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Thread: SHAOLIN COWBOY (the comic)

  1. #16
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    The Return of Shaolin Cowboy

    I was wondering where this was going...
    NYCC: Geof Darrow's "Shaolin Cowboy" Returns in 2012
    LEGENDARY ENTERTAINMENT
    Sun, October 16th, 2011 at 5:53am PDT|Updated: October 16th, 2011 at 5:57am



    Five years after it’s initial run ended, Geof Darrow’s (Hard Boiled, Big Guy and Rusty) returns in 2012!

    Originally published by Burlyman Entertainment, Shaolin Cowboy is a loaf of wry in a wonder bread world, a nicotine patch in a ten pack-a-day universe. He wonders as he wanders through a world where yesterday, today and tomorrow exist in a collage of carnage of his own making!

    “Geof Darrow's relationship with Dark Horse goes back to the early days of the company. I can't tell you how excited I am to again be publishing his amazing work” said Dark Horse president, Mike Richardson. “Geof's art literally stopped me in my tracks when I first met him more than two decades ago and his work is every bit as stunning today. Geof has influenced a generation of artists and I am proud and excited to have him back partnered with Dark Horse.”

    

Shaolin Cowboy returns with all-new stories in 2012!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #17
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    Three more

    Follow the link for more promo images
    Oct 18th 2011 By: Caleb Goellner
    Geof Darrow's 'Shaolin Cowboy' Returns in 2012 With Three New Issues From Dark Horse

    Geof Darrow's Shaolin Cowboy seemed to, at least temporarily, ride off into the sunset in 2007, leaving fans of the Hard Boiled and Big Guy and Rusty artist's hyper-detailed, gorgeously choreographed fantasy western adventure with only seven issues to savor. Fans needn't say "thanks for the memories," any longer, however, as Dark Horse Comics will release three more issues of Shaolin Cowboy in 2012. Judging from Dark Horse's new promo art for the issues, which will kick off with a new number one, they'll have everything fans of the original books had grown to love. There's strange bounty hunters, monster-sized mounted animals, dinosaurs, and the book's unnamed former Shaolin monk-turned cowboy poised for what will surely be explosive battles.

    From Dark Horse's press release:

    "Geof Darrow's relationship with Dark Horse goes back to the early days of the company. I can't tell you how excited I am to again be publishing his amazing work" said Dark Horse president, Mike Richardson. "Geof's art literally stopped me in my tracks when I first met him more than two decades ago and his work is every bit as stunning today. Geof has influenced a generation of artists and I am proud and excited to have him back partnered with Dark Horse."

    To date, Shaolin Cowboy's seven issues from Burlyman haven't been collected in English. Superfans who read French and/or Spanish have access to Panini's releases, but so far there's not an easy way to pick up the previous titles. Dark Horse hasn't announced plans to collect the previous material yet, which means now is as good a time as any to start begging them to.

    One minor difference between the original Shaolin Cowboy series and the upcoming issues is that the opening dialogue won't be written by the Wachowski siblings. Depending on how you felt about the last two Matrix movies, it may not feel like a huge loss (though most CA staffers are unabashed Speed Racer fans).

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #18
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    shaolin vs. zombies

    Dec 1st 2011 By: Caleb Goellner
    Geof Darrow's 'Shaolin Cowboy' Versus an Insanely Detailed Zombie Horde [Exclusive]

    Geof Darrow's been busy at the drawing board preparing for the 2012 return of Shaolin Cowboy through Dark Horse Comics, and we've got a characteristically intricate new piece of art from the first issue to prove it. Last time we saw art from Shaolin Cowboy #1, the title's silent protagonist was taking a tortoise for a spin and mounting a few other unconventional steeds such as a bulldog and a dinosaur. He was also bracing himself for combat against a savage winged lizard. Now it seems the star of the title has an extremely elaborate horde of undead humans on his hands. You will definitely want to see our exclusive preview of Darrow's latest epic Shaolin Cowboy #1 image after the jump.

    I love his double-chainsaw-ended cudgel.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  4. #19
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    Overdue ttt

    There used to be an arcade/bar at the S.F. Metreon that was based on Moebius art. It was very cool.

