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Thread: Wushu

  1. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by PangQuan
    now when you are going to take your son, and turn him into a fighter, you do not throw him to the wolves. in those days a fight could easily mean death, or worse. often the fight was with a melee weapon. this is the globe around, not just china.
    People have trained fencing for centuries without form. All you need are two sticks.

    Every system has core moves that must be trained all the time, with a partner or by yourself. You do this to keep the machine well oiled, to train the mind and body .... that's why boxers shadow box, wrestlers and fencers have a form of this too. But I would not equate this to wushu.

    I would equate most of the form I see in CMA today to wushu. I keep hearing how it prepares you and conditions you for fight.... this is just not true. How many competitve fights have these people based this theory on?

    There's nothing more taxing than being in the ring. The No. 1 thing is nerves. And the only thing to help you with that is experience, being calm in combat. Two, all the pulling, pushing and leverage -- hitting and being hit .... please don't compare that to form.

    As for the coordination and movement, look, any MA will have it. But you don't need all that movement, sometimes too much movement, too loose is no good ... you get tied up like a pretzel. Do you think Ali could perform today's wushu sets in his prime?

    I'm sorry, I'm saying it: These people promoting form are promoting the thing they're comfortable with and trying to tie it to the thing they want .... martial proficiency. But look at the people that are doing what they want to do at a high level ..... none of them are doing form.

    Am I the only one that sees this? Is this not clear as day?

    I'm not saying fight to learn fighting. I'm saying focus on specific principles and qualities and train them like mad. I know those are in the form but it doesn't seem to be working for most CMAs. Maybe it's time to change the model.

  2. #77
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    the form is good for conditioning. that is what i see as its primary function. only actual resistance training with a live partener will help to prepare you for combat. but only combat will seal the deal on your skills.

    true, un bias combat, cannot even be prepared for through means other than actual combat. which is very seldom participated in today, except by armed forces in general.

    forms will condition the body and provide mechanical study, sparring will develop a better understanding of fighting and resisting elements, fighting (such as for sport, or fun) will help to create a foundation for combat, yet only combat can give you the experience to truly understand combat.

    for example, how many modern sport fighters could stand against general lu bu in a one on one match. very few if any. he was forged through battle on the field of blood. he probably never practiced form from another, but he likely had his own solo routines he would go through with his great halberd.

    there are levels, and there are processes.

    even the western fencer will go through techniques solo in the air, same as a chinese. chinese just like to put their forms together. the form is not the long sequence of movements. this is a common mis conception. that is a sequence of forms. when you use one technique, that is a form. the form by which that particular technique is held. much like a form used in construction. each form has a multitude of other forms that will flow easily from it. thus the sequence.

    I in no way condone training solely through form training, yet i do feel it has a small place. if you want style that is. some would surely argue that style is a bad idea.

    for me, personally, i highly enjoy the shaolin sets that i know. I plan to learn all 10 from my master, as well as the personalized one i will recieve at the end of my training with him. i do learn other forms, i dont highly care for them myself.

    i know within myself i have already decided BJJ is my next step. I, like many others, have been highly influenced by the philosophies of JKD. Im creating my foundation, and form work is part of the foundation i have chosen. its like the little rocks you find in concrete. they dont need to be there, but they have substance all the same.
    A man has only one death. That death may be as weighty as Mt. Tai, or it may be as light as a goose feather. It all depends upon the way he uses it....
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    Master pain, or pain will master you.
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  3. #78
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    ray,

    i do have to say i enjoy conversating with you, you always push the subject into reality, and express yourself in a dignified manner. that is a rare quality.

    i have learned much since starting my practice of CMA, i have all but forgotten my fencing training.

    i studied fencing for 5 years. (japanese style weapon, bokken) though under no teacher, unfortunately. yet in the 5 years i studied, it was all done through live practice with several good friends. ive broken fingers, split heads, busted nose, and various other injuries, but put a stick in my hand and i garantee you a good match.

    Granted i feel that i have decent live combat skills with that particular weapon, i can tell that with a master drilling form work, my cuts would be much stronger, and with more precision.

    would i trade the power and precision for my fighting knowledge? no...as long as i have enough to get the job done, i would rather be able to get my moderate strikes in and connect.
    A man has only one death. That death may be as weighty as Mt. Tai, or it may be as light as a goose feather. It all depends upon the way he uses it....
    ~Sima Qian

    Master pain, or pain will master you.
    ~PangQuan

    "Just do your practice. Who cares if someone else's practice is not traditional, or even fake? What does that have to do with you?"
    ~Gene "The Crotch Master" Ching

    You know you want to click me!!

  4. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by PangQuan
    Granted i feel that i have decent live combat skills with that particular weapon, i can tell that with a master drilling form work, my cuts would be much stronger, and with more precision..
    I agree if by form you mean training the movements that generate power, such as collapsing the rib, the whole torso going down with your strike. I'm not sure I'd agree if you're talking about doing a "broadsword set", with rolls and jumping spin kicks, etc.

    I really don't know weapons much, but saw a little when I first started my training with my master. Here's an example of form vs something else.

    I had a friend who moved to Arizona and trained kali stick fighting for about a year and a half.

    I learned stick for about a week, but learned some major principles, such as don't lead with your hand, lead with the stick, two sides of a triangle are longer than the remaining side, etc.

    So this dude comes back and wants to show off his stick play. I say cool, bring over your stick (s) and your gloves ...... "Gloves?" ...... Yea, gloves dude. Do you want to smash each other's bare hand...... "I don't have gloves." ..... Don't worry, you can borrow mine.


    He comes over, he borrows my LaCrosse gloves, he has two sticks, I have one. Sure enough, he swings over hand with his stick behind his hand .... my stick, which was held low, which he commented was wrong, swings up and catches his wrist while his stick is facing at about 12 o'clock, straight up .... not even close to a threat. Even with the gloves he drops the stick.

    Turns out, he learned: cut 1, cut 2, cut 3, cut 4, etc, etc., etc And their "live" traing consisted of playing lightsabers with these cuts on each other's stick.

    How good his teacher was, I don't know. But I think there's a big lesson in there. In one week I learned one or two solid principles that I carried with me for two years, never used, but was able to beat someone who was swinging , unknown to himself, mindlessly, for almost that entire time.

    When you have power and structure any form will do. Just like when you have money, you never worry about what you can afford.

    You can sell a fool a million different tools that he'll never use. A skilled craftsman can do a million things with just a few tools.

    Anyway, sorry for so many words. And you inspired me with your weapons. It's something I want to make time for but I'm just not satisfied with my hands yet. Someday I hope.

    Peace
    Ray
    Last edited by Ray Pina; 05-24-2006 at 11:13 AM.

  5. #80
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    well...you probably shouldn't train a weapon to be used against another weapon. The weapon should be trained to attck the flesh that holds teh weapon.

    I mean, yeah, there is the art of parrying, but that is minimal compared to the art of getting in to the meat.

    the closest target is usually the hand of your opponent.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #81
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    i do know two chinese broadsword sets.

    and i can tell you, if i were to fence, i am much more comfortable using what i learned through actual sparring matches with wooden weapons.

    though i have taken what i learned in my sparring and applied what i have learned in form as well.

    once i completed my first dao set, i went again to spar my friends. (using wodden dao) this time i used all i had previously learned through sparring to engage my enemy and defend myself from pressing attacks.

    for this particular sparring match my opponent i knew i already outclassed somewhat. i was able, to more often than not, defeat him in a match. using my previous knowledge birthed in actual action, it was an increadable feeling to apply my new found techniques in combat. those derived from form work.

    it was similar to the feeling of broad expiramentation, that is felt when freefighting and learning through doing. the only difference was that i used my knowledge of fighting through fighting to create openings for my new techniques. what i discovered is that once the opening is created, and utilized, the techniques i had chosen to pull from my set were very successfull. near to the point of overwhelming my opponent. using several forms from the set in sequence, i created a confident barrage, wrought in practice, that my opponent had no idea how to defend against.

