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Thread: A martial artist's journey through college...

  1. #16
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    i did the partying thing for like 6 months of my college years, the rest washomework and kung fu. meeting girls?.... life isnt about girls man. life is about them mmaking you food and cleaning up after you
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mantis View Post
    Genes too busy rocking the gang and scarfing down bags of cheetos while beating it to nacho ninjettes and laughing at the ridiculous posts on the kfforum. In a horse stance of course.

  2. #17
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    Ah, so you did a lot of weed.
    Whao! Attaway to sound like a cop.


    I'm about to begin my journey through college. I will be attending Insititue of Prodcution and Recording in Minnasota this fall. I'll be recieving a A.A.S. in Music Production and Engineering along with a minor in Music Business. I will also be certified in Pro Tools. I'm excited about the school, especially since its a music school and two of my friends are also planning to go there. If things don't go my way after I've recieved my degree, I plan to attend Berkely Academy of Music in Boston to turn my A.A.S. into a PhD. Hopefully, IPR will help my production skills enough so I don't have another 4-6 years in school after I recieve my degree.

    I'll probably have a grip of stories to tell you seeing how Texans love to party and I'm college age. I'll carry on the tradition of Texans throwing the best parties in Minnesota and being around scores of women.

    ****! I can't wait!
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  3. #18
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    life isnt about girls man. life is about them mmaking you food and cleaning up after you
    the correct has sat on the couch... playing playstation and is watchin a chick in a thong make spagetti.......
    "pain is not my enemy; it is my call to greatness. " - Henry Rollins


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  4. #19
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    A college degree will ultimately be much more valuable to you than drinking stories. The average college graduate earns $100,000 more in his lifetime than a non-graduate. Doesn't sound like a lot, but in the long run, it could be the difference between living paycheck-to-paycheck until you get social security and being able to afford a 2 week vacation every year with the woman and retiring on time.
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

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  5. #20
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    Originally posted by Suntzu
    the correct has sat on the couch... playing playstation and is watchin a chick in a thong make spagetti.......
    that... is... beautiful...

    I mean.... like chauvinistic and oppressive.. and stuff... hey, why are a whole bunch of heavily armed women knocking on my door with shirts that say "now?" "now" what?

    "Hey chicks!" *ZZZaaappp...*
    "Prepare your mind..." "For a mind explosion!"
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  6. #21
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    There is always time for studies AND women...always....ALWAYS. And when I have the time and money (which won't be that often) I will throw parties...Its who I am. I'll still get my studies done.

    Yes, the money is a great perk to college, but so are the friendships you make.
    Last edited by CaptinPickAxe; 05-17-2004 at 02:42 PM.
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  7. #22
    I've been on both sides of the fence. I went off to college and partied and took lots of drugs and got kicked out of college actually. When I hit the lowest low I got into martial arts and it completely changed my life. I had to choose, party lifestyle or kung fu lifestyle and the kung fu lifestyle "mostly" won out.

    I think the key is balance. I know that is cliched but it's so true. You can go too far in any direction at the expense of the rest of your life and it will make you unhappy.

    I don't know if this would help you but I have my own little way that I try to keep my life in balance. It's a distillation of many years of trial and error and reading lots of self help books etc.

    Basically I try to set long and short term goals as well as behaviors/habits in the most important areas of life. I try to work toward self-improvement.

    I break it down like this:

    Spirit-Your spiritual and philosophical grounding. This infects everything that you do and everything that you are.

    Then you have 4 mental capacitites that you work toward:

    Warrior
    Scholar
    Healer
    Artist

    Martial arts is amazing in that it encompasses many of these mindsets and if you are involved in Martial arts in a spiritual way it also takes care of the spiritual aspect. However, developing these capacities outside of martial arts training can help your martial arts training. Think of the sword master who also is a master of Chinese calligraphy.

    Finally, the 4 temporal/material attainments. What everyone is striving towards and yet comes and goes w/ time.