    CCI: Geof Darrow Remembers Moebius, Talks Animated "Shaolin Cowboy"
    Posted: 22 hours ago


    Artist/writer Geof Darrow discussed his career and friendships with Moebius and Frank Miller during his CCI spotlight panel

    A casual crowd joined Geof Darrow at this year's Comic-Con International in San Diego for a moderator-free panel spotlighting Darrow's work and career. Before the acclaimed artist/writer could get started, a representative from the Comic-Con arrived and, with very little fanfare, awarded him the Inkpot Award. Darrow simply said, "Thanks", set the award aside and started his panel.

    "I wouldn't be here today if it wasn't for one person," Darrow said. "A gentleman named Jean Giraud, who also went by the name Moebius." The crowd enthusiastically applauded the mention of the late artist, who passed away in March of 2012. Darrow said that his own art was deeply inspired by the work of Moebius.

    Darrow told the story of his first meeting with Moebius, who had come to Los Angeles to work on the Disney movie "Tron." Through a few connected friends, Darrow tried to arrange a meeting with Moebius just so he could "shake his hand." Darrow was shocked when his friend called back and said, "We're going out to dinner with him on Saturday night."

    "We talked, and I didn't really tell him what I did. He finally asked and I said, 'I draw,'" Darrow recalled. Moebius eventually looked over some of Darrow's work and enjoyed it. "He said we should do something together. So I moved to France. We did this thing called 'City of Fire' together, and that put me on the map."

    Moebius eventually introduced Darrow to artist/writer Frank Miller. The two became friends and after some time, Miller asked if Darrow would be interested in doing a story with him. "I said sure -- what do you want to do? And he said, 'I don't care what it is, as long as it's action-packed!'" Darrow laughed. "The first thing we were going to do was a Daredevil story, but Daredevil wasn't even in his costume in the whole thing and I said, if I was going to do it, I want to draw him in the costume. So Frank said we'd do something else." The next project Miller pitched was "Hardboiled."

    "I don't do it on purpose, but I'm like a remora. I attach myself to this bigger White Shark killing machine in the industry and I just ride along, sucking off their nutrients."

    Years later, Darrow got a call from Warner Brothers to see if he would be interested on working on a new science fiction film. The movie was "The Matrix" by then unknown directors, Larry and Andy Wachowski. Darrow said that the Wachowski brothers were impressed that he would not agree to work on the film unless he could read the script. "I read it and loved it," he said. Darrow was asured that if the movie was a success, his contribution to the film would be known. "They fought for my credit… I got a full title card for the movie," he said. "None of that would have happened if not for Moebius."

    Next, Darrow showed the crowded footage for an aborted animated version of "Shaolin Cowboy." The footage featured the Shaolin Cowboy fighting a giant crab monster and teaming up with a talking poodle. Despite some sequences being nothing more than penciled sketches and the clip having no audio, it was clear that it was a story heavy on action and humor and the audience enjoyed it immensely.

    Darrow said that the Japanese animators who worked on the abandoned propject had a hard time working with of the ideas and imagery in "Shaolin Cowboy." "They did not like the way he looked. At one point, they turned him into -- I swear, he looked just like Avatar from the TV show. I said, 'That's not him,' and they said that the way I draw him, he looks kinda heavy. I said, yeah, and they told me Japanese people were not ready for that." He also said they took issue with the way he drew woman, since they he did not draw them with the aim of making them all look young and attractive. "They don't all have those cantaloupe, melon-sized breasts. I drew them like real people."

    Unfortunately for everyone looking forward to the final product, the project fell apart after the American financers backed out. "They need like three million to finish it. Maybe they'll get it, but I kinda doubt it at this point."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #20

    The shaolin cowboy adventure magazine

    Not quite a comic, but it looks like there will be some neat art in it as well.
    Best selling author Andrew Vachss teams with award-wining artist Geof Darrow to revive the spirit and format of the pulp novels of the 30s and 40s. The Shaolin Cowboy Adventure Magazine is the first new hero-pulp to be printed in decades and combines hard-hitting prose with illustrated mayhem. The Shaolin Cowboy: The Way of ‘No Way!’ is a kung fu gripping tale of high adventure and relentless bloodshed. The Shaolin Cowboy and his trusty mule battle overwhelming odds and inclement weather against enemies thirsting for revenge and retribution in the battle royal to end all battle royals.
    seems a bit pricey though

