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Thread: kung fu star trek people

  1. #16
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    moQbara (Klingon Martial Art)

    Gene Ching
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  2. #17
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    Not green lit yet but...

    Wait...is this really happening? If so, I'll have to split this into its own indie thread.

    DECEMBER 21, 2017 4:02pm PT by Aaron Couch
    Quentin Tarantino's 'Star Trek' Movie Taps 'Revenant' Screenwriter

    J.J. Abrams would produce the film.

    Quentin Tarantino is beaming up screenwriter Mark L. Smith.

    Smith, best known for penning Leonardo DiCaprio's The Revenant, is boarding the Star Trek film Tarantino is developing with producer J.J. Abrams, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

    The project first came to light earlier this month, when news broke that Tarantino had shared a pitch for a Star Trek film with Abrams, and the two had agreed to bring together a writers room to develop the film at Paramount, with Tarantino eyeing the director's seat.

    The idea of a Tarantino-helmed Star Trek comes nearly a decade after Abrams revitalized the franchise for the big screen with his 2009 reboot Star Trek, and followed it up with 2013's Star Trek Into Darkness. The most recent outing, Justin Lin's Star Trek Beyond (2016), got strong reviews but earned the least in the rebooted film series with just $343.4 million worldwide.

    Tarantino is a longtime fan and shared his love for Star Trek in a 2015 Nerdist podcast interview.

    "The only thing that limited them was their '60s budget and eight-day shooting schedule," he said. "You could take some of the classic Star Trek episodes and easily expand them to 90 minutes or more and really do some amazing, amazing stuff." The filmmaker also declared Star Trek: The Next Generation's "Yesterday's Enterprise" as one of the best Star Trek episodes ever written.

    Tarantino's next film is an untitled Charles Manson-themed project, which is due out in 2019.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    Mark L. Smith

    This is still in the 'rumor' phase. When there's a formal announcement, we'll split the thread.

    Quentin Tarantino's "Star Trek" Found its Scriptwriter
    2 months ago



    It shocked us all when we heard that Quentin Tarantino was working on a Star Trek project. Being a lifelong fan of the franchise, the director decided to make his own version and now, the details are slowly being released.



    Tarantino will be holding the reigns of the project, both directing and co-producing the film. He even managed to get JJ Abrams on board for the producing part. However, Tarantino himself won't be writing the script, and Paramount has been searching for someone to write it based on Tarantino's ideas. Now, finally, the scriptwriter has been named. The writer of "The Revenant" Mark L. Smith will be penning the script. Wow, this makes an unlikely trio.

    Since Tarantino is involved, and the R rating comes with him, this will be an interesting "Star Trek" to watch.



    No announcement regarding the cast or the release date has been made yet, but it is rumored that Patrick Stewart might reprise his role as Jean-Luc Picard.

    It will be some time until this project is ready for the theatres. Meanwhile, Tarantino is working on his 9th movie and it is set to release on 9 August 2019.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    More rumors

    ...but it's getting closer.

    Simon Pegg: Tarantino’s Star Trek May Not Be R-Rated
    By Sandy Schaefer 2 hours ago


    Simon Pegg as Montgomery "Scotty" Scott in Star Trek (2009)

    Simon Pegg has confirmed that Quentin Tarantino’s Star Trek movie idea is in active development, but isn’t sure that an R-rating is part of the package. Pegg took over the role of the USS Enterprise’s Chief Engineer Montgomery “Scotty” Scott starting in J.J. Abrams’ 2009 Star Trek movie franchise reboot. He has since reprised the role in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness and 2016’s Star Trek Beyond, the latter of which he also served as cowriter on. Pegg was then recruited to cowrite a fourth installment in the relaunched Trek series (aka. the Kelvin timeline), but the project’s status became uncertain after Beyond performed beloved commercial expectations at the box office.

    Even as CBS launched its All Access streaming series Star Trek: Discovery last fall, the Star Trek movie franchise appeared to have hit a roadblock that it couldn’t get past. Then, everything changed this past December with the unexpected news that Tarantino was developing a Star Trek movie with screenwriter Mark L. Smith (The Revenant), with the intention of directing it himself. It emerged shortly thereafter that, like all of his directorial efforts thus far, Tarantino’s Star Trek film would carry an R rating – a first for the Star Trek franchise. While Pegg’s Star Trek costars John Cho and Karl Urban have expressed interest in the idea, Pegg himself is cautioning that the R rating might not be set in stone.

