that about you!

  2. #32
    Heh, heh. Well, I'm flattered you were thinkin' of me! That's sweet of ya'.

  3. #33

    not far from the thoughts

    Cerebus we are always thinking about you. it just brightens our day when we see your posts. Single phrases, one word no matter we smile with anticipation for the next one liner.

    i have to say that university education is paying off by the way. your use of the Kem/npo is growing on me. LOL

    updated myself on the original 32 page thread for ya.

    Salute,

    SS Blue
    Fear Makes You Hesitate, Make Fear Your Allie and Make Your Enemy Hesistate!

  4. #34
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    I like Kenmpo myself.
    Those that are the most sucessful are also the biggest failures. The difference between them and the rest of the failures is they keep getting up over and over again, until they finally succeed.


    For the Women:

    + = & a

  5. #35
    The following is posted on the Shou Shu melange thread too.

    I never thought i would return.

    Salute,

    let me see if i can not help at all. It has already been posted from previous parts of this thread.

    One Shou Shu is the name our Da' Shifu gave the art in manderin is means Way of the Beast. to add fighting would add another charactor. It is not the name of what he was taught in China. He was taught 7 animals which are Xiong, Hu, You, BaHe, Tang, Fu, Long. There were only 5 individuals including Da' Shifu Moore Sr that graduated from the school that learned all 7 animals. He then named the style Shou Shu. Hence Moores Shou Shu. It has become a family art, the entire art is not taught to the public.

    look for the Animal Chuan in buddhist history. might be the beast chuan i was told it is in their artwork.

    If you look around at certain arts named after animals you will see the names i mentioned above.

    if a student did not learn all 7 animals he only called it what he was taught. Just as any art from china that was a family art unless the family accepted you as one of their own you werent taught their art.

    Some animals taught to Da' Shifu are not taught by other styles because of that styles master probably didnt see the practicality of it being taught or they didnt learn it. If a style didnt have the whole animal then it would have to draw from a different style to fill in the gaps.

    Shou Shu is effective under pressure.

    we are taught techs as a learning base, as our lessons progress we are encouraged to do reaction drills and mix our strikes while sparring. in turn its not the techniques we pay attention to in a fighting situation but the strikes we are taught from those techniques.


    Salute,

    SS Blue
    Fear Makes You Hesitate, Make Fear Your Allie and Make Your Enemy Hesistate!

  6. #36
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    I admit nothing

    Sensei Says by Patrick Blennerhassett
    Itís time to admit most traditional martial arts are fake and donít actually teach you how to fight
    Practising certain martial arts does not actually prepare you for an actual fight, and all the viral videos are finally exposing the so-called Ďkung fu fakeryí
    The real problem is regular people are being peddled traditional martial arts snake oil and are getting hurt or injured when they find themselves in a fight
    Patrick Blennerhassett
    Published: 10:00am, 24 Oct, 2019


    A tourist poses for a photo with the statue of Bruce Lee at the Avenue of Stars in Tsim Sha Tsui on the first day after its reopening. Photo: Sam Tsang

    I still remember my first ice hockey fight. All the movies Iíd watched as a kid, where highly choreographed fight scenes looked like expertly planned dance routines, had horribly lied to me. By the time I realised I was in a fight, at the tender age of 16, it was already half over and Iíd taken three or four solid shots to the face and my jersey had been pulled well over my head, rendering me blind.
    The experience was jarring: unfiltered chaos, blurred vision in one eye from an errant thumb poke, a ringing eardrum from getting punched in the side of the head, the taste of my own blood and swallowing a tooth. There was just disorganised, violent confusion with a skyrocketing heart rate and buckets of adrenaline.
    I held my breath as my body went into shock and when it was over I threw up in the penalty box from exhaustion, even though the whole thing lasted less than 45 seconds.
    After about a dozen or so, I started to get the hang of it and learned a few things: an actual fight is about survival. Fights do not happen in closed environments and any time to think is about the same amount of time it will take for your opponent to break your nose.



    In one fight, I remember getting my hand caught on my combatantís shoulder pad. I took three off the chin before I realised his pads were tied to his body and I could use them to take him to the ground. In another tilt, the first punch I threw shattered one of my knuckles on my opponentís visor and I had to learn how to be a southpaw in about two milliseconds. In one fight I ended up on the concrete ground at the rink as the trainer had forgotten to close the bench door because he was too busy watching the madness in front of him.
    What Iím getting at here is that Iím pretty sure no dojo or tai chi master teaches this. There are martial arts you practice in a vacuum, and there is being in a fight. These are two very different things. By no means am I an expert pugilist, but I've been in enough altercations to know things like meditation and flow states will get your head kicked in during a real bout.
    A fight is a visceral, primal experience and when you are fighting your physical doppelganger, you can get seriously hurt if you mess around even for a split second.
    Iíve watched enough of the same videos Iím sure you all have where a wing chun or kung fu master gets quickly dismantled by a mixed martial artist. The morbid curiosity has got the best of me many times even though I know the storyline: MMA, which teaches people to fight, is a far cry from other traditional disciplines which are heavy on the artistry.
    Still, I canít help myself in watching these beat downs because I think it exposes an important fallacy floating around the martial arts world: that going to a couple of karate classes or learning moves from a wing chun master will help you in an actual fight, be it in a ring, octagon or out on the street.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #37
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    Continued from previous post