    Health
    Wealth
    Career
    Relationships


    Based on my "model" it sounds like you have been working toward developing yourself as a Warrior and Artist through martial arts. As well as a Scholar through college. And pursuing good Health as well as a Career and Wealth in the future. All worthy pursuits. But it sounds as though you have not specifically setting aside the time to develop Relationships (specifically w/ women) as well as perhaps reaching out to your community as a Healer (which would provide you with more opportunities to meet women, ie you don't find many women developing their Warrior mindset thru martial arts ).

    I don't have all that answers....but that's just my 4 cents...

    Good luck to you.

  8. #23
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    Luckly, I've already gone through my drug phase. Martial Arts got me out of that. I still drink (not much anymore) and smoke (occasionally). I've already go the mindset to go in there and learn how to make music better.

    Thanks for the info, Fu-Pow. I'm humble enough to take advice from someone who has been there.
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  9. #24
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    alkyhol is good
    those who disagree can have their girlfriends suck my ****
    then we'll have no problem
    "If you're havin girl problems i feel bad for you son
    I got 99 problems but a bitch ain't one"

    "If you can't respect that your whole perspective is wack
    Maybe you'll love me when i fade to black"


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  10. #25
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    oh yeah and school sux, always
    dont matter if highschool, colege or what
    it sux

    and your girlfriend can suck my **** again if you disagree
    "If you're havin girl problems i feel bad for you son
    I got 99 problems but a bitch ain't one"

    "If you can't respect that your whole perspective is wack
    Maybe you'll love me when i fade to black"


    http://www.hotornot.com/r/?eid=OQSURMO&key=FMA
    __________________

  11. #26
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    Stanford bars all martial arts clubs

    I studied a lot of martial arts at University. This makes me really sad, but I have always wondered about liability issues for such clubs.

    Jin Hyun·July 23, 2019·24 min read
    Stanford University Reportedly Bans All Martial Arts Groups Without Warning Over Email


    Stanford University is being accused of shutting down all martial arts groups on campus without warning.

    Stanford alumni Matthew Choi took to the Facebook group Subtle Asian Traits to explain the situation and list the supposed reasons behind why all Stanford martial arts groups were “unceremoniously dumped and shut down over email.”

    According to Choi, the university’s justification behind the shutdown can be summarized in four points: “the groups like to unofficially practice during dead week, they recruit professional, internationally renowned coaches to run their practices, they compete and regularly win national championships without University help, they participate heavily in the local community by teaching students, alumni, and community members.”


    Image via Facebook / @StanfordWushu

    The former student has explained that while the Stanford Martial Arts Programs have been running successfully for two decades, regularly communicating with administrators with no previous issues, the University has now decided that the groups’ interactions with community members outside of the university was unacceptable.

    “The groups allow community members and alumni in practices,” Choi wrote. “The University is taking such a hard line on this point that groups cannot even bring in outside coaches to teach anymore, let alone allow alumni and community members to participate/teach at practices. Students are now expected to teach all these practices.”

    Previously the programs would hire professional coaches to train classes, many of these coaches are world renowned athletes, such as an Olympic-level archery coach and former international wushu champion and teammate of Jet Li.



    These instructors would help host regular self-defense seminars for students and the surrounding communities, while allowing alumni, staff, and other locals to take part in classes they otherwise would not have access to.

    “These are things the clubs have been doing for a couple of decades, and which Stanford has been aware of and allowed for the same amount of time,” Choi explained. “The clubs have worked with the same administrator, Nanci, for that time, she’s been familiar with the practice, and has never mentioned any of this as a serious issue.”

    These activities used to be a positive community building experience for all those involved, and a way of connecting students, alumni, staff members, and locals together. However, the new restriction imposed by the university has affected more than just the martial arts programs, it is reportedly disadvantaging many other groups with heavy Asian American involvement.


    Image via Facebook / @StanfordTaekwondo

    “What makes it even worse for me, lots of groups that happen to have heavy Asian American membership have also been affected. They weren’t shut down, but they were banned from having community members,” Choi states.

    “Just like Stanford martial arts groups, groups like Stanford Archery and many dance groups like Ballroom Dance gave and learned a lot from the local community. It’s also been key for helping them raise funds for their coaches and travel to national tournaments. Many of the groups, even if they were to fully comply next year, would either be severely crippled or unable to continue.”