    Speaking with HeyUGuys on the red carpet for the 2018 Empire Awards, Pegg spoke briefly about his upcoming role in Steven Spielberg’s Ready Player One and his return as Benji in this summer’s Mission: Impossible – Fallout. He also provided a small update on Tarantino’s Star Trek movie, including its potential rating:

    I don’t think [Quentin Tarantino has] written an R rated Star Trek script. I think what happened is he went to J.J. [Abrams] with an idea that he’s had for awhile. I remember he told us about it a long time ago. I think he told me and Edgar [Wright] about it a long time ago. He just put it to J.J. and I think J.J.’s just considering putting it into a writing room. We got an email just saying “Guess what? Guess who came into the office the other day?” So I don’t know much about it other than it’s in the mix, so we’ll see.


    That the filmmaker responsible for movies like Pulp Fiction, Kill Bill, and Inglourious Basterds would be interested in making a Star Trek movie understandably caught many people off-guard. However, the idea didn’t come completely out of left field and Tarantino has publicly expressed an interest in directing a Star Trek film in the past. Specifically, he has mentioned two Star Trek TV show episodes – the Original Series’ “The City on the Edge of Forever” and Next Generation‘s “Yesterday’s Enterprise” – that could serve as the basis for the project.

    The prospect of a Tarantino Star Trek movie is understandably polarizing, but Star Trek veterans William Shatner and Patrick Stewart have already voiced their interest in returning to the franchise if it means getting to work with the filmmaker. Even if the film winds up being rated PG-13 instead of R, it stands to reason that a Tarantino-helmed Star Trek adventure would have a harder edge than the more recent movies – which are already relatively gritty, by Star Trek standards. Discovery, as it were, has embraced a more adult tone than Star Trek TV shows past and helped to set the stage for a Tarantino spin on the sci-fi property in doing so. However, considering that Discovery has also proven to be somewhat divisive within the Trekkie community, that further supports the claim that Tarantino’s take on the property is destined for controversy.

    For the time being, a Tarantino Star Trek movie still isn’t a certainty and is at least a couple of years away. The filmmaker will begin shooting his next original project – the Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio-headlined Once Upon a Time in Hollywood – later this year, with a Summer 2019 release date target. Smith will continue to develop the script based on Tarantino’s Star Trek pitch in the meantime, so hopefully more concrete details about the film’s expected tone and rating will emerge as he continues to do so.
    FWIW, ST: Disco might have been R rated if the MPAA governed TV and if they ratcheted it up just a tad more. They dropped F-bombs and showed female Klingon boobs in ecstasy. srsly.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    James T. Kirk Straight Bourbon





    Among Starfleet’s legendary space explorers, it is Admiral James T. Kirk who most embodies the spirit of bold adventure.

    Born in the great state of Iowa on planet Earth in 2233, Kirk spent part of his youth on planet Tarsus IV, where he narrowly escaped death at the hand of the infamous Kodos the Executioner. Admitted to Starfleet Academy in 2250, Kirk was the only cadet to beat the infamous “Kobayashi Maru” test of character. As an ensign, he served on the Starship Republic, and his first posting after graduation in 2254 was aboard the U.S.S. Farragut.

    James Kirk took command of the Starship Enterprise in 2264 on a five-year voyage of deep-space exploration that made him a legend. During that time, he led one of the first missions beyond our galaxy, he averted a new war with the Romulan Empire, and he literally saved Earth history by going back in time to undo a temporal accident.

    Intensely loyal to his crew, Kirk did not hesitate to risk his career to rescue Spock, his first officer and friend, who was believed dead on the Genesis Planet. In one of Kirk’s most celebrated missions, he defied Starfleet Command to commandeer a stolen Klingon ship to prevent an ecological catastrophe from devastating his home world. Kirk entered a temporal anomaly in 2293 while helping to save the Starship Enterprise-B on its maiden voyage. He emerged in the year 2371, where he was killed while protecting the inhabitants of the Veridian system. He is buried on a mountaintop on Veridian III.

    Kirk explored strange, new worlds, led humanitarian missions, and brought peace to planets in conflict. He made first contact with new life and new civilizations, pushing outward the frontiers of knowledge as he explored boldly, where none had gone before. He represented humanity at its best, doing the things that humans do best.

    James T. Kirk Straight Bourbon celebrates his bold spirit of adventure.
    Should be brandy.

    Saurian brandy.

    That was Kirk's drink of choice.

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  6. #21
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    2018 Governors Award

    AUGUST 30, 2018 8:00am PT by Michael O'Connell
    'Star Trek' Gets 2018 Governors Award From TV Academy


    Photofest

    The franchise has produced more than 700 episodes of television.