    While the recent documentary The Game Changers talks about former UFC fighter James Wilksí experience in investigating plant-based diets, one part of the film stuck with me. Wilks remembers being young and getting into his first street fight after taking years of karate and getting rightly pummelled. It was a watershed moment for the fighter and it should ring true for many within the fighting world. You donít know how ill-equipped you actually are against a much better fighter until you are brutally exposed in embarrassing fashion.
    The important thing is not to throw the baby out with the bathwater. Karate is great for things like self-confidence, discipline, meditation and various other life skills. Wing chun can teach you how to control your mind, regulate your breathing and helps with stretching and toning muscles. These disciplines work around relaxing and centering the psyche, which is incredibly beneficial for kids who have attention issues and adults who have anxiety and stress.
    But the buck needs to stop there. Mixed martial artists, pioneered by Bruce Lee himself, have come on the scene as taking the best of various disciplines, from taekwondo to boxing, from jiu-jitsu to Muay Thai, and combining them with the purpose of teaching people how to fight, and more importantly, defend themselves properly from other fighters.

    The kung fu fakery needs to stop. I donít care about the fraudsters out there peddling themselves as invincible Ė watching them get exposed makes me giddy with glee. Iím worried about the kids and even adults being taught bogus lessons in various disciplines around the world. I had to learn how to fight the hard way, and luckily I escaped with nothing more than some nasty facial scars and a few horror stories. If I never raise my fists to fight again in my life, I will count it as a serious blessing.
    Others arenít as fortunate and have got seriously hurt or injured being peddled martial arts snake oil by false idols, and this is where this whole debate becomes anything but a laughing matter.
    Thoughts everyone?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Thoughts everyone?
    This guy hasn’t said anything in his article that hasn’t already been rehashed to death a million times already. I would agree that a lot of what’s in MA and how it’s taught in many MA schools isn’t going to help much in a real fight, but to make a sweeping statement that all MA and all MAists outside of MMA are ineffective frauds is stupid. It depends on how one is taught and how one is trained, and how it’s used in a given situation. It’s that simple. The article writer and whoever he got to back up his claims sounds bitter because he could not make it work for himself.

    I dunno. I’m no great MA prodigy or anything, but I’ve been in a couple street fights as well as one life-or-death situation against 3 men, and my training never failed me but one time, and that one time it was actually me who failed myself. The incident I failed myself in was the one time I was slightly drunk and got sucker punched from the side. Even then, I wasn’t hurt. But it shouldn’t have happened in the first place. In that case, it was my own lack of awareness (and therefore my own dumb fault), and not my training. Also, way too many TMAists and MMAists and MMA hangers-on seem unable to distinguish between ‘street brawls’ and legitimate, unavoidable self-defense situations. Macho, chest-thumping street brawling is stupid. If you go around getting into street brawls because you think you should be able to kick anyone’s ‘arse’ because you’ve had some training, then you probably deserve to get “rightly pummeled” at some point. The guy should be glad he wasn’t shot, stabbed or stomped into a coma.

    I freely admit that the fights I got into as a young man were stupid and avoidable. That sucker punch I got had been avoidable. The life and death struggle had not been; it happened very fast. In retrospect, had my radar been working in condition red, I would have seen the setup, but I didn’t (who is constantly in condition red, anyway?), and luckily things worked out in my favor, and it was due to my MA training and my will to survive. But my experiences differ from the author’s, so I guess that makes me a fraud. That’s OK; at least I’m still alive.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 10-24-2019 at 08:59 AM.

  9. #39
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    ttt 4 2020

    Wushu practitioner says martial arts show was parody of Ďfake mastersí
    Source: Global Times Published: 2020/7/27 18:43:40


    A self-proclaimed wushu (martial arts) master in Linyi, East China's Shandong Province, knocks down four opponents by waving a writing brush. Photo: Screenshot of a video posted by the Paper

    A video clip showing a self-proclaimed wushu (martial arts) master knocking down four opponents by waving a writing brush has gone viral online. The "master" later explained that the match was actually a show satirizing so-called fake martial arts masters.

    In the video of a wushu match in Linyi, East China's Shandong Province, posted by the Paper on Friday, He Weiyue, the wushu master, waved his writing brush and repeatedly KO'd four strong opponents, using exaggerated movements, voice and expressions.

    The local wushu association published a statement on July 19 condemning the attention-seeking show, saying that they have launched an investigation into the illegally held hyped match.

    He told media that the show was just a parody. "I was invited to perform a parody of those popular fake 'masters' and I performed as requested before the match."

    He also added that as a wushu practitioner himself, he despises the so-called wushu masters. "I call myself master just to be ironic, just for fun, like a sketch show."

    Netizens find it sarcastic that his attempt at irony failed. "It's so ironic that they don't punish the fake masters, but punish a comedian for being ironic," read one comment.
    I'd like to see the vid.

    Or maybe not...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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