    While it could be argued that the policy itself is neutral, Choi explains the end result of the university’s action is undeniable, “[the policy] still hurts groups that are mostly Asian in membership. That’s not good whether it’s on purpose or not.”

    There is also a rather clear double standard in this supposed liability assessment which has not yet been addressed by the University.



    According to the alumni, non-students are allowed to access Stanford Gyms with students, completely unsupervised. “That’s a risk the university is perfectly happy with right now. This is the same with most other universities,” he wrote.

    “On the other hand for our activities, groups are supervised and taught by professional coaches, many of them internationally renowned. Everyone joining in is known, and kept track of. If anything, the risk level is lower.”

    However, the new policy demands that these martial arts groups ban community members such as university alumni as well as the professional coaches. This presents safety concerns for the members, “So now, you’ve created even more liability, because you have untrained students attempting to teach themselves martial arts from the Internet,” Choi says.



    The Stanford University Wushu team is a several-time national collegiate champion. Similarly, other martial arts groups such as Taekwondo, Karate, Kenpo, Judo, and Jujitsu, are prestigious teams home to champions.

    The absence of professional trainers, however, would hurt the success of these programs while also disadvantaging the communities outside of Stanford who also enjoyed these experiences. If this policy continues, students fear they will be kept in an isolated bubble, unable to properly train or communicate with others practicing the craft outside of their campus.

    NextShark has reached out to Howard Wolf, Vice President of Alumni Affairs at Stanford, and Susie Brubaker-Cole, Vice Provost for Student Affairs at Stanford, but have yet to receive a reply.
    continued next post
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  12. #27
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    Continued from previous post


    Choi’s full text post can be viewed below:

    Martial Arts Banned at Stanford
    TLDR
    Hey SAT family, sorry have a serious one for you. So if you know me at all you know I’m a big wushu and martial arts fan and started at Stanford (I’m an alum now).<
    However, the craziest thing happen recently. Stanford shut down all martial arts groups on campus without any warning.

    DETAILS
    The issue? Not because of some crazy scandals like our actual sports teams (hi Turner and Vandemoer). But because all the groups work too hard at being exceptional at what they do.
    The groups

    like to unofficially practice during dead week
    they recruit professional, internationally renowned coaches to run their practices
    they compete and regularly win national championships without University help
    they participate heavily in the local community by teaching students, alumni, and community members.
    The University doesn’t like any of those things, and really strangely, it especially doesn’t like the fact that students get to interact with community members. This is despite the Stanford Martial Arts Program having done this successfully for two decades, and having regularly communicated its programs with the same administrator for the same two decades. The groups were unceremoniously dumped and shut down over email.

    What is the Actual Ban
    A lot of people have commented asking for supporting/links original emails. Thank you for the healthy skepticism, and keeping me honest. Most of the group’s haven’t posted about it, and are keeping quiet, here the few that have:

    Stanford Archery’s page:
    https://archery.stanford.edu/programs.html

    Stanford Wushu’s page:
    https://www.facebook.com/stanfordWushu/

    Stanford Akido’s page: http://aikido.stanford.edu/suspended

    The text of the martial arts suspension is on Akido’s page. Almost all of the bullet points raised in the email are completely untrue and I don’t want to spend time on them (finances are preapproved and audited by the student government, of course the clubs are run by student leaders, of course they meet with ASSU, SAL, and student government regularly, etc).

    The only true point, is that the groups allow community members and alumni in practices. The University is taking such a hard line on this point that groups cannot even bring in outside coaches to teach anymore, let alone allow alumni and community members to participate/teach at practices. Students are now expected to teach all these practices.