    The original Star Trek may have never taken home an Emmy, but the entire franchise is nabbing a big kudos from The Television Academy. It's the recipient of the 2018 Governors Award.

    The prize, picked by the academy board of governors, will be presented to CBS Television Studios during the Sept. 8 Creative Arts ceremony. CBS has been the longtime shepherd of the sprawling franchise, one that's spanned 50 years on television across multiple series, 700 episodes and 13 motion pictures. (And while the original Star Trek may not have ever one an Emmy, the franchise has taken 30.)

    "Star Trek is the first television program I can remember watching as a child, and has always been ahead of its time," said Governors Award Committee chair Mark Spatny. "Not only have all the franchises promoted inclusiveness and acceptance of all people, and inspired creative thought about space exploration and our future, but the technical innovations sparked by the franchise are incredibly significant to the evolution of television production, and also to the communication and computer tools we use in our daily life. We are honored to present this award to a franchise that has made such a lasting contribution to both television and our society.”

    Star Trek has spent few moments outside the cultural conscious since Gene Roddenberry premiered the original in 1966. A string of successful rebooted films, with at least another still on deck, helped stir CBS into rebooting the TV franchise for streaming service All Access. Star Trek Discovery premiered last year.

    “For over 50 years, Star Trek has captivated and connected fans from around the world. What the series always brilliantly illustrated is that, despite our greatest differences, we as people are more alike than we realize, and coming together in hopes of a better tomorrow is not just a possibility, but a necessity,” said David Stapf, president of CBS Television Studios. “The impact of Star Trek is far-reaching, and has inspired not only countless individuals, but great advancements in technology, science, health care, space exploration and more. We are so grateful to the brilliant minds and talented individuals, both in front of and behind the camera, who boldly tell stories that stand the test of time. Thank you to the Television Academy for honoring the historic Star Trek legacy and to everyone who has contributed to its success.”
    Still boldly going...
    Gene Ching
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  7. #22
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    Worf's World

    Been saying this for years...

    Star Trek: Michael Dorn Thinks Worf Spinoff Would Be "Perfectly Timed"
    BY DAN ZINSKI – ON NOV 25, 2018 IN TV NEWS



    Star Trek actor Michael Dorn says now would be the right time for a spinoff series centered on his TNG character, the Klingon warrior and Starfleet officer Worf. After disappearing from the small screen landscape for over a decade following the cancellation of Star Trek: Enterprise, Trek is back in a big way thanks to the growing streaming service CBS All Access.

    The Trek TV renaissance kicked off with Star Trek: Discovery, a new adventure set years before the events of TOS, featuring a new starship and all new characters. The success of Discovery has now led All Access to go all-in on Trek, with future plans including a series centered on TNG Captain Jean-Luc Picard, as well as a second season of Discovery that will tie in more with the original Trek series. In addition, the network is developing an animated Trek series together with former Rick and Morty executive producer Mike McMahan. Overall, All Access wants Trek programming to go on year-round, making the streaming service a haven for Trekkies who can't get enough of their favorite sci-fi universe.

    With Trek back in full-force, Dorn has an idea for yet another spinoff bringing back a TNG character. Speaking to Inverse, Dorn pitched the idea of a series centered on his own character Worf, the Klingon who became a Starfleet lieutenant (and later showed up on Deep Space Nine as well). As Dorn explained, now would be the perfect time for a Worf series set outside the confines of Starfleet, that would explore what things are really like for the Klingon Empire. Dorn said:

    “This is, I think, perfectly timed and placed. You’re not stepping on anybody’s toes, and I always thought the Klingon Empire was a great empire to write about because it’s Shakespearean.”



    Dorn thinks depicting a changing Klingon Empire, where isolationism is out and the doors have been opened to other races, would be an interesting reflection of our own ever-more-integrated global situation. He said:

    “The Klingon Empire has had to evolve and change and they don’t like that and they’re fighting it every step of the way. They’ve had to introduce aliens into their society. Just like our world now is becoming a global world where it’s not just like, ‘Oh we’re Californians and that’s all that really matters.’ We’re talking about something here and it affects China.”

    Of course, Dorn was careful to mention that the new show would have plenty of action to go with all the Klingon politics. He also says the show should be episodic, like TOS and TNG, instead of having a season-long arc like Discovery.

