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Thread: Martial Arts Museum

  1. #1
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    Royal Dragon E-mail - Martial arts museum?

    Hello I am Joseph Saladino owner of the world renown LawEnforcement.com I am a fellow martial artist on Long Island, New York and a representative of the Martial Arts History Museum.

    This will be the first brick and mortar Museum located in Los Angeles California with a grand opening scheduled for 2006. I have visited your website and I am asking for you to please kindly assist us all in making this Museum a reality for our future generations to come.

    1) Are you interested in signing up as a Museum member for $50. The Museum is a not for profit organization and your donation and membership is tax deductible. You will receive a variety of benefits to include a lovely t-shirt with the Museum logo on it and Museum Identification. We will also list your name or martial arts school on the Museum website at: http://www.martialartsmuseum.com/Mem...eummembers.htm for the entire world to see. I personally donated to the Museum not for the benefits in return but to support the mission. If you don't wish to donate at this time can you please

    2) If possible can you add the museum banner logo above to your website and please link it to: http://www.martialartsmuseum.com ?

    If you can kindly reply to this email with your interests it would be greatly appreciated. I would love to see that you support the perspective Museum and that you are included in the Museum so that our future generations remember all of the hard work and dedication that you and others as well as I have put forth.

    Can I please have your support for the Museum?

    Very Truly Yours,

    Joseph Saladino

    LawEnforcement.com


    Martial Arts History Museum plans For 2006 Grand Opening
    In 1999, the Martial Arts History Museum project began. First, an official Martial Arts Hall of Fame was created to launch the museum. The museum was a brainchild of kung fu pioneer Michael Matsuda.
    "I felt that we were losing our history, our traditions. I felt that the martial arts, which in some cases are thousands of years old, should have a museum to keep our history alive," notes Matsuda. "In the last 50 years, the martial arts has made a dramatic impact on America and the world. Many of these pioneers are still alive, but all will be forgotten if we don't do something to preserve our history."
    Our goal is to create and launch the museum in 2006. We are working closely with the City of Los Angeles to secure a location on Wilshire Blvd., on Museum Row and this looks like its going to happen.
    The Martial Arts History Museum is not a "who's who of the martial arts" but it is an accurate accounting of the history of the martial arts and those pioneers who have contributed to the spread of the arts. It will have tons of artifacts including uniforms, weapons, shields, championship belts, trophies, hitting pads, Chinese dragons, drums, utensils, mats, all that is involved in the martial arts. It will also have a variety of section on martial arts in the media, films, cartoons, etc. In addition, the museum will have a variety of exhibit every few months focusing on kickboxing, Ed Parker's system, the UFC, the tournament champions, etc.
    "The goal of the museum is to focus on the history, but have enough exhibits to include everything about the martial arts so nearly everyone has their artifacts in the museum at one time or another," adds Matsuda.
    One of the main areas is the official Martial Arts Hall of Fame. This will be a huge wall to will be updated each year. The nominees and inductees are selected by the Hall of Famers themselves in a huge voting process.
    Each year, the museum holds the Hall of Fame Ceremony in Los Angeles as 10 new individuals are inducted into the official Hall of Fame.
    The Martial Arts History Museum is a non-profit organization and all donations and Museum Memberships are tax-deductible.
    We ask for your support in creating the museum by making a donation.


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  2. #2
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    Is Michael Matsuda one of the phoney TSPK monkey guys, or am I thinking of someone else? Anyway, I think a martial arts museum would be cool, but before giving money or support I'd wait to see if it's going to be legit or just another venue for a small group of people to scratch themselves on the back like some other martial arts hall of fames out there

  3. #3

    Martial Arts Museum


  4. #4
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    I think it looks cool at first, but being headed by a fake monkey kungfu guy isn't going to help the thing take off. I get the feeling it's going to end up like the other "hall of fame" things out there where a small group of people will take if very seriously, and most others will think it's bs political crap. I imagine they'll get some cool exhibits worth checking out though.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brad
    I think it looks cool at first, but being headed by a fake monkey kungfu guy isn't going to help the thing take off. I get the feeling it's going to end up like the other "hall of fame" things out there where a small group of people will take if very seriously, and most others will think it's bs political crap. I imagine they'll get some cool exhibits worth checking out though.

    why is he a fake monkey kungfu guy?
    _______________
    I'd tell you to go to hell, but I work there and don't want to see you everyday.

  6. #6
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    spank fake monkeys

    We're actually doing some coop work with them - see member benefits
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #7
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    It's a good idea but they have to invest in higher-quality awards ... those statues look like something you pick up on Canal St. for $5.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing
    We're actually doing some coop work with them - see member benefits
    That's cool, they put Gene's picture on the membership card.
    I quit after getting my first black belt because the school I was a part of was in the process of lowering their standards A painfully honest KC Elbows

    The crap that many schools do is not the crap I was taught or train in or teach.

    Dam nit... it made sense when it was running through my head.

    DM


    People love Iron Crotch. They can't get enough Iron Crotch. We all ride the Iron Crotch for the exposure. Gene

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  9. #9
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    why is he a fake monkey kungfu guy?
    He does the Paulie Zink money style. Lookup the Paulie Zink threads.

  10. #10
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    Martial Arts Museum closes

    Did anyone here ever visit it?
    Newhall Martial Arts Museum Closes
    Curator i seeking location outside Santa Clarita Valley.
    By Karen Elowitt
    Signal Staff Writer
    Wednesday February 13, 2008

    After only eight months at its Newhall location, the Martial Arts Museum has shuts its doors while curator Michael Matsuda mulls over alternate locations outside the Santa Clarita Valley.

    Citing dwindling funds and a misunderstanding over funding with the city of Santa Clarita, Matsuda closed the museum on January 31 but plans to reopen nearer to downtown Los Angeles later this year.

    Though the City Council and other city officials welcomed him with open arms, Matsuda is disappointed that expected funds never panned out.

    “We met with (City Manager) Ken Pulskamp, and he asked what we needed,” Matsuda said. “I said we needed about $40,000 in startup funds to tide us over until other funding came through. That was the end of the conversation.” He added that Pulskamp, Bob Kellar, and Laurene Weste were three of the many city officials who initially encouraged Matsuda to locate the museum in the Santa Clarita Valley.

    However, two weeks later Matsuda said that he got a call from the city’s planning and economic development manager Paul Brotzman saying that no funds for the museum were available, and that was the end of it. Instead of the $40,000 he needed, he got the cold shoulder.

    “City officials didn’t return calls or even seem to care,” he lamented. “They should have had the courtesy to at least meet with us.

    “I don’t want to make it seem that funds were promised,” Matsuda clarified. “But Pulskamp gave us the impression funds were available. That’s why we opened in Newhall.”

    City spokeswoman Gail Ortiz said she was unaware of any promised funding, but she emphasized that the city will be sad to see the museum go.

    “We are disappointed to see Mr. Matsuda make the decision to leave Santa Clarita,” Ortiz said. “We did a lot of things to help him open in the last six months. We talked about locations, went on site tours, made introductions, and put him in touch with the place he is currently located.”

    Ortiz added that the City Council does not ordinarily give money to cultural groups such as the museum, but it does encourage them to apply for community grants.

    Matsuda did in fact apply for such a grant a few months ago, but withdrew his application recently when he made the decision to relocate.

    He said the museum, which is a 501C3 nonprofit corporation, has been operating on reserve funds while waiting for private grant funds to materialize. Matsuda explained that these funds are already in the pipeline, but it can sometimes take six months to get approval. Not wanting to deplete his reserves while waiting, he instead decided to close up shop.

    Matsuda feels that the loss of the museum in the Newhall location will be a loss for the cause of culture and diversity in the Santa Clarita Valley, and a loss for the downtown area.

    “The city wanted something to attract new business,” Matsuda said. “During my many talks with the city they kept stressing their goal of finding new ways to attract visitors to Newhall and that’s exactly what we did.”

    Many of the museum’s visitors were school children from local schools, but Matsuda said he had also had visitors from as far afield as Australia, England, and Italy.

    “Our goal was to enlighten our kids on how Asian history became part of American history through Asian martial arts,” he said. “One way to break down barriers and combat prejudice is to introduce young people to the traditions of different cultures.”

    Though the museum’s physical location is currently closed, the business is still a concern and the 450 or so dues-paying members will not be forgotten.

    “Hopefully we’ll move into a new place around April or May,” Matsuda said.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #11
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    ****,as a museum curator I would LOVE to curate a martial arts museum

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up Martial arts histroy museum

    I am proud to announce the Martail Arts History Museum