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Thread: SHAOLIN COWBOY (the comic)

  1. #31
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    ttt 4 2018!

    I've fallen behind on this...


    Shaolin Cowboy Interview
    by Andrew Whalen @AndWhalen
    01/10/18

    Geof Darrow creates with torrents of nouns. Known for Eisner Award-winning, hyper-detailed and dense comic book art, most of Darrow’s work overflows from a dizzying imagination: 50s-style diners swarming with rhesus monkeys, an iguana with a pistol-nose, a gorilla-thing with dinosaur skulls braided into its hair and a titanic, flying, vomiting Donald Trump in a diaper, held aloft by a Trump-branded jetpack that looks like a leaf blower crossed with a power substation (“It was before he was elected. And he just always bugged me,” Darrow told us). Matching his mastery of infinite tiny details is his willingness to play with them, creating chimeras like hermit crab cars and dogs with knives for paws.

    His recent collection of drawings, Lead Poisoning: The Pencil Art of Geof Darrow, features the pencil art before inking, including pages from his collaborations with Frank Miller, concept art from movies like the cancelled American remake of Akira and pages from his ongoing opus, The Shaolin Cowboy. After a run of issues — collected in The Shaolin Cowboy: Shemp Buffet — seeing the titular character armed with a double-long staff (tipped with chainsaws, of course), slicing through an endless horde of desert zombies, Darrow takes his avuncular martial arts master to the big city for The Shaolin Cowboy: Who Will Stop The Reign?

    The Shaolin Cowboy comics tell martial arts stories in Western settings, allowing Darrow to play on both sides of the thin line between Eastern and Western action themes. The aesthetic is predominantly Southwestern and choked with Americana, even if the action is Shaolin kung fu. Even the Shaolin Cowboy’s costume reveals just about everything about Darrow’s multilayered approach to comic art and storytelling. Darrow pulled the cowboy’s bib shirt right off John Wayne in The Searchers.

    “The colors are for two reasons,” Darrow said. “They’re the Superman colors — red, yellow and blue — and also the Chinese Superman: the Monkey King.” That’s three inspirations, each a zeitgeist-defining hero from a radically different source.

    Darrow’s conceptual multiplicity is met with an equally powerful whimsy, colliding the legendary and archetypal with the goofy and irreverent. “I just put tennis shoes on him because I thought it would be funny,” Darrow said. “ I wanted to give him a cowboy hat, but I thought it would be too stupid.”


    The Shaolin Cowboy teamed up with Clint Eastwood in Lead Poisoning: The Pencil Art of Geof Darrow.
    PHOTO: DARK HORSE COMICS INC.

    There are, of course, artistic influences Darrow would cite. He dedicates Who Will Stop the Reign? to his “ArtFather” Jean Giraud, better known as Moebius, a comic book artist who worked on Alien and Blade Runner. “That guy had more styles than Neiman Marcus had shoes,” Darrow said. “He was like a monster of drawing. He’d draw anything. Very lyrical. He was very, very nice to me.”

    But, just as often, Darrow synthesizes film and TV into the blood-soaked chaos filling his pages. In short succession he cited the films of Akira Kurosawa, Lau Kar-leung, Tsui Hark, Kenji Misumi, Hideo Gosha, Bruce Lee and Yuen Woo-ping as sources of inspiration.

    “The stuff that made these guys laugh, him and his crew, they would crack up when someone busted their ass. And they were always betting on ****,” Darrow said of Woo-ping, the legendary fight choreographer, who he met while creating concept art for The Matrix.

    As for the Shaolin Cowboy himself, he’s “a cross between Zatoichi and Stephen Chow.” Like Zatoichi, he is a modest wanderer hiding immense power. But unlike Zatoichi, the landscape the Cowboy roams is overloaded with talkative, flashy, silly characters, like Chow’s Shaolin Soccer or Kung Fu Hustle. That makes the Shaolin Cowboy an Asian cinema mash-up roughly equivalent to recasting Naked Gun with Jack Reacher instead of Leslie Nielsen.