    And if Dorn's Worf series never sees the light of day, the actor says he is indeed amenable to appearing on All Access' planned Picard series starring his old captain Patrick Stewart. However, Dorn says he would only do it if he has a substantial role and is not merely offered a cameo. With so many Star Trek offerings being developed by All Access, Dorn's idea for a non-Starfleet Klingon story seems like something Alex Kurtzman and CBS might actually consider. In the meantime, the Klingons will be back (without Worf) for season 2 of Discovery, and this time they will have hair.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
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    A Claymore. You're a beauty!



    Your Montgomery Scott Scotch Awaits
    StarTrek.com Staff
    November 28, 2018

    Aye, laddie, Scotty would drink to this: Silver Screen Bottling Co. has just announced that Montgomery Scott Scotch will join James T. Kirk Bourbon, James T. Kirk Bourbon Reserve and Ten-Forward Vodka as part of the line of Star Trek branded spirits they've launched this year.

    The blended scotch whisky -- and, yes, the Scots spell it without the "e" -- is available for pre-sale starting today, priced at $49.99, at www.MontgomeryScottScotch.com. Shipping will begin in March 2019.



    Montgomery Scott Scotch is a limited batch produced in Glasgow by one of the most-awarded distilleries in Scotland. It's exceptionally smooth, with just a slight smoky note.



    The entire Star Trek line of spirits is available for purchase at www.silverscreenbottling.com. Additional products will be added in the future.
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  9. #24
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    More on Netflix tH8 + a star trek tease

    Exclusive: Quentin Tarantino Tells Us How and Why He Created ‘The Hateful Eight’ Miniseries for Netflix
    Posted on Wednesday, May 1st, 2019 by Chris Evangelista



    A month ago, word arrived that an extended version of Quentin Tarantino‘s 2015 Western The Hateful Eight would be arriving on Netflix. Many (including this writer) assumed this was going to be the Roadshow Cut – a cut that played in limited theatrical release, and was never released on home video. But that’s not what happened.

    Instead, The Hateful Eight arrived on Netflix broken into a miniseries, consisting of four episodes. How, and why, did this happen? And was Tarantino involved? It turns out he was. The filmmaker curated and oversaw the new miniseries cut himself.

    Tarantino spoke to /Film exclusively about how the Hateful Eight Netflix miniseries came together. The filmmaker also spoke of a new director’s cut of another one of his films, and whether or not he’s going to make that rumored Star Trek movie.

    So I guess my two big questions on this are how and why; how did this come about and how much input did you have into it? And what was the genesis of it, breaking it up into these episodes?

    Well, we finished the whole run of the movie. And I had no reason at this time to put the Roadshow version out; because that was [its own thing]…it was about that 70 millimeter screening. So as far as [releasing] the whole prologue and the intermission, that didn’t seem to really make much sense, unless it was playing on TCM Roadshow week or something.

    So Netflix came to us and said, “Hey, look, if you’d be interested–if there’s even more footage, [and] if you’d be interested in putting it together in a way that we could show it as three or four episodes, depending on how much extra footage you have, we’d be willing to do that.”

    And I thought, wow, that’s really intriguing. I mean, the movie exists as a movie, but if I were to use all the footage we shot, and see if I could put it together in episode form, I was game to give that a shot.

    So about a year after it’s released, maybe a little less, me and my editor, Fred Raskin, we got together and then we worked real hard. We edited the film down into 50 minute bits, and we very easily got four episodes out of it. We didn’t re-edit the whole thing from scratch, but we did a whole lot of re-editing, and it plays differently. Some sequences are more similar than others compared to the film, but it has a different feeling. It has a different feeling that I actually really like a lot. And there was [already] a literary aspect to the film anyway, so it definitely has this “chapters unfolding” quality.

    There’s been some debate about whether or not there’s new footage–

    Yeah, it’s really frustrating that on one hand, it seems like every website in the world wants to write about it, but no one wants to actually watch it. So they could actually see for themselves if it’s different. Like, 42 different websites would rather speculate on if it’s different rather than just watch it. So it’s all this misconception. “Oh, they’re just replaying the credits…it’s just only what was in the roadshow version.” No! I don’t know [an exact] timeline as far as how much new footage is in it, but it’s something like about, like, 25 minutes if not more.

    And there are sequences that play very different. You know, one of the things in it that I like a lot, and it was one of the things [that] didn’t quite work in the feature, we had moved on, but in this kind of situation it was different. Have you seen the movie?

    Yes.

    Okay. So when you have the situation where the four passengers come in, and take over the place and kill everybody, and they kind of set up the place for when the stagecoach arrives.