    though at the same time, i had to FEEL my way through. even using movements i had practiced a thousand time before. it was still alien to free movement. though once applied and understood in combat, the techniques i had chosen became a powerful tool.

    this is the point i actually understood the necessity to try techniques learned in form to a freemoving environment. to, in a sence, re-establish the comfortability of these movments.

    to first learn a movement and become comfortable with it, will never assure your comfort in using said movement in combat. only combat will do that.

    it is to take the form and then apply it to combat taht makes it effective. for there are many techniques that are transmitted in form alone, that we would othewise not know. given the sequence of forms, you can then choose which ones to take and apply to a combat scenario, to solidify in your actual combat arsenal, and thus removing it from being soley in your library of techniques available for you to train in such a way.

    if any of that blab makes sense...
    A man has only one death. That death may be as weighty as Mt. Tai, or it may be as light as a goose feather. It all depends upon the way he uses it....
    ~Sima Qian

    Master pain, or pain will master you.
    ~PangQuan

    "Just do your practice. Who cares if someone else's practice is not traditional, or even fake? What does that have to do with you?"
    ~Gene "The Crotch Master" Ching

    You know you want to click me!!

  7. #82
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    That makes a lot of sense!

    If I'm hearing you right you used your delivery system to open the hole, and once opened, the forms provided a source of materials to choose from. Then that is great! Truly!

    I know palming someone's chin up and then burrying your fingers into their skull via the eyes and pulling down is not good, I just think many CMAs lack the delivery system to do it. Seems like you have both, the means and the assortment. Bravo.

    PangQuan, if you're ever in NYC you have to stop by, my master loves the sword. He held a sword gathering last year .... no trophies or anything like that, just everybody play with everybody and then go get lunch. I hope he has one this year. I just watched, but it was great.

  8. #83
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    i might have to make a special trip to NYC some time. never been but have always wanted to. not promising it will be any time soon, but i do promise that when i eventually make it to new york, provided you and your master are still there, i will come to visit.

    thanks for the invite

    the sword was my introduction to MA, and it will always hold a special place for me.

    though the skills are often held as antiquity, there is just something about it that feels right.
    A man has only one death. That death may be as weighty as Mt. Tai, or it may be as light as a goose feather. It all depends upon the way he uses it....
    ~Sima Qian

    Master pain, or pain will master you.
    ~PangQuan

    "Just do your practice. Who cares if someone else's practice is not traditional, or even fake? What does that have to do with you?"
    ~Gene "The Crotch Master" Ching

    You know you want to click me!!

  9. #84
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    My post was in defense of traditional combat oriented CMA...not modern wushu.
    A unique snowflake

  10. #85
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    Wushu

    so i guess this thread was somewhat deraile from its topic.

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...07890235174129

    some beautiful eagle claw wushu. he imbodies the spirit of the eagle well.

    the way he sticks his landing at 00:46 is quite impressive.
    Last edited by PangQuan; 05-24-2006 at 12:01 PM.
    A man has only one death. That death may be as weighty as Mt. Tai, or it may be as light as a goose feather. It all depends upon the way he uses it....
    ~Sima Qian

    Master pain, or pain will master you.
    ~PangQuan

    "Just do your practice. Who cares if someone else's practice is not traditional, or even fake? What does that have to do with you?"
    ~Gene "The Crotch Master" Ching

    You know you want to click me!!

  11. #86
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    ttt 4 2017!

    Slightly OT

    Alleged 'WUSHU' graffiti artist arrested in Marietta
    Ryan Dennis, WXIA 12:47 PM. EDT October 11, 2017



    MARIETTA, GA - Police have arrested an alleged graffiti artist for his involvement with numerous tags in the city of Marietta.

    Officers have arrested William Carswell and charged him with 15 felonies related to criminal trespass.

    Detectives began their investigation back in September when officers received a report about vandalism at 1476 Roswell Road.

    During the initial investigation of the incident it was discovered that “WUSHU” was carved into the window of Beats Barber Shop. Responding officers canvased the area speaking with residents and business owners in search of a witness.