  6. #21
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    Vinyl fig

    Nov 30th 2012 By: Caleb Goellner
    Geof Darrow-Designed Shaolin Cowboy Vinyl Figure Coming In February

    It may still be tragically difficult to get your hands on the original Shaolin Cowboy comic book miniseries by Geof Darrow and the Wachowskis, but the silent hero of the fantastical west has been making a killer comeback nonetheless. Darrow teamed with writer Andrew Vachss for the recently-released The Shaolin Cowboy Adventure Magazine through Dark Horse and is now expanding into collectibles with a limited edition vinyl figure from toymaker Wednesday's Finest. Designed by Darrow himself and crafted by renowned sculptor Monster5 (who has done stellar work on Johnny Ryan's Prison Pit characters, among other projects), the figure stands 14" tall and is limited to 500 pieces, 200 of which will sport an alternate colorway of Darrow's choice. Fans have until February to save up for the suggested retail price of $110, or you can pre-order one now if you're able to divert holiday shopping funds to, y'know, treat yourself.

    Get them below:
    Shaolin Cowboy now available for pre-orders

    Geof Darrow’s Shaolin Cowboy, Sculpt by Monster 5. Pre-Order Now/Ships 2/2013
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #22
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    Oct 9

    C2E2: Geof Darrow Heralds the Return of "The Shaolin Cowboy"
    Sat, April 27th, 2013 at 5:58am PDT | Updated: April 27th, 2013 at 8:29am
    Daniel Glendening, Guest Contributor



    Dark Horse Comics and Geof Darrow are bringing back "The Shaolin Cowboy" this October. Originally premiering as a seven issue series from 2004-2007 from Burlyman Entertainment, Darrow returns to "Cowboy" nearly six years later in a three issue monthly story arc, with the second issue clocking in at 64 pages.

    The original series followed the titular Cowboy on a journey through a desert outside of time, taking place in "the middle of nowhere, the day before yesterday and a week before tomorrow." Accompanied by an incessantly chattering mule, the cowboy found himself hunted by all those he had wronged in life, including a kung-fu master -- who also happened to be a crab -- and a few wise-cracking demons. The Cowboy traverses exotic locales, from the sun blasted desert to the belly of a giant, world-bearing lizard. The action sequences splatter blood with absurdist abandon, climaxing with an airborne, sword-wielding great white shark being cleaved by a chainsaw attached to a pole.

    CBR News spoke with Darrow about his return to "The Shaolin Cowboy," touching on how the comic is an unhinged, gleeful extrapolation of the form.

    CBR News: Geof, how does the upcoming "Shaolin Cowboy" series relate to its predecessor? Is this a continuation of that story, or something totally new?

    Geof Darrow: It has more action!

    Where is this story taking the Cowboy, and what sort of dark forces is he be facing?

    Joseph Campbell would have liked this question. Why dark forces? He may be up against light forces!

    Will we be seeing any recurring characters?

    Eventually.

    Characters surrounding the Cowboy talk incessantly -- almost, it seems, without really saying anything at all, while the Cowboy himself is largely silent. Why this choice?

    Robert Mitchum in "Out of the Past" said: "I've never learned anything listening to myself talk."

    As both artist and writer, you have control over not only the story but the visual aesthetic -- in what ways are you utilizing the visual language to propel the story?

    I feel like I'm back in art school -- which might not be a bad idea -- and my Fine Arts teacher is asking me why I drew a toilet strangling a dog.

    Are you a "let the work speak for itself" kind of guy?

    Sometimes.

    I fear I might sound pretentious -- there are those kind of folks who like to talk about stuff like that and are quite good at it. I just draw pictures I want to draw, if that makes any sense.

    I also hate to raise folks' expectations and fail to let the work match the crap that tumbles out of my mouth.

    "Shaolin Cowboy" is about a guy going from point A to point Z, dealing with what comes in-between. It's mostly just a reason for me to try and draw some goofy stuff nobody else wants to draw, with as little pretension as possible. No Infinity Gauntlets in my books -- not yet anyway.