    Well, the way it’s in the [original] movie is, instead of me saying, “But then when John Ruth and Daisy arrived…”, that’s when we cut out of that sequence, and go back….What we’re able to do in this version, is John Ruth and Daisy now enter the place, and you see the entire sequence again. John Ruth and Daisy enter Minnie’s Haberdashery, except now it’s not told from John Ruth and Daisy’s perspective. It’s told from the killers’ perspective…We know what they’ve done, and we know how they set up, and we know Daisy knows who they are…So we see how Tim Roth and how Michael Madsen and how Daisy are reacting to each other, while John Ruth is oblivious.
    continued next post
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  10. #25
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    Continued from previous post




    I have a question just about the movie itself. I’m wondering if you yourself think this movie came out like a year or two early. I remember this came out Christmas 2015 and I remember there was this – I loved the movie, first of all, I think it’s fantastic. But it’s a really brutal movie. It deals with misogyny and racism, and obviously those things aren’t new. They’ve always been there, but it seems like a year later, you know, we had the election and all this…all this ugly stuff that I feel like a lot of Americans thought was buried came out again, in full force. And when that happened, it made me think of this movie a lot because I feel like the movie is dealing with that in some way.

    Yeah, they’re still fighting the war…in their own racist terms.

    It felt like if this had come out in 2016 instead of 2015 the reaction would have been so much different, just because that ugliness was at the forefront again.

    Well, just so you’ll know, I read your piece. I was really taken with it. I really liked it. I, uh, I appreciate you calling us prescient. I have to say…I didn’t really think about it [at the time]. Like I knew I had made an ugly little movie. And if you make an ugly little movie people might not respond so great, okay, that goes with wanting to make something, uh, this rancid. But I love it…but I can understand it’s not really a dish for everybody but the truth of the matter is, I didn’t think about any of that. I just thought it was just the nature of the beast. But when I read your piece, I was like, “Hey, he might have a point.”

    So going back to the Netflix element, would you want to do something like this again, for like, say, [Kill Bill] The Whole Bloody Affair? Or is this a one time thing for you?

    [There’s] the idea that now you can make a movie, and the movie is the movie, and the movie has all the limitations that the movie has that a novel doesn’t have, that’s the way it is. But the idea that after that, after that is done, after that movie is said and done, not that that’s just some ghost or some weird little version, but the idea that you could have a fuller version come out, after the fact, that’s kind of exciting. That’s kind of interesting. Now, in the case of Kill Bill the Whole Bloody Affair, Kill Bill is the one movie I’ve made where everything I shot is in the movie, because we had two movies.

    But for instance, take Django [Unchained], I’ve actually cut a director’s cut of Django. That’s about like three hours and 15 minutes, or three hours and 20 minutes, something like that. That’s one I wouldn’t do as a miniseries, because it would just be better [as a movie]. I thought about that idea, but that would just work better as one movie. Just a longer one as far as I was concerned. So I’ve actually done that. We’re just kind of waiting some time after Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, and we’ll release that eventually.

    And what’s the status of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood?

    I’m on the mix-stage right now.

    I feel like I have to ask this even though I don’t know if you’ll want to answer. But are you going to make a Star Trek movie? Is there any truth to that?

    It’s a very big possibility. I haven’t been dealing with those guys for a while cause I’ve been making my movie. But we’ve talked about a story and a script. The script has been written and when I emerge my head like Punxsutawney Phil, post-Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, we’ll pick up talking about it again.

    With the Hateful Eight Netflix cut, what would you say to interest people; to tell them this is something new instead of just what they’ve seen before?

    Well if you like the movie, the movie is a movie, and I worked really hard [on it]. So even if I come out with a version that has more stuff in it, that doesn’t invalidate the first version.

    The first version is what we chose to be the movie. But now if you’ve seen that, and you like that, and you want more, this version gives you more…and it gives you more in a slightly different format. The movie doesn’t necessarily need to be like one longer movie. It was a pretty long movie [to begin with]. But this gave me an opportunity to, rather than just make a super duper epic, I could actually use all of my ideas…my scripts are always told with really complex narrative ideas…

    Now, in the course of editing a movie, a lot of those ideas go by the wayside, because ultimately it’s not serving your purpose for making a linear movie. But in this case, I was able to put it all back in. And if you’re just watching it like a chapter at a [time], which is basically 50 minutes at a time, then you’re able to absorb it. And in a fun way, you’re able to look at it slightly differently. Do you want to keep watching it? You can, but you don’t have to. Each episode ends it an emotional place and you’re also able to see the whole original narrative complexity of the whole piece.



    This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.
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  11. #26
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    Star Trek: Picard | SDCC Trailer - Sir Patrick Stewart Returns

    Gene Ching
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  12. #27
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    Boldly going...