    These are things the clubs have been doing for a couple of decades, and which Stanford has been aware of and allowed for the same amount of time. The clubs have worked with the same administrator, Nanci, for that time, she’s been familiar with the practice, and has never mentioned any of this as a serious issue.
    In the martial arts programs, all the groups hire professional coaches and set up dedicated/full training classes. We also regularly host self-defense seminars for campus and the community.
    These are students holding and running classes with professional coaches for themselves and the local community. Clubs give back to the community by allowing alumni, staff, and locals to take part in classes they normally wouldn’t have access to. Many of the coaches are world class (Olympic-level archery coach, former international wushu champion and teammate of Jet Li for wushu, etc).
    This is something we do to connect the experience of students and community together and is a positive experience for everyone involved. The community and students end up being an extended family that shares in their unique discipline. This the type of community building and partnership that colleges like Stanford regularly talk about building.

    Why This Can Be an Asian & Asian American Issue
    Feel free to skip this section if you don’t believe in these type of things, I think there’s still a strong argument without it.
    What makes it even worse for me, lots of groups that happen to have heavy Asian American membership have also been affected. They weren’t shut down, but they were banned from having community members.
    Just like Stanford martial arts groups, groups like Stanford Archery and many dance groups like Ballroom Dance gave and learned a lot from the local community. It’s also been key for helping them raise funds for their coaches and travel to national tournaments. Many of the groups, even if they were to fully comply next year, would either be severely crippled or unable to continue.
    The policy itself seems neutral, so you’re probably thinking this isn’t racist, it’s just the University locking down rules. Of course it’s not targeted (at least hopefully), but the end result is undeniable, you’re still hurts groups that are mostly Asian in membership. That’s not good whether it’s on purpose or not.

    The same happens when you tax soda. You think you’re preventing people from drinking unhealthy drinks, which is true, but as a side effect, you also end up taxing the poor. This turns out to be because the poor are more likely to stay with their vices
    https://taxfoundation.org/soda-taxes-regressive/

    In this case, I believe this is happening due to a confluence of culture, and admissions selection criteria.

    Asians, are more likely to run their groups as extended families that connect with the local community. In the East, you are much more likely to define yourself through the relationships and social connections to yourself. Even for Asian Americans, born in the US, this is something that is probably passing through their cultural upbringing.

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2017...different-ways

    But that’s just one aspect of it. Admissions at higher education for Asians Americans is extraordinarily tough. It’s been shown that admitted students have higher academic marks and extracurricular activities than their peers due to affirmative action
    https://www.insidehighered.com/admis...missions-elite.

    I don’t want to rabbithole on that debate, but the upshot, is through admission pressure the Asian students you’re bringing in at top universities are going to be superstars in extracurriculars.
    So as a result, they’re not going to limit themselves to normal student activities of just hanging out in simple hobbyist club (nothing wrong with that, but that’s not who they are). They’re always going to do the extreme, because that’s who you selected for during admissions. In the case of martial arts enthusiasts, they’re going to bring in professional coaches, they’re going to practice during dead week, and they’re going to involve the community to learn more and bring in more students. In the case of archery, this manifested as them running $100k/year archery programs via teaching community programs to kids. They’re always going to bring it to the next level. That’s how they got in, and that’s who they are.

    Ok Sure, But It’s Just a Liability Assessment, and You’re a Liability
    Non-students are allowed to use Stanford Gyms. For example, almuni can checkin, and then go to play whatever sport they want. They come in and play pick-up basketball with students today, completely unsupervised. That’s a risk the university is perfectly happy with right now. This is the same with most other universities.

    On the other hand for our activities, groups are supervised and taught by professional coaches, many of them internationally renowned. Everyone joining in is known, and kept track of. If anything, the risk level is lower.

    The university is actually asking that martial arts groups not only ban community members like alumni, but also remove their professional coaches. So now, you’ve created even more liability, because you have untrained students attempting to teach themselves martial arts from the Internet.
    Even if no one get seriously injured form this, it’s no question, that not being able to bring in actual coaches would hurt the success of all these programs. Speaking for Wushu alone, it has been a several time national collegiate champion, and has been home to several all-around champions. TKD, Karate, Kenpo, Judo, Jujisitu, and all the other martial arts groups are just as storied.
    Now think of the benefits of community participation. The combined programs of SMAP, archery, and many others, have taught and mentored tons of kids and adults in the local community. Even in this post tons of people are speaking up about their experience with the various martial arts groups, and archery. From wushu alone, we’ve trained and mentored kids who eventually enrolled at Stanford. This is the type thing you really want to be doing as a university, instead of keeping students in an isolated bubble (a common Stanford criticism).
    If you agree with these principles, then help us convince the university that it’s actually similar or lower risk than what’s allowed today, that the things we’re doing are good for the students and the community, and that it’s not a good idea to run martial arts practices without qualified professional instruction.