    But what’s especially fascinating about the Shaolin Cowboy’s new adventure in Who Will Stop the Reign? is its heavy reliance on dialogue, with Darrow porting his artistic maximalism into his scriptwriting. In one encounter, the Cowboy fights a Buddhist version of the Grim Reaper, sent by the kings of hell to take his soul. There’s just one problem: hell’s warden doesn’t know the Shaolin Cowboy’s true name. Bring on the torrent of nouns. “Wang Zhengquan, Misumi, Kenji, Dragon Foot Wong, Liu Jiahui, Katsu Shintaro, Yue Sing Wai, Sacramento Yu, Shirato Sanpei, Kwan Tak Hing, Liu Chia-Liang,” the demon says. “Don Ho, Yuan Heping, Buddhist Palm and his Five Sisters Wu, Hung Kam-Bo, Siu Tin Yuen, Big Blade Wang, Wong Fei Hung…” and the list goes on, until he is defeated and cast back to hell.

    Just like his art, Darrow’s Shaolin Cowboy dialogue is stuffed with references, in this case a cavalcade of martial arts figures, including actors, directors, manga artists, choreographers and the legendary figures that inspired their movies. Yes, the Zatoichi actor, Shintaro Katsu, is named too.

    “A lot of times I don’t even remember what I wrote and I’d forgotten I’d done that,” Darrow said. “I just knew the guy had to rattle off a bunch of names before Shaolin Cowboy busted up his soul jet or essence and sent him back to hell.”

    It’s a huge contrast to the mostly silent Shaolin Cowboy in Shemp Buffet, who fights with only the chainsaw sound effects and occasional grunt cluttering the action. He described it as an intentional contrast with the “Marvel style, where Spider-Man is talking through a whole fight.”


    The Shaolin Cowboy vs. a horde of zombies in Shemp Buffet.
    PHOTO: DARK HORSE COMICS INC.

    “It’s all a fantasy, so I guess it doesn’t make sense to think it through all that much, but when you’re fighting these guys you’re not going to have time to be like ‘Here’s sand in your eyes, Sandman!’” he said. “I thought it would be funny for it just to be him.”

    His most common answer to questions regarding artistic inspiration is “I thought it would be funny,” so it’s no surprise Darrow described the voluminous dialogue as an exercise in defying expectation. “I thought for the next one they’re going to be waiting for me to do more of the same,” he said. “So I thought I’d put a little more.”

    Though his writing demonstrates all the same meticulous abundance as his art, Darrow hesitates to describe it as anything but utilitarian. “I always think of like Jack Kirby, where you have a plot and you just have to draw it and then you say ‘Oh, well, someone has to say this or that,” Darrow said. “I wrote a screenplay for The Shaolin Cowboy movie when I was in Japan. And that’s the first time I had to sit down and write a story out before I drew anything. You guys, you writers, it’s a lonely, lonely job. It drives me crazy. I can’t listen to music or have television on.”

    (The Shaolin Cowboy movie!? “Sitting in boxes in Japan, half-finished,” Darrow told me. Oh. The Weinstein Company was supposed to co-produce, but they pulled out. “His face is like a walking Picture of Dorian Gray,” Darrow said of Harvey, “every sin is carved into that ugly mug of his.”)

    Though Darrow is casually self-deprecating about his work, little moments of enthusiasm reveal the rigor behind it. “I can make stuff up, but if they’re based in reality, the craziness works more,” Darrow said.

    His mastery may come from overwhelming details, the kind of stuff that makes his comics endlessly re-readable, Darrow boils his objective down to something simple. It involves, a reference, of course, this time to Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure. “My favorite line is, he comes up at the end and there’s the prison bus and he comes up and goes ‘What do you think?’ and a prisoner goes ‘Action Packed!’” Darrow said. “That’s my goal. Make it action packed for Pee-Wee.”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  2. #32
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    Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek

    EXCLUSIVE: DARK HORSE TO RE-RELEASE GEOF DARROW'S ORIGINAL SHAOLIN COWBOY SERIES
    Contributed by Mike Avila
    @MikeAvila
    Feb 2, 2018



    You'll soon be able to get your hands on one of the 21st century's most acclaimed and hard-to-find comic book series, as SYFY WIRE can exclusively reveal that Geof Darrow's classic seven-issue series that introduced the Shaolin Cowboy is finally being reprinted.

    Dark Horse Comics is reprinting all seven issues of Shaolin Cowboy in a brand-new hardcover collection set for release on July 11. Titled Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek, it marks the first-ever hardcover edition for the legendary series, which was originally published by Burleyman Entertainment beginning in 2004.

    This new collection features a brand-new cover drawn by Darrow and colored by Dave Stewart, which you can see below. The original series won Darrow the Eisner Award for Best Writer/Artist in 2006. Darrow scripted and drew all seven issues, with color work by Pete Doherty, Alex Wald, and Lovern Kindzierski. In addition to those original issues, the new collection will include Shaolin Cowboy renditions by such noted artists as Moebius, Richard Delgado, Mike Mignola, Kevin Nowland, and John Severin.



    Shaolin Cowboy has earned a devoted following due to the series' sprawling and almost-impossible-to-describe fight sequences, as well as Darrow's inimitable attention to detail with his pencils. That devotion from fans is particularly noteworthy because of the patience they show; Darrow often takes years in between releasing new adventures of the former monk.

    As he told SYFY WIRE last year in an extensive interview, he's not the fastest draw in the West, because he prefers to take the extra time to make what he's working on extra special. We think it's fair to say that releases like Shemp Buffet and last year's Who'll Stop the Reign? have been worth the wait for those who enjoy gloriously bloody and often blurb-free fisticuffs and mayhem.

    Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek from Dark Horse Comics hits comics shops on July 11 and arrives in bookstores July 17.
    That's a funny subtitle.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #33
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    dubious tale. fake news?

    Despite the 4/19/2009 date of this article, it shows on Bing as being posted 17d ago. And the Variety article it links to has evaporated. Nevertheless, we can hope.

    Geoff Darrow Writing and Directing Shaolin Cowboy Movie
    Posted on Wednesday, April 29th, 2009 by Brendon Connelly



    Excuse me for never having read Geoff Darrow‘s Shaolin Cowboy comics but I know some of his other work, most initmately his illustrations for Frank Miller’s ultra violent Hard Boiled, and I’ve heard of both Shaolin monks and Cowboys. Oh… and I also know that, according to Variety, the comic is being adapted into an animated feature by Darrow himself.

    They note that the producers on the film are to include the Wachowskis. No surprises there as Darrow has not only inspired them indirectly before (see The Matrix) he’s also collaborated explicitly with them too (see… er… The Matrix, for which Darrow contributed concept art).

    Indeed, the original Shaolin Cowboy comics are published by BurlyMan Entertainment, a company seeded by the Wachowskis and named with the fake, in-production title they used for the Matrix sequels.

    Darrow has an intensely detailed style, facilitated by him creating the artwork at a greatly increased scale than in the eventually published issues. I can almost imagine this film being shot in the IMAX format, but even if it does end up being originated on 35mm film or HD video, as I’d expect, it will most likely benefit from being watched on a very large, very high quality screen, and probably many times over.

    The premise of Shaolin Cowboy can be summed up simply – a Shaolin monk becomes a Cowboy – but the specifics fall way outside of such a predictable, simple logline. For example, the second lead character is apparently a talking mule called Lord Evelyn Dunkirk Winniferd Esq. the Third. I’m told that there’s also a city on the back of a lizard, a martial arts fighting crab with nazi insignia plastered on it, chainsaw fighting with sharks and other things that, frankly, would make an incredibly hard sell to a mainstream cinema audience – as if that really matters one jot. All the same, I hope there’s more to this than simply a string of outrageous and absurd whims.

    The comic was in the works for three years before Burlyman started publishing it but requires pages so detail-sodden that Darrow is already taking a full year to get issues wrapped. Who knows how difficult it is going to prove creating a moving version of this thing? Good luck to all in their wild ambition.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #34
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    The Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek

    The hard-to-find first arc of The Shaolin Cowboy is back!
    It’s comics legend Geof Darrow’s gift to his fans as he prepares to leave Chicago for France.
    By Mark Peters @wordlust


    GEOF DARROW

    The Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek
    By Geof Darrow (Dark Horse)

    A massive lizard carries a city on its back. A paunchy adventurer fashions two chainsaws and a kendo stick into a two-pronged zombie-slaughtering weapon. A monster pig with ninja skills seeks revenge for the consumption of his family.

    These are just some of the outsize images typical of the art of comic book creator Geof Darrow, who's best known for his intricately designed scenes of mad machinery and inventive mayhem. His 13-year stint as a Chicago resident will be ending soon as he departs for France (exact location to be determined), but he'll be leaving behind his art, including a long-awaited reprint of the hard-to-find first arc of his signature work: The Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek.

    Originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Darrow, now 62, first came to Chicago when he enrolled at the now-defunct Chicago Academy of Fine Arts in 1972. Since graduating, he's bounced around between Chicago, Los Angeles, France, and, occasionally, Japan. His career has been similarly diverse, shifting from the grunt work of Hanna-Barbera animation to doing conceptual design for the Matrix films and other Hollywood fare. But his friendship and collaboration with French artist and comics legend Moebius beginning in the early 1980s inspired him to pursue his true medium: the comic book. While hard-core fans may have picked up his collaborations with Moebius and stories about Bourbon Thret—a precursor to the Shaolin Cowboy—Darrow first gained attention in America in 1990 with Hard Boiled, an Eisner-winning collaboration with writer Frank Miller, with whom he would later cocreate Big Guy and Rusty the Boy Robot.

    Then there's The Shaolin Cowboy, originally published by now-defunct Burlyman Press in 2005. The titular character is a schlubby blend of Shaolin monk and Robert Mitchum acolyte who can't seem to avoid trouble, whether in the form of dopey rednecks or evil King Crab, and the series is equally action comic and idiosyncratic experiment. For example, in the second arc, Shemp Buffet, the Shaolin Cowboy fights zombies. What could be more mainstream than that? But he fights those zombies in a wordless, sprawling, 100-plus-page gore fest in which every body part, blood spurt, chainsaw slice, ill-advised tattoo, and zombie cat is rendered with the exacting line work that is Darrow's trademark.

    Such scenes exude a gleeful intricacy and lust for detail that set Darrow apart from other comics artists.

    "Everything matters," he says. "It matters to me. I draw all that stuff because it adds content, and it makes it very particular. Each one of those drawings, each one of those streets: they're not generic. . . . I try to make everything its own creation so it doesn't get boring. It adds character to the drawing."

    While you can't talk about Darrow without obsessing over his obsession with details, there's much more to his craft. As Mike Mignola, creator of Hellboy, writes in an e-mail, "Sure, he puts every little nut and bolt and spinning wheel into every piece of machinery, but just look at how well drawn his people are. And his animals. And everything else. Cramming a drawing full of stuff is one thing, but his locations feel real, his living things have real personality. No matter how crazy his action is, things bend and move naturalistically. He is all-around an amazing artist."

    Darrow's experiences and interests don't entirely account for his maximalist style, but they explain it a little. His inspirations include samurai classics such as Yojimbo (1961), directed by Akira Kurosawa and starring Toshiro Mifune.

    "I think Yojimbo just took the top of my head off when I saw it. I still think that's the archetype for most loner heroes," said Darrow. "I can watch that thing over and over: it is so amazing. Because it's a comedy as well. And yet, it's horrible. I can't think of any movie that sets up what's coming more than the beginning of that movie, when Mifune walks into town and the dog runs out of the alley carrying a human hand in its mouth." Darrow fans will recognize that exact image popping up in his art from time to time as a hat tip to the inspiring film.

    On a more mechanical level, Darrow's time as an animator for Hanna-Barbera was instructive, if not fun.

    "In animation, you have to draw things in perspective," said Darrow. "Because you have to turn whatever it is around, whether it's a car or a person. At the time, mostly what I did was cars and trucks and boats and telephones, whatever objects they needed. It was a real eye-opening experience." Another benefit of that experience was getting to know one of his artistic heroes, Jack Kirby, creator or cocreator of many superheroes including Captain America, the X-Men, and the New Gods.

    Darrow's dense scenes also have great depth, which is informed by his "artfather" Moebius and filmmakers such as Anthony Mann, director of many Jimmy Stewart westerns, a genre close to Darrow's heart.

    "[Mann's] film compositions had a foreground, a middle ground, and a background, and an incredible amount of depth," Darrow says. "I always tried to get that kind of depth into what I do, because I think that's really interesting."

    But Darrow's depth is far weirder than Mann's. A memorable two-page spread from The Shaolin Cowboy: Who'll Stop the Reign? features a ninja pig flying through the air, squealing and sweating and bent on vengeance, while all manner of people and dogs and other animals go about their business; the background is filled with graffiti, discarded cans, cigarette butts, and dog crap. Darrow's frequent inclusion of dogs is influenced by his time in France, where he says "dogs are king," but contrast is king in Darrow World.

    "I love the idea of drawing crazy things in the foreground and then in the background being semi-realistic," said Darrow. "Or at least I attempt to draw realistically. And it makes the crazy stuff seem even crazier because you can identify with the background."

    Ever the perfectionist, Darrow says he hoped that flying giant ninja pig fit into the composition in proper perspective. He adds sheepishly, "I'm interested in really dumb things."
    Any more word on that movie?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #35
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    coming in paperback

    HEAT VISION
    Dark Horse Comics to Launch 'Shaolin Cowboy' Paperback
    AUGUST 31, 2020 9:00AM
    by Graeme McMillan



    Geof Darrow/Dark Horse Comics

    The Geof Darrow series, originally published by the Wachowskis, will be collected in its entirety from April through June next year.
    Next year, Lord Evelyn Dunkirk Winniferd Esq. the Third will finally get his day in the sun — alongside his human companion, the unnamed and silent Shaolin monk who accompanies him and can’t quite help but get himself into trouble. Dark Horse Comics is launching a new publishing program collecting Geof Darrow’s acclaimed Shaolin Cowboy series in its entirety in paperback for the first time.

    Shaolin Cowboy initially launched in 2004 from Burlyman Entertainment, the short-lived comic book company created by the Wachowskis, with Lana and Lilly contributing opening dialogue to the first issue — the only material in the entire run not written by creator Darrow. (Darrow illustrates the entire series.) In 2013, after a publication delay of a number of years, Dark Horse Comics took over publishing, relaunching and renumbering the title.

    The series has won the Inkpot Award, and been nominated for multiple Eisner Awards; Darrow himself is known for his design work with the Wachowskis on The Matrix and Speed Racer, as well as comic book collaborations with Frank Miller and Andrew Vachss.

    The new collected editions, which will be released on a monthly basis following an April 2021 launch, will be the first time the series has been collected in English-language paperback editions. All three books will feature all-new covers by Darrow, colored by Eisner Award-winning colorist Dave Stewart, making their debut below.


    Geof Darrow/Dark Horse Comics


    Geof Darrow/Dark Horse Comics


    Geof Darrow/Dark Horse Comics

    Shaolin Cowboy: Shemp Buffer will be released April 20, 2021, with Shaolin Cowboy: Who Will Stop The Reign following May 18, 2021. The series will conclude with Shaolin Cowboy: Start Trek, schedule for a June 22, 2021 release. All three volumes are prices for $19.99.


    The Hollywood Reporter
    GRAEME MCMILLAN
    graemeamcmillan@gmail.com
    Good to see this come around again.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #36
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    Cruel to be Kin

    Shaolin Cowboy Homeschools During a Pandemic In Geof Darrow's New Series
    Shaolin Cowboy is back in an all-new series from Geof Darrow as fans have never seen him before as the action hero homeschools during a pandemic

    BY SPENCER CONNOLLY
    PUBLISHED 7 DAYS AGO


    As Dark Horse Comics returns fans to the world of Shaolin Cowboy, the titular hero will be homeschooling a child during a pandemic in Geof Darrow’s new series. While the last issue of the original Shaolin Cowboy series was released in 2007 with the series’ seventh issue, the book has continued since then with a number of crossover books and offshoot storylines with one example being The Shaolin Cowboy: Shemp Buffet in which the hero fights a horde of zombies from The Walking Dead. Now, the Shaolin Cowboy is back in action as fans have never seen him before, as the world’s most brutal teacher.

    Shaolin Cowboy: Cruel to be Kin will be helmed by the award-winning creator, writer, and artist of the original series Geof Darrow as well as the Eisner-award-winning colorist Dave Stewart. The new book will be a seven-part limited series with a number of renowned comic book artists using their creative talents to provide variant covers for every issue of the series. The variant covers for the first issue will be done by Mike Mignola and Alice Darrow with Frank Quitely and Ed Piskor doing the artwork for the second issue’s variants. The third issue will have variants from Stan Sakai and Steve Skroce and the fourth issue will have variants from Duncan Fegredo and Jim Rugg. The final three issues will have variants done by Katsuya Terada, James Harren, and Tsui Hark.

    In a release by Dark Horse Comics announcing the new series, fans are given a sneak peek into the continuation of the epic world of the Shaolin Cowboy. This new installment has been self-identified as Phase Four of the SCU (Shaolin Cowboy Universe), where the Shaolin Cowboy puts his parenting skills to the test when he is forced to homeschool during a pandemic. However, this pandemic isn’t caused by a deadly virus but by an incredible influx of ultra-violence in a story that is described as being, “torn from yesterday’s viral twitter feeds”. These plot points are assured jabs at the sociological landscape of the world today that will be told the way only the Shaolin Cowboy can tell it.



    Geof Darrow has been described as one of the most influential cartoonists working today, and Darrow’s partner-in-comics behind this latest chapter in the Shaolin Cowboy saga, Dave Stewart, is just as revered. Darrow's designs have transcended the comic book medium and have influenced big-budget films including Speed Racer and The Matrix. In fact, Darrow's work on The Matrix isn’t the Shaolin Cowboy’s only tie to the Wachowskis. The Wachowski siblings became famous after bringing The Matrix saga to fans all over the world, and they even lent their creative talents to the original run of Shaolin Cowboy. The Wachowskis wrote the opening dialogue for the original series, being the only other writers credited on that series beyond the mastermind behind the whole comic, Geof Darrow.

    For years, the creative team of Geoff Darrow and Dave Stewart has brought the epic world of the Shaolin Cowboy to life from the original series to the crazy crossovers that were to follow. Now, a whole new story is about to hit the shelves and fans of the butt-kicking action hero will assuredly not be disappointed. Dark Horse Comics’ new comic Shaolin Cowboy: Cruel to be Kin #1 will be available May 18, 2022.
    The SCU - luv it!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #37

    Talking The Shaolin Cowboy with Geof Darrow

    The secret cross-over between The Shaolin Cowboy & Kung Fu Tai Chi.


  8. #38

    On Tiger Talk today!



    I had the unique opportunity to interviewed the legendary comic artist Geof Darrow, mastermind behind the extraordinary comic book: The Shaolin Cowboy and concept artist behind such films as The Matrix.

    Part 1 of our formal written interview appears on KungFuMagazine.com tomorrow June 22, 2022: there, we discussed THE MATRIX, Jet Li, and pioneering martial arts themed comic books. But over the course of that interview we also had some informal conversations about early influences, favorite Kung Fu movies as well as some real-life martial arts heroes (and villains?)...

    Check it out

  9. #39
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    Our latest exclusive interview.

    Man, you come right out of a comic book. READ Shaolin Cowboy, the Matrix & Kung Fu Movies with Geof Darrow Part 1 by Patrick Lugo

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #40

    TIGER TALK with Geof Darrow: talking concept art, Ridley Scott and Tsui Hark!




    In part two of our free-wheeling conversation with Eisner Award winning Comic Artist/Concept Artist Geof Darrow we discuss illustration and work with movie directors. Geof highlights some the pros and cons of his illustration work still done 100% on paper. Early experiences working with Moebius and film directors like Ridley Scott and Tsui Hark.

  11. #41
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    Our exclusive interview continues...

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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