    Q&A
    The Star Trek TV Universe is CBS All Access’ Secret Weapon. Will It Keep Expanding Infinitely?
    Talking to Star Trek showrunner Alex Kurtzman and CBS All Access' Julie McNamara about the franchise's streaming future.
    BY JOY PRESS
    NOVEMBER 29, 2019


    Patrick Stewart and Jonathan Frakes in the forthcoming CBS All Access series Picard.TRAE PATTON/CBS ALL ACCESS

    As genre franchises go, Star Trek has one of the longest legacies. With CBS preparing to merge with Viacom, a move that will unite the movies and TV series under the same roof via Paramount, some have suggested that it could become a new Marvel Universe for the conglomerate. Right now, there are two separate movies reportedly in the works from Noah Hawley and Quentin Tarantino. Meanwhile, the Star Trek television universe, overseen by Alex Kurtzman, serves as the centerpiece of the originals slate at CBS All Access, the network’s streaming platform.

    Unlike Netflix and Amazon, which whip out fresh series at a head-turning rate, CBS All Access has moved slowly, debuting a small number of original programs each year, including The Good Wife’s sterling spin-off The Good Fight, Jordan Peele’s Twilight Zone reboot and the glossy Marc Cherry drama Women Who Kill. But the Trek-verse has been the streamer’s secret weapon ever since the 2017 launch of Star Trek: Discovery. It kept doubling down on the bet with short-form series Star Trek: Short Treks and Picard (premiering in January, starring Patrick Stewart), and several more in the works like the animated Star Trek: Lower Decks and Section 31, a series that has Michelle Yeoh reprising her character from Discovery.

    “We're in the middle of a merger, and there are a lot of assets that this joint company has that I don't know entirely how that will [come] together,” Julie McNamara, CBS All Access executive vice president of original content, told me last month. “I know that streaming and CBS All Access specifically are a huge priority for the company,” she said. As are originals. “The people who come for originals are by far the stickiest subscribers.... For something like the Star Trek universe, we are putting a ton of resources toward it and we're using serialized storytelling [so] that show is sort of premium version in that universe.” We were talking during the Women in Entertainment Summit in Los Angeles, where she and Kurtzman spoke to me about CBS All Access plans for Star Trek as well as Kurtzman’s other upcoming projects for the platform, like his political miniseries about James Comey, based on the FBI director’s memoir and starring Jeff Daniels and his adaptation of The Man Who Fell to Earth, which he will make with Jenny Lumet.

    Vanity Fair: Tell me about the development process of Picard. Did the fact that you were creating it for CBS All Access change how you conceived of it?

    Kurtzman: Julie and I were very excited about the idea of bringing Patrick back. But... he did not want to come back. He said he was never going to play that part again. So we entered into that knowing Patrick is going to have a major, major voice in whatever this becomes if we're going to get him to say yes. He doesn't want to repeat what he's done already, which was by the way, the best bar he could have put forward. The show is inspired by Next Gen, and it's written by people who grew up loving it but it is very much not Next Gen. It feels like a modern adult drama in the world of Star Trek, which has not actually really happened before. It's also singularly about a man in his emeritus years and there are very few franchises that would allow you to have an almost 80 year old lead and tell his story.

    It's not like we ever had conversations where All Access said, "Look, we really want it to be this or we really want it to be that." If anything, I think we were coming to them and saying, "Here's what's emerging from the room," and trying to give them real time assessments as the story was breaking. It didn't follow a particularly traditional development process either. Usually there's an outline and then there's everybody reads it and they give notes. We didn't go through that either and I think that was a testament to the trust that Julie gave us.

    The writers' room for Picard has Patrick Stewart as well as novelists Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman. It must’ve been an interesting room.

    Kurtzman: Yes, it was a lot of very strong voices. But the thing that was great about it was that everybody wanted the same thing. So those voices formed a wonderful chorus as opposed to pulling in a bunch of different directions. And everybody has a different superpower in that room, which is exciting, you know what I mean? Because you're like, "OK, what are you going to bring?”

    What was Patrick Stewart arguing for?

    Kurtzman: Nothing that felt familiar. His constant refrain was: I don't want to do what I've already done. Obviously it's not a secret that the Borg were involved, and his first instinct was not to do the Borg. He was like, "I did that story. I don't want to do that story." And we couldn't just say, "Yeah, but we loved you in it so much, we just want to do that again." And what ended up emerging was actually as a result of that back and forth, a very unique and very different Borg story. Definitely not one that you could have told in Next Generation. And certainly not what I think anyone's expecting.