    Geof Darrow's "The Shaolin Cowboy" comes to Dark Horse Comics October 9
    As anticipated as a movie premiere...almost.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #23
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    Darrow interview

    There are more pix if you follow the link.
    Geof Darrow Promises Zombie Massacre in New "Shaolin Cowboy"
    Mon, August 19th, 2013 at 1:58pm PDT | Updated: 1 hour ago
    Comic Books
    Albert Ching, Senior Editor


    In late 2004, Geof Darrow -- already a revered artist for his Eisner-winning collaborations with Frank Miller, "Hard Boiled" and "The Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot" -- debuted "Shaolin Cowboy," featuring a wandering Shaolin monk engaging in surreal, violent escapades.

    Darrow both wrote and illustrated "Shaolin Cowboy," and won his third Eisner in 2006 for the series. The book ran for seven issues under Burlyman Entertainment (a publishing company founded by filmmakers Andy and Lana Wachowski, who Darrow worked with on the "Matrix" trilogy), but had been absent from stands since 2007 -- until the release of "The Shaolin Cowboy Adventure Magazine" from Dark Horse Comics last fall.

    Darrow is back at Dark Horse for a new four-issue "Shaolin Cowboy" miniseries starting in October, and CBR News talked to the creator about his latest output, working in the movie industry, what he likes about current comics, his recent Deadpool covers and the uniquely high severed head content in his upcoming books.

    CBR News: Geof, "Shaolin Cowboy" is a series that you've been doing in one form or another for about a decade, and you're coming back to it in a big way with this new miniseries. From your perspective, why was now the right time for a new series of "Shaolin Cowboy"?

    Geof Darrow: Because I had it done. [Laughs] I had went away, I was living in Japan for about a year working on this animated film, and then when I came back, I just had other stuff to do. I finally came back to the comic book. Every once in a while I get calls to work on some movie; it takes me away.

    And I've always liked the character, because he can do anything that I want him to do.

    It seems like a good vehicle to tell different types of stories.

    What little story there is. [Laughs] It's more like an excuse for me to draw whatever I want.

    Which has to be nice!

    Yeah! I was talking with Mike Mignola about it. I think that's what he's kind of doing, although with much more depth and profoundness than I am, in his "Hellboy in Hell."

    Did you miss doing comic books, and working in the format? After time away working in other areas, was that another motivating factor?

    Oh yeah. The thing with comics is, when I draw them, I can draw whatever I want. When you're working on a movie, you're drawing what they want. Sometimes it's a lot of fun; sometimes it can be kind of tedious.

    For me, it's always nerve-racking, because I'm always hoping I'm doing what they want, and trying to put myself in the head of the director, the producer; trying to not disappoint them. And that's not always easy to do.

    And there's always more people involved in movies, and changes that can happen in the process.

    I've never really cared about the changes. People always say, "How do you like the way they treated what you did on blah blah." I don't care. Because it's not my movie. It's the director's movie. If he is happy with what you've done, then you've done your job. "I drew the Annihilator Machine to have seven arms, and they only put four of them on there, that's just not right!" I'm not like that. You're working for someone. It's not your vision, it's their vision. That's my perspective on film work.

    With the new series of "Shaolin Cowboy" -- going into it, were there some different things that you wanted to do with this miniseries, artistically or story-wise, or are you mainly sticking with what works?

    I'm always just trying to draw better. [Laughs] That's all. I'm hoping every drawing I do is a little better than the one I did before. I try to come up with more interesting compositions, and hope that the storytelling is a little better.

    But I don't [think], "******, I'm going to blow the hinges off storytelling, and I'm going to bring a whole new thing to comics!" That's not me. I think guys like Frank Miller and Mike Mignola have done that, and a lot of other guys I'll forget to mention. Darwyn Cooke. But I'm not one of those guys. I just draw pictures. If the pictures look good, then I'm not too embarrassed. Then people will want to look at them, and they'll say, "Oh, that guy drew a pretty good severed head there. It looks like a severed head." [Laughs]

    I'm looking at the cover to #3 right now, and there appears to be more than a half-dozen severed heads on it.

    There are more severed heads in this series than I think any comic in history. When you see it, you'll see what I mean. [Laughs] It's basically a hundred pages of zombie carnage. I wanted to do my zombie massacre.

    I'm a big fan of the Romero movies, and "The Evil Dead." Sam Raimi, I think is just great. I can always watch "Evil Dead 2" and ["Army of Darkness"]. Even the dialogue just really cracks me up. Any man that can take a phrase like "groovy" and make it work in a movie -- now there's a profound fellow.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  9. #24
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    continued from previous

    Based on what's been released from the new "Shaolin Cowboy" so far, it definitely seems like you're not shying away from violence.