    Eventually, the officers developed a description of an individual that had used spray paint on an ice machine near 1462 Roswell Road. The officers found numerous tags on Roswell Road including in Cobb County’s jurisdiction which officials say are identical to those in Marietta.

    PHOTOS : Alleged “WUSHU” graffiti artist arrested in Marietta


    This investigation sparked a deeper look at the acts of vandalism in the Cobb County area, linking together footage of several locations being tagged by a man that fit Carswell’s description.

    Police said Caswell has two prior arrests, each with similar charges of interference with government property, criminal trespass and criminal damage to property.

    The Marietta Police Department has contacted neighboring agencies in reference to similar acts of vandalism in their jurisdictions that may also be linked to Carswell.

    The current investigations into the tagging problem in the area is ongoing.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  12. #87
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    Jane Wu

    Didn't quite know where to post this as Wu has worked on a number of films we've discussed so I'm going with the upcoming Mulan one and the Wushu one.

    AUGUST 29, 2019 9:45AM PT
    Production Artist Jane Wu Smashes Glass Ceiling With Her Work on Action Movies
    By S.D. KATZ


    CREDIT: COURTESY OF WARNER BROS.

    “If no one is dying, nothing is exploding and no one is trying to kill each other, you shouldn’t be calling me,” says Jane Wu, a storyboard artist with credits including “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” “Thor: Ragnarok” and Disney’s upcoming live-action remake of “Mulan.”

    Wu is one of the few women who work in this segment of the business, where artists sketch out the action sequences that the rest of a movie’s crew will spend months realizing for the big screen.

    Wu says she used the more generic name J. Wu in the early part of her career. With her talents now in high demand, she doesn’t need the abbreviation. “By the time I got a shot at ‘The Avengers,’ they already knew my name,” she says. “[Director] Joss [Whedon] was looking for more action people and asked, ‘Who is this person that I keep hearing about?’ That got him curious enough to bring me in, and I got the gig.”

    A graduate of Otis College of Art and Design, Wu started her career by opening a comic book shop in the 1990s and drawing comics in her spare time. She was a student of the traditional Chinese martial art wushu, and that knowledge helped her draw technically correct poses when choreographing fight scenes.

    Her first break was being hired as a character designer for the late-1990s animated TV series “Men in Black.” Wu says she preferred story and sequential art, and her skeptical director agreed to give her a shot at storyboarding.

    “I failed miserably,” Wu says. “I didn’t understand scene construction.” She was advised to watch old black-and-white movies with the sound off; things began to click after a few months.

    She began storyboarding on Season 2 of “Men in Black,” as well as producing and directing a couple of episodes. She moved on to storyboarding the animated “Godzilla: The Series,” the “Tinker Bell” video series and the Disney sequel “Mulan 2.”

    She broke into live-action storyboarding with an uncredited turn on “The A-Team” and followed it up with “Captain America: The First Avenger” and “Percy Jackson: Sea of Monsters.” But the move brought new challenges.

    “I was the only woman in the story pit,” she says. “No women directors, no women story artists. I knew I needed to be one of the boys, so I would play basketball at lunch with everyone and talk nerd stuff to fit in, and with my tomboy upbringing, I was shortly in the club and accepted by the pack.”

    Working in New York on the “Sopranos” prequel, Wu faced another challenge to her action skill set. “I wanted to Dutch [tilt] one of the shots to heighten the action, but I was told ‘The Sopranos’ is about realism not fantasy.”

    Her next gig opens another new door: serving as a producer alongside director Alan Taylor on “Gold Mountain,” about the 1850s San Francisco gold rush.

    Ultimately, Wu didn’t wind up using a flying kick to break down barriers in the industry; her storyboard sketches did.
    I spoke at Otis College of Art and Design on a panel for Shaolin: Temple of Zen: Photographs by Justin Guariglia. It produces some amazing artists.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #88
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    Wushu

    Iran’s “Zero to Platform” nominated for Discovery Award at Raindance Film Festival
    Culture
    September 16, 2019



    TEHRAN – “Zero to Platform”, a documentary by Sahar Mosayyebi, chronicling the life of three Iranian wushu athlete sisters, has been nominated for the Discovery Award at the 27th Raindance Film Festival in London, the organizers have announced.