    Star Trek: Discovery stars a number of women of color. Can you tell me about the conversation behind that?

    McNamara: We certainly feel that it's important to reflect the culture on our service. And that's not just altruistic, although it is a good and important thing. It's also good business. You really want to reach people in a way that feels specific in terms of characters and story telling.

    Kurtzman: About three years ago when, when CBS asked me to consider doing another Star Trek, my first instinct was: it's got to be a woman and it's got to be a woman of color. I'm not interested in having another male captain. We made that very clear and a condition of our involvement and Julie was immediately supportive of it. And one thing I remember very clearly was that we were still casting the morning Trump was elected and somehow in the casting conversation this question came up like, okay, do we have to reconsider this? And we doubled down and said, this is exactly why we have to do this right now. And for me personally, I have a harder time writing men—that's the truth. I don't know why. It's always been the case.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  13. #28
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    Continued from previous post

    Michelle Yeoh is going to be the lead of a spinoff based on her role as Philippa Georgiou. Where are you with that show?

    McNamara: We are very excited about the Section 31 show and Michelle Yeoh is excited to do it. She is in the current season of Discovery so she's working on that right now but we have scripts getting written, and Alex has a writer's room. We love what we've heard so far. It's yet another tonality of Trek. As Alex has mapped it all out, each show has its own unique sort of voice and vision.

    What’s the tonality of this one?

    Kurtzman: What we don't want is for you to watch one show and be like, well I don't really need to watch that other Star Trek show cause I've already watched Discovery or whatever. So to me Section 31 is sort of like the black ops CIA division of Star Trek and it was established in Deep Space 9. Full credit goes to Michelle Yeoh for coming to me and saying in season one, before we even launched, “I want to do a spin off of my character!” With Michelle Yeoh, it's very hard to say no.

    This was like a year before Crazy Rich Asians came out and we had not launched Discovery yet. No one had seen it. So I was like, let's have one show that hopefully people like and we can talk about it. Once Discovery happened, I brought it to Julie and she immediately said, great, let's develop it. Erica [Lippoldt] and Bo Yeon [Kim], two writers on our Discovery staff, started writing a pilot and it's really different. It occupies an area of the Trek universe that's never really been explored geographically. It has a new mythology to it, which is very interesting. And it puts Michelle's character to the test in a lot of ways that Discovery can't. In some ways it will be her Unforgiven, I would say.

    When we're talking about inclusivity we're also talking in terms of age, too, because these are some seasoned actors and actresses.

    Kurtzman: The beauty of Star Trek and its vision—and I take no credit for this at all—is that it imagined a world where all of these things that we're talking about now were not conversation pieces. Race, diversity, gender, sexual preference. Those are things we don't talk about in the world of Star Trek. We've just moved past all that and it's gorgeous. It's the most amazing ideal and it's part of why I think it's survived for 50 plus years—because there's people who would like to believe that our best selves will emerge in the future…..Star Trek was a pioneer in allowing people to see themselves on screen in a genre that they had never seen themselves before. This has never hit harder for me than when I got to spend an afternoon with Dr. Mae Jemison, who was the first female African American astronaut in space. I fell madly in love with her and I asked, why [become] an astronaut? And she said, “Uhura! I saw Uhura!” So I felt that responsibility... to create more Uhurus.

    There's a real tug of war over over talent these days. Why go with CBS All Access?

    Kurtzman: Julie and I met, what was it, 18 years ago? We have a long relationship with each other and the thing that I need most, anywhere I go, is trust…. Julie never says, this is what you can and can't do. It's, what can you dream up and how can I make it possible? On network there's rigid time constraints and there's rules about what you can and can't say or can't show. We don't have any of those strictures on All Access.

    You’re also working together on a miniseries about James Comey. The news moves so fast that it’s impossible to imagine what the political world will look like when your project is ready. Does that matter?

    Kurtzman : I don't think it will because it is honestly a documentation of what happened—it has been crafted to be a historical record. We actually are not interested in rewriting the past. Many people are, but we're not!

    McNamara: I think of it in the sense of something like Game Change or Recount, where you felt like it was very much about the events of a relatively small period of time. And the important thing is that it feel resonant and relevant to an audience when they're watching that. And it'll be interesting to see where the culture is and who is running the country...but I think what the material essentially talks about is way bigger in terms of our democracy.

    As a character, Comey is not your prestige cable antihero...