    How to Help
    It would be great if you guys could help spread the word about this. Please complain to the following people at Stanford:

    CONTACTS:
    Howard Wolf, Vice President of Alumni Affairs
    howardwolf@stanford.edu, https://twitter.com/hkrtwolf
    Susie Brubaker-Cole, Vice Provost for Student Affairs
    Susiebc@stanford.edu, https://twitter.com/brubakersusie

    PS: Here’s a trailer of Stanford Wushu cause we’re a cool group and we’re banned. And banned things are even cooler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_8jpp5b_wpw

    Featured image via YouTube / @bluehippofilms
    The ripple effect this might have upon collegiate martial arts programs across the nation is staggering...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  13. #28
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    Ban lifted

    Stanford ends ban on martial arts clubs, but tightens rules
    September 3, 2019 7:30 am


    Stanford Taekwondo, image via Facebook / @StanfordTaekwondo

    BY SARA TABIN
    Daily Post Staff Writer

    Stanford will allow most of its martial arts clubs to return to campus this fall, as long as the groups comply with tighter university regulations.

    Over the summer Stanford suspended 13 martial arts groups, including its Wushu, Taekwondo and Aikido groups, and its archery club after a spring audit found that the student groups were not in line with university policies.

    Alumnus and Wushu artist Matthew Choi took to Facebook to condemn the ban. He accused Stanford of shutting the clubs down for being too hardworking.

    “The groups like to unofficially practice during dead week, they recruit professional, internationally renowned coaches to run their practices, they compete and regularly win national championships without University help, and they participate heavily in the local community by teaching students, alumni and community members,” Choi wrote. “The university doesn’t like any of those things, and really strangely, it especially doesn’t like the fact that students get to interact with community members.”

    Stanford Wushu posted on its Facebook page asking people to send letters in support of the groups to Stanford administrators. In a statement posted on Wednesday, Stanford said they received over 150 letters of support for the organizations.

    Most of the groups will be allowed back in the fall as long as they comply with regulations including a minimum of ten active members and at least three student leaders, and a summary of costs to prove that expenses for the group are benefiting Stanford students. The letter says that the mix of students and non-students engaging in activities introduced “complexities” for which the university had not planned.

    Stanford plans to launch a working group to study and recommend policies for student organizations.

    Martial arts groups contacted by the Post did not respond to requests for comment Friday. Stanford Wushu posted on Facebook Wednesday that the club leaders are working with other groups to craft a response to Stanford’s announcement.
    Glad to hear this is sorted. I was beginning to wonder if it was connected to the Confucius Institute ban, but it seems to be entirely unrelated.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #29
    In Taiwan, from primary, high school to college, there are kungfu clubs.
    There are also tkd, judo and karate clubs.

    Tkd clubs are way more popular.

    Because, there are games all the way to Olympics.


  15. #30
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    a little more follow up

    New rules exclude community members from Stanford clubs
    October 2, 2019 8:30 am


    Stanford shut down its martial arts clubs over the summer in a dispute over participation by non-students and other issues. Photo courtesy of the Stanford Martial Arts Program, a collective of student groups.

    BY SARA TABIN
    Daily Post Staff Writer

    Stanford is devastating campus clubs through a crackdown on non-student club members, according to a dozen students and alumni who spoke about their concerns with the Daily Post.

    Stanford in June suspended student clubs deemed out of compliance with university policy, including its 13 martial arts groups, dance groups and the archery team.

    In August, the university said most of the groups could return if they comply with tighter regulations. But students say the rules, including a ban on non-student participants, will ruin the communities they have worked hard to create.