    The documentary recounts the concerted efforts of the Mansurian sisters, Elaheh, Shahrbanu and Soheila, who chose wushu martial art to achieve success in life despite all the hardship they have faced throughout their life.

    The film registered as “Platform” in the festival’s schedule will be competing with five other films, including “A Dobugawa Dream” from Japan, “Miguelito” from Australia and “Oray” from Germany.

    As a large independent film event in the UK, the Raindance Film Festival will be running from September 18 to 29.

    The festival is officially recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, the British Academy of Film and Television Arts and the British Independent Film Awards. Selected shorts will qualify for Oscars and BAFTA considerations.

    Photo: A scene from “Zero to Platform” by Sahar Mosayyebi.

    RM/MMS/YAW


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  14. #89
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    Wushu & Sambo added to the World Games


    THE WORLD GAMES FAMILY GROWS
    The World Games family welcomes two new members. During the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the International World Games Association (IWGA), the representatives of the 36 participating member federations approved the applications of the International Wushu Federation and International Sambo Federation. A two-thirds majority was required.

    The AGM was again held remotely due to the restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The meeting was attended by 36 of the 37 IWGA member federations.

    IWGA President José Perurena, who chaired this year’s AGM, congratulated President Gou Zhongwen of the International Wushu Federation and President Vasily Shestakov of the International Sambo Federation on the admission of their federations as the 38th and 39th members of The World Games family. The federations already have IWGA history: Sambo was part of the official programme in London (GBR) at The World Games 1985 and in The Hague (Netherlands) in 1993. Wushu was represented at The World Games as an invitational sport in 2009 in Kaohsiung (Chinese Taipei) and in Cali (Colombia) in 2013. In 2022 in Birmingham, Alabama, Wushu will again participate in the programme.

    The last new admission of a federation took place in 2014, when the World Association of Kickboxing Organizations successfully applied for admission to the IWGA.

    The AGM decided to extend the term of office of the IWGA Board by one year to 2023, due to the postponement of the eleventh edition of the World Games in Birmingham, Alabama to the coming year. Extending the term of office by one year will enable the existing board to complete the preparations for The World Games 2022 in the USA.

    Max Bishop, Vice-President of the IWGA, describes why the motion of prolongation was on the agenda:

    "Leaving office just before the Games - and before the evaluation phase has even started - is obviously not ideal. We therefore invited the membership to extend the current ExCo's term of office, given the exceptional circumstances.”

    With almost 14 months to go before the opening of the multisport-event at the newly built Protective Stadium in Birmingham Alabama, Nick Sellers, CEO of the local Birmingham Organizing Committee presented the current state of preparations for The World Games 2022 (7-17 July 2022). All 25 competition venues have now been decided upon for the ten competition days, when 34 sports will be showcased and more than 200 medal events held. In addition, Nick Sellers announced that the launch of ticket sales will be on 7th July 2021, exactly one year before the Games. Sellers assured the meeting that Birmingham is ready and very much looking forward to hosting The World Games 2022. He stated that The World Games most likely would be the first major international sports event in the USA, and possibly in the whole world, to be held with full stands again.

    “It will be a great re-connection of humanity,” Sellers said.

    President Perurena concluded the meeting: “Thank you all for attending, and for your understanding of the difficult circumstances that made a physical meeting impossible. Thank you also for your support of the Executive Committee.

    I sincerely hope that we will all be together somewhere for next year’s AGM, just a couple of months before we all go to Birmingham for The World Games 2022. In the meantime, I look forward to seeing some of you in Birmingham this November, when we hold a series of planning meetings with the Birmingham Organising Committee.

    Usually, I wish you a safe journey home. Today, I just say “Stay safe… wherever you are! Goodbye.”


    The World Games is a multi-sport event staged every four years by the International World Games Association under the patronage of the International Olympic Committee. The 11th edition of The World Games will be held in Birmingham, Alabama, USA, 7-17 July 2022. 3,600 athletes from over 30 sports and 100 countries will take part in The World Games.
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