    It's cartoon violence. I was going to say I'm not directing it at dogs, but there are a few animals that don't do so well in this series. Well, actually, there's more than a few, now that I think about it. There's no cruelty to children at all.

    And that's not always a guarantee.

    But I do kill a robin in the first issue, trying to cash in on some of that "Death of Robin," Batman energy there.

    Given that, then, do you keep up pretty closely with the current comic book industry?

    Yeah, I like going to the comic store. I think Chris Burnham and Grant Morrison did a really good job. I think Chris is a really talented young man, and he looks like he could take a punch on top of it.

    I'll take your word for it.

    He's a good-looking young man, and he looks like he could hold his own in a bar fight. Watch, he'll go out tonight and test it. "I'm tired of letting Batman kick all the ass, I'm going to kick some myself."

    From your perspective as someone who has been in the industry for a while…

    And has done very little! For as long as I've been in it, I haven't done very much. [Laughs] It's amazing how little I've actually done.

    But do you look at the racks and see a lot of see good current material?

    Oh, yeah. I always go to the comic store, and look at what's going on. I'm a comic book fan, and always have been. I'm in Japan what they call an "otaku." I like all sorts of stuff.

    If you want to read a really cool comic, Drawn & Quarterly have put out this book called "Kitaro." which is a classic Japanese manga about a -- he's not a ghost, I don't know what he is. He's a one-eyed boy that fights monsters. They're kind of funny and touching. The artist is Shigeru Mizuki, who's just amazing. He's a one-armed guy who lost his arm in World War II. They're really beautifully done.

    To get back to films a bit, I wanted to ask a little bit more about your concept design for movies -- you worked on the "Matrix" movies and "Speed Racer," among others. Is there any one in particular that stands out to you, where you see a lot of your style or your concepts in the final product?

    It has to be "The Matrix." I worked pretty closely with [the Wachowskis], and they were very generous with me. They really let me do a lot on that movie, and I'm sure sometimes I confused them quite a bit. I really didn't think they would use what I did, but they did, and it was an amazing experience -- to get to see the whole process of making a movie, from the beginning right up to the end.

    It kind of annoys me -- on these websites, they'll go on, "Oh, this guy sucks, he did a ****ty job, blah blah blah." I get really ****ed off. I don't care how lousy a director is, and how bad a movie is, it's so much work, it's so much stress to make a movie, that it's amazing they even get one done. And even if it's bad, hat's off to them, because, man, they did it, they put it out there, and you get nothing but grief if it's bad. And if it's good, they generally find some reason to not give the proper guys the credit. From watching how hard the Wachowskis worked to get a movie made, it's just amazing.

    There are a lot of directors I don't think are very good, but, hell, I couldn't do it, and I don't care what anybody says, a lot of people couldn't. You have to have nerves of steel, because they'll just eat you up, and spit you out, and then eat you up again. And then they **** you out the second time.

    That seems to be consistent with a lot of creative endeavors.

    Even comics. Anything you do that you put out in the public, you're really kind of putting a target on yourself.

    There's really a lot of stuff I don't like. I'm not a big fan of people that swipe other people's work. I think that's pretty ****ty. But anybody that's out there doing it, my hat's off to them, because drawing comics is a lot of work. It's not all the things you want to draw. You've got to draw a lot of stuff that isn't a lot of fun -- a guy just walking down the street. I always try to find something in each drawing that is fun. That's why I put in all those goofy little details. I think, "Oh, this will make it kind of different."

    Recently you've done some varied material here and there, like the Marvel NOW! Deadpool covers, which, correct me if I'm wrong, I think was among your first work for Marvel?

    No, I've done some others over the years. I did a "Marvel Zombies" cover. It had Howard the Duck and Machine Man on it. I like that cover. It's got a flesh-eating robot. I asked them, "How does that work? Do zombie robots only eat other robots?" They said, "No, they consume flesh, which they turn into energy." Well, that doesn't really make him a zombie, because they haven't returned to life. [Laughs]

    I did a Fantastic Four poster a long time ago. I've done a few things. Not a lot.

