View Poll Results: What to do about the 'Is Shaolin-Do for real?' thread

Voters
57. You may not vote on this poll
  • Unlock IS-Dfr. Merge all S-D threads together so it clears 1000 posts!

    22 38.60%
  • Unlock IS-Dfr. Let all the S-D threads stand independently.

    13 22.81%
  • Keep IS-Dfr locked down. All IS-Dfr posters deserved to be punished.

    5 8.77%
  • Delete them all. Let Yama sort them out.

    17 29.82%
Page 1327 of 1334 FirstFirst ... 32782712271277131713251326132713281329 ... LastLast
Results 19,891 to 19,905 of 20000

Thread: Is Shaolin-Do for real?

  1. #19891
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    374
    Congratulations
    I find we usually get more out of doing something than talking about it
    "The perfect way to do, is to be" ~ Lao Tzu

  2. #19892
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    10,532
    Blog Entries
    6
    congrats.......
    I'm pretty sure the only thing tongs do nowadays is make sure Chinese restaurants don't pay out tips to their waiters. - Pazman[/B]

    https://scontent-b-pao.xx.fbcdn.net/...8a&oe=52848D36

  3. #19893
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Southeast (Kentucky)
    Posts
    172
    Congratulations to both of you!

  4. #19894
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Permanent state of Denial
    Posts
    2,273
    Quote Originally Posted by nautavac View Post
    My daughter and I finally passed first black and jumped right into black tiger. I know many may not think too highly of this post but to us it marks a little achievement in several years spent training and we are thrilled to be a part of it.
    I'd say this. You don't have to be ashamed of what you do. An you don't have to duck your head at your accomplishments. You also don't have to misrepresent the source either. There's freedom in that. The poster above--Jared--noted the change in the Marietta school. The teacher branched out, learned from new teachers in other arts, regularly has some amazing fma, ima, and East Asian ma's run through his school; he scrapped what was bad, and kept what he saw as valuable. I wish I could still be part of that school, but life and such.....

    Some great
    Things I learned: cmc's taichi, which I practice every break and lunch at work (3x day)--granted, "modified" back to the source, but keeping sd's kick for
    The hanging of the lotus. Jiang bagua. Seven star. 14&15 crane ( prob made up by gmst), etc. sin the may have made up a lot of stuff. Some of it was actually quite good. Some was horrible. He knew fighting. His forms, however, we're sometimes bad. Some weren't.

    Always liked black tigers, myself. Still practice them on weekends. Another decent sin the system
    No, no, no. You're not thinking. You're just being logical---Niels Bohr

    Oh yeah!??!! Well, my dad could beat up your dad!--Lineage-Haters

    For all nonsense there is an equal and opposite nonsense---Wook

    My Youtube Channel

  5. #19895
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    kentucky
    Posts
    349
    hello everyone and anyone... haven't been on in a long time. Nice to read back and see all are doing well.
    ...or is there something i have missed a glimpse of phantoms in the mist. Traveling down a dusty road bent forward with this heavy load..

  6. #19896
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    375
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaolin Wookie View Post
    I'd say this. You don't have to be ashamed of what you do. An you don't have to duck your head at your accomplishments. You also don't have to misrepresent the source either. There's freedom in that. The poster above--Jared--noted the change in the Marietta school. The teacher branched out, learned from new teachers in other arts, regularly has some amazing fma, ima, and East Asian ma's run through his school; he scrapped what was bad, and kept what he saw as valuable. I wish I could still be part of that school, but life and such.....

    Some great
    Things I learned: cmc's taichi, which I practice every break and lunch at work (3x day)--granted, "modified" back to the source, but keeping sd's kick for
    The hanging of the lotus. Jiang bagua. Seven star. 14&15 crane ( prob made up by gmst), etc. sin the may have made up a lot of stuff. Some of it was actually quite good. Some was horrible. He knew fighting. His forms, however, we're sometimes bad. Some weren't.

    Always liked black tigers, myself. Still practice them on weekends. Another decent sin the system
    Sounds very similar to my outlook. My focus is on taichi64, Jiang's bagua, I chin ching, black tigers, mantis.
    The black tigers are full of useful techniques. Very practical. I still hit the other stuff between white and black from time to time. Just to keep them in my mind.

  7. #19897
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    America
    Posts
    1,860

    wow

    Glad to see all are well and still fighting . Any new news out there?
    A Fool is Born every Day !

  8. #19898
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    375
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by kwaichang View Post
    Glad to see all are well and still fighting . Any new news out there?
    Check your pm

  9. #19899
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Knoxville Tennessee
    Posts
    5,520
    Just checking in. Things seem to have slowed down. Any news out there? Frank, are you all mended up? KC, hadn't seen you in a while; want to grab a beer?
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    AND, yea, a good bit of it is about whether you can fight with what you know...kinda all of it is about that.

  10. #19900
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Southeast (Kentucky)
    Posts
    172
    Are we still breathing?

  11. #19901
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    America
    Posts
    1,860

    Beer

    No Beer thanks but I would love to have a Tea or Coffee. JP
    A Fool is Born every Day !

  12. #19902
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Southeast (Kentucky)
    Posts
    172
    Come on up to Louisville and you can have both.