    Jessica Luo, co-president of Stanford Wushu, which practices a form of Chinese Kung Fu which involves aerobics and swords as well as hand-to-hand combat, said the group includes Stanford alumni and employees as well as local Wushu enthusiasts.

    Since Wushu is a sport that takes years to master, the students in the club have the advantage of learning from more experienced members.

    Jim Shen, a UC-San Diego alumnus who participated in Stanford Wushu over the past four years while working at Stanford’s Center for Educational Policy Analysis, also noted the benefits that students receive when skilled Wushu artists practice with them. He said USA Wushu Team member Brian Wang has attended Stanford Wushu practices on an irregular basis over the past few years.

    “If Seth Curry wanted to come practice with the intramural basketball team, I don’t think the school would say no that’s not beneficial,” he said.

    Shen said UCSD’s Wushu team similarly benefited from the presence of non-student members and outside coaches.

    Mental health benefits

    Luo, who joined Wushu the spring semester of her freshman year, said there are mental health benefits to interacting with people not caught up in the rush of Stanford.

    “The pressure to compete with other people and master something quickly and be excellent at it, a lot of people get into Stanford because of their ability to do that but suffer from living their lives under that pressure,” explained Luo. “Having a practice that exists on a different time scale helps.”

    She said the community members have contributed to the club in material ways, including renting cars to drive students down to last year’s Collegiate Wushu Tournament at UC-Irvine.

    Non-student members also pay dues that are higher than students pay. Shen said if Stanford is concerned that money is being diverted from students, they should increase dues for non-students instead of banning them.

    Luo expressed concern over whether the Stanford Wushu team will be allowed to compete nationally or even retain the outside coaches they have hired since they do not have designation as an official athletic club. Last year they took second at nationals.

    Stanford’s response

    Brad Hayward, associate vice president for university communications, responded to questions from the Post with links to the university’s press release on martial arts clubs. The release says that the mix of students and non-students engaging in activities introduced “complexities” for which the university had not planned. Hayward also said Stanford is providing all impacted clubs, including non-martial arts groups, with a list of adjustments and materials to prepare for review so they can return in the fall.

    Matthew Choi, a Stanford alumnus and Wushu artist who helped spearhead a letter writing campaign to bring back the banned clubs, said he thinks the university is likely worried about liability for non-students.
    Clubs meet in Stanford facilities, typically at no cost.

    Stanford has created a student organization working group to examine appropriate levels of non-student involvement in clubs and to determine what sort of oversight is needed for student clubs. The committee is supposed to submit a final report to Vice Provost Susie Brubaker-Cole by December.

    Brett Salazar, president of the Stanford Martial Arts Program and a Brazilian Jiu Jitsu martial artist, said he has been working closely with the administration and has a lot of faith in the working group. He said he believes the university understands the complexities of the clubs’ needs. But Salazar said it was unfair of the university to suddenly spring the suspension on students.

    Stanford didn’t reach out to student leaders before announcing the summer suspension and have yet to answer all of his questions about rules for the fall semester, he said.

    Salazar is not the only one who expressed confusion about the process Stanford is taking.

    Aerobics and yoga, too

    Nicole Xu, president of Stanford Aerobics and Yoga or SAY, said that she met with administration in February shortly after she became president. At the time she was told that at least 50% of class attendees had to be students and club officers could not be paid but student teachers could. In June the administration informed her that class attendees all had to be students and no one could be paid.

    SAY has garnered more than 800 signatures on a petition asking the administration to reverse those positions. Many signees have commented that SAY’s classes are more affordable than outside studios and important to their mental health.

    Francis Parchaso, Stanford’s head archery coach, said the group will not be able to hold its weekend junior archery practice during the fall semester.

    Weekend lessons given by the team members to local kids have been a source of revenue for the club for nearly 20 years and in the past have generated so much money that archery donated some to other clubs. The fundraising activity also gave Stanford students a chance to learn about running a business, he said.

    “It seemed to be a win-win for everybody except we have been told it’s against the rules,” he said.
    Interesting that the Wushu people are the most outspoken on this, but maybe that's just my bias because of how I scan newsfeeds.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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