    I had no idea who Deadpool was, to be quite honest. I thought he was an incarnation of Spider-Man. [Laughs] Look at the costume! The mask looks like Spider-Man. I thought he was one of those Spider-Man clones.

    I got tired of drawing presidents. It was hard drawing Abraham Lincoln getting hit. I didn't want to draw that.

    It was like a zombie Abraham Lincoln, at least.

    Kind of. Except I couldn't make him too zombie-ish, because they had to be recognizable. Otherwise I would liked to have made them really disgusting. Then you can't tell it's Abraham Lincoln. I don't want to do that to Abraham Lincoln, anyway. He's a vampire hunter, from what I understand.

    Sure, there was that historical film that came out last year about it.

    I waited to see the Spielberg film, because I wanted to see the "Vampire Hunter" one, so that I could watch Spielberg's and put it in its proper perspective.

    You're likely focusing on "Shaolin Cowboy" right now, but is there anything else that you're working on that you want fans to know about?

    No, I just hope they'll read "Shaolin." It's action-packed. If you don't like action in comics, then you're not going to like this.
    Looking forward to the new series.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #25

    Geof Darrow’s Shaolin Cowboy #1

    Cover Art.


  11. #26

    SHAOLIN COWBOY Hard Cover Collection released.

    THE SHAOLIN COWBOY: SHEMP BUFFET

    Collects the complete Dark Horse Comics Shaolin Cowboy series!
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  12. #27
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    He's back

    JANUARY 05, 2017 9:00am PT by Graeme McMillan
    'Shaolin Cowboy' Returns to Comics This April (Exclusive)


    Courtesy of Geof Darrow/Dark Horse Comics

    Geof Darrow's beautiful comic about an ugly killing machine begins again with 'Who'll Stop the Reign?'
    It's been three years, but the world is finally ready for the return of the Shaolin Cowboy.

    Following the January 2014 conclusion of the critically acclaimed last series, Geof Darrow's comic book killing machine will return this spring in the brand-new four-issue series The Shaolin Cowboy: Who'll Stop The Reign? It will once again pair Darrow with Eisner Award-winning colorist Dave Stewart as the eponymous antihero continues his fight.

    Calling Who'll Stop The Reign? "a tale of revenge both petty and profound in origin," Darrow told THR that the new series might be a little more wordy than the [almost entirely silent] previous outing. "The last story didn't need much dialogue because the protagonist was just trying to survive and have him 'Deadpooling' while he was fighting to survive a zombie onslaught would have seemed even more ridiculous than the situations I created for him," he said. "This time he is up against enemies capable of thought, albeit just as mindless in their own way as the prior antagonists."

    Darrow, who's known for his beautifully precise and detailed line work, has previously worked with Frank Miller — who provides a variant cover for the series' first issue — and Moebius, as well as collaborating with the Wachowskis on designs for The Matrix and Speed Racer, among other projects.



    The Shaolin Cowboy: Who'll Stop The Reign? launches from Dark Horse Comics this April.
    Ha. Beat DS to this one.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Ha. Beat DS to this one.
    I'll still lend you my copy.

  14. #29

    The Shaolin Cowboy: Who’ll Stop the Reign? #2 (of 4)

    The Shaolin Cowboy hits town, and it hits back. With King Crab in hot pursuit, he runs straight into the not-so-kosher menace of HOG KONG and his twisted tale of ham-fisted revenge. High-cholesterol-fueled action served up hot with plenty of chasers!
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  15. #30
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    Lead Poisoning: The Pencil Art of Geof Darrow

    This looks good.

    How 'sad and childish' Trump inspired comics legend Geof Darrow: 'He just always annoyed the hell out of me'
    The artist tells EW about his new pencil art book, ‘Lead Poisoning,’ and reflects on his characters and inspirations
    CHRISTIAN HOLUB@CMHOLUB
    POSTED ON AUGUST 16, 2017 AT 11:55AM EDT


    DARK HORSE; JIM WATSON/GETTY IMAGES

    Most readers encounter the work of comic book artists at the finished stage — after the art has been penciled, inked, colored, lettered, and printed. Peeks behind the creative process are therefore always welcome, and Dark Horse’s new book Lead Poisoning: The Pencil Art of Geof Darrow offers a plethora of insights. Darrow is one of the most legendary creators in the industry — he’s a three-time Eisner Award winner — having spent decades producing jam-packed visual fantasies featuring cyborgs, cowboys, cyberpunk detectives, and everything in between. The new book offers a wide range of Darrow’s pencil art, from character sketches and convention doodles to drawings dating back to his childhood. Without ink or color, this pencil art fully shows off all the painstaking details Darrow’s art is known for, accompanied by quotes and analysis from fellow comic legends, including Mike Mignola, Sergio Aragones, Richard Corben, and more.


    DARK HORSE


    DARK HORSE


    DARK HORSE

    Certain images and recurring themes are evident in Lead Poisoning. The Shaolin Cowboy, the protagonist of a series of comics Darrow has written since 2005, appears in several, including one of him riding a gigantic turtle. “Riding” is a common motif in Darrow’s work; several Lead Poisoning drawings show smaller creatures riding on top of towering monsters or impossibly complex machines, while the villain in the latest Shaolin Cowboy miniseries is a crab that rides on top of people’s heads while controlling their movements. According to Darrow, this was inspired by a drawing by Ron Cobb, who did a lot of conceptual design for both Alien and Star Wars.

    “In Star Wars, the first one, there’s a shot of a stormtrooper riding on top of the lizard,” Darrow tells EW. “I think that was inspired by this drawing Cobb had done, of a guy riding on a giant lizard. I saw that in high school and was like, that’s the coolest thing ever!‘ I’m always trying to achieve that level of capability and drawing and making it look convincing. I also just like vehicles of all sorts.”

    Even when they’re not riding giant lizards or other fantastic vehicles, Darrow’s creations are often bursting with details. To offset this, Darrow often sets these characters against unremarkable backgrounds in order to play up the contrast.

    “I always think that if you draw something crazy, but if you make the background fairly realistic, whatever’s going on in front of it will seem even crazier because it’s grounded in reality,” Darrow says. “Like when Robert Altman built the set for Popeye, all the buildings are wood — browns and some greens. And then you had these characters that were super colorful and totally unreal, and they just popped because you had this background that contrasted.”


    DARK HORSE


    DARK HORSE

    The Shaolin Cowboy, in particular, drifts across any number of ordinary-looking backgrounds while dealing with otherworldly enemies. The 2013 miniseries Shaolin Cowboy: Shemp Buffet kicks off with the titular character fighting off an entire horde of zombies against a nondescript desert highway, and this year’s Shaolin Cowboy: Who’ll Stop the Reign? pits him against gigantic animals and the aforementioned mind-controlling crab in the middle of an average American city street.

    Mignola, a friend of Darrow’s who is quoted in Lead Poisoning, once told EW that Hellboy was “kind of my ‘everything’ book,” where “anything I want to do, I’m gonna do with this guy.” Darrow says Shaolin Cowboy fulfills a similar function for him: An avatar he can drop into any situation that interests him.

    “Mike and I actually talked about it. He’s an engine,” Darrow says of the character. “He’s a little bit like Clint Eastwood in those Man With No Name movies, and he just kind of shows up and things happen around him and he reacts to them. He’s not married into any kind of genre.”


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    The Shaolin Cowboy, therefore, encounters the things Darrow is thinking about — and like most people these days, Darrow says his thoughts often turn to President Trump. His name appears several times in the latest Shaolin Cowboy series, emblazoned over radioactive material, uttered by the mind-controlling crab’s swastika-tattooed followers, and always hovering in the background.

    “I actually did a lot of that Trump stuff way before he was elected,” Darrow says. “He just always annoyed the hell out of me. He seemed extremely pompous and narcissistic, and the more it went on, and the more he started winning, it just bothered me more and more. I thought it was kind of funny to put it in there.”

    He continues: “Maybe I have a disconnect — I’m not a religious person — but I can’t understand how anybody who says they are Christian could support that guy. You overlook so much stuff with that guy, I can’t wrap my head around it. I just don’t understand it. It saddens and mystifies me. His hatred of Obama – I think that he’s so f–ing intimidated by that guy. It’s making him crazy and just wants to erase any trace of that man from the face of the Earth. It’s just so sad and childish.”

    Lead Poisoning and Shaolin Cowboy: Who’ll Stop the Reign? are both available now from Dark Horse.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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