    Kurtzman: He's divisive. ... We all have a bias. We all were like, he's the guy whose choices ended up turning the election. And the fact is that it's much more complicated than that. ... It was a confluence of many, many people and many, many events.

    McNamara: I also think it's fascinating to look at individuals in what turns out to be a pivotal moment in history. Let's say, hypothetically, you're taking an essentially good man and you're putting him in a situation where the tides of the culture are shifting in ways that maybe he doesn't see.... They're just real people making decisions in real time.

    This interview has has been edited and condensed for clarity.
    We don't have a Picard thread yet, just a trailer on the kung fu star trek people thread. Maybe we'll split that off some day.

    We do have a Section 31 thread. It's Michelle.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #29
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    WTH did I just watch?

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  15. #30
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    Kirk FU!

    We've been talking about Kirk Fu for years.

    I need another martial arts book like I need another blow to my head, but I need this in my library.

    My birthday is coming up...


    Credit: Insight Editions
    MASTER THE CAPTAIN'S MARTIAL ARTS MOVES IN NEW STAR TREK: KIRK FU MANUAL
    Contributed by Jeff Spry
    Feb 6, 2020

    Aside from making amorous advances on attractive Enterprise crew members and scantily clad alien slave girls, Star Trek's Captain James T. Kirk was particularly adept at hand-to-hand combat against a variety of foes of extraterrestrial, android, and human origins. His uncanny fighting style was a potent blend of old-fashioned, Eastern-influenced martial arts, Greco-Roman wrestling, and a generous dose of pure macho bravado.

    To gain further insight into Kirk's kickass methods of self-defense, Insight Editions is releasing Star Trek: Kirk Fu Manual, an essential how-to guide that every capable Starfleet cadet needs to carry in their footlocker as the ultimate training tool to survive the final frontier.

    Dropping out of orbit and into book stores and comics shops on March 3rd, this playful 64-page instruction book is written by noted Star Trek novelist Dayton Ward and accompanied by amusing cartoon-style art from Italian illustrator Christian Cornia.

    Kirk Fu powers into a series of unarmed combat techniques you can learn, developed by perhaps Starfleet’s most legendary starship captain over many years of hostile encounters with alien species on a variety of exotic new worlds.

    "Star Trek: Kirk Fu was an idea I submitted to Chris Prince, my editor at Insight Editions while I was still working with him on another Star Trek-themed book, Hidden Universe Travel Guide – Star Trek: Vulcan," Ward tells SYFY WIRE. "I’d been writing Star Trek novels and short stories for a number of years at that point, and writing something more whimsical and humorous was something I’d wanted to do for a long time. I’d already written an article about my “favorite Kirk fight scenes” for StarTrek.com so the idea for the book came from there as much as anywhere."



    Via a virile blend of various fighting methodologies, Kirk Fu welcomes the refined elements of several Earth-based martial arts forms as well as more primitive methods displayed in barrooms and back alleys on numerous planets throughout the galaxy. Unorthodox in practice yet incredible to behold, one must admit that its extreme artistry achieves a level of effective wonder.

    Including revealing excerpts from Kirk’s private notes and personal logs, the Star Trek: Kirk Fu Manual is an ideal training guide for wayward star voyagers as a means of self-preservation in an angry universe.

    Ward greatly admires a couple of Kirk's signature moves he himself might or might not attempt on antagonistic literary colleagues.

    "Anything with that flying drop kick (“The Flying Drop Kirk” in the book) is how you know Kirk is truly serious about the fight," he reveals. "He’s just throwing his entire body into the thing and **** the consequences! A cousin to this has to be that crazy move where he launches himself off the wall (“The Jimmy Wall Banger”). It’s hilarious, like he found a copy of that Neo/Morpheus Kung Fu scene from The Matrix and decided to make the move his own."


    Credit: Insight Editions

    Cornia's stimulating art enhances the entire project on every hilarious page.

    "Christian’s style is absolutely perfect," Ward adds. "From the beginning, I wanted Kirk’s anecdotes and the descriptions to play the gag straight – at least for the most part - with the bulk of the humor coming from the illustrations and step-by-step diagrams. I still managed to get a few small jokes into the text, but I think we can agree what I’m describing is absolutely insane, and Christian did the heavy lifting so far as communicating the absurdity of the entire thing.

    "With all of that said, the book is intended as an expression of unabashed love for the original Star Trek – the one I grew up with – and appreciation for Kirk the character as well as the man who’s embodied him for more than fifty years: the one and only William Shatner. He’s one of the childhood heroes for a guy who’s still got more than little bit of kid still rattling around inside him."


    Credit: Insight Editions
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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