  13. #19903
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    kentucky
    Posts
    349
    I it is amazing, how so much as just stopped. Hope all are training well and health.
    ...or is there something i have missed a glimpse of phantoms in the mist. Traveling down a dusty road bent forward with this heavy load..

  14. #19904
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX, USA
    Posts
    272
    Quote Originally Posted by Shaolin Wookie View Post
    Some great
    Things I learned: cmc's taichi, which I practice every break and lunch at work (3x day)--granted, "modified" back to the source, but keeping sd's kick for
    The hanging of the lotus. Jiang bagua. Seven star.
    Nice. I think modifying the forms of the styles you like back to their authentic source is a good way to make the best of the Shaolin Do experience.

    I think quite a few people have done that by moving on to good teachers in Bagua, Taiji, or whatever after an initial exposure to those styles in SD.
    Also, there is so much good stuff online these days, you can start at YouTube.

  15. #19905
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,746

    50 years

    Congratulations to all you Shaolin-Do-ers on this forum.

    Martial arts leader celebrates 50 years of teaching in Lexington
    By Jack Brammer jbrammer@herald-leader.com September 26, 2015


    Grandmaster Sin Thé struck a pose Saturday at a tournament at Lexington Catholic High School. Hundreds of all ages attended from all over the United States. HERALD-LEADER

    As a young man, martial arts Grandmaster Sin Kwang Thé said he could break eight to 10 concrete blocks piled atop one another with one swoop of his hand.

    Today, at age 72, he says he can break only six.

    Time takes its toll, but Thé (pronounced Tay) still is fit and trim.

    At 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighing 149 pounds, he exercises two hours a day and meditates whenever the opportunity arises. He stopped eating meat three years ago when he ballooned to 187 pounds and now uses supplements in his vegetarian diet.

    His knees were bothering him a few years ago, but that problem has gone away. He still can place his foot on a standing man's throat.

    If God permits, he says with a smile, he would like to live another 50 years.

    The soft-spoken Thé, who lives in California, was honored Saturday at Lexington Catholic High School for 50 years of teaching martial arts in Lexington.

    He was treated with great respect during a tournament that attracted several hundred people of all ages from across the United States. Some even put a $100 bill in his hand for an autographed poster.

    Thé's years as a struggling student at the University of Kentucky in the 1960s led to his empire of Shaolin-Do schools in the United States. There used to be more than 80, but he now has about 50. One is on Gold Rush Road in Lexington.

    He estimates that all his schools over the years have taught 1 million students.

    The following is how Thé tells his story:

    He says his Shaolin-Do schools teach a curriculum of Chinese martial arts based on the Shaolin Temple, a Buddhist temple built sometime between 386 and 534 A.D. in China. Its teachings spread, and the temples were the equivalent of universities for the martial arts.

    Thé was born in Bandung, Indonesia, in 1943. His parents were Chinese but fled to Indonesia after the Communist Party came into power.

    Thé's parents were wealthy. His father ran a textile plant with about 1,200 workers, and his mother ran a jewelry store.

    According to a bio on his website, Sinthe.com, Thé was drawn to the martial arts at the age of 5.

    Thé eventually went to a class that taught empty hand forms, weapon forms and sparring. He eventually was accepted into the class and became a star student.

    He was groomed by a grandmaster to become the next grandmaster of Shaolin-Do. Only a grandmaster can name his replacement before retiring. (Thé says his replacement has not yet been born.)

    In 1964, Thé planned to go to school in Germany to study engineering and physics, but a friend of the family convinced him and his parents that he could get just as good an education at a lower cost at the University of Kentucky.

    Thé flew to Cincinnati and took a taxi to Lexington, which cost him all of the money he had.

    He began his studies at Transylvania University for a year in order to improve his English. To supplement his income, he started for the first time to teach Shaolin-Do to non-Chinese.

    His classes took off when he went to UK. Advertising in UK's student newspaper, The Kentucky Kernel, worked.

    In 1968, Thé became the youngest grandmaster in the history of the Shaolin martial arts.

    Thé was continuing his education at UK when the former grandmaster, Ie Chang Ming, died in 1976 at the age of 96.

    Thé said he realized that the world had plenty of engineers and scientists, but only one Shaolin grandmaster. He quit his studies and devoted all of his time to teaching the art of Shaolin-Do.

    He is now writing a book about his life. It will include his failed marriages and his three children. Daughter Denise Thé is a Hollywood scriptwriter who worked on CBS' Person of Interest TV show; son Dwight Thé teaches physical education at the University of California; and son Kevin Thé is a police detective in Tucson, Ariz.

    Thé calls himself a "spiritual but not religious person." His father was a Buddhist; his mother, a Seventh-day Adventist.

    Bill Leonard of Lexington calls Thé "one of the nicest human beings I've ever met."

    Leonard met Thé when Leonard was a 19-year-old student at UK who signed up for one of Thé's classes. Thé was 24.

    They became best friends. Leonard runs the Sin Thé Center in Lexington.

    "He probably has beaten me up more than anybody else, since we practice together," Leonard said.

    "But even after all these years, he never ceases in class to teach me something new — either about martial arts or being a human.

    "I hope he goes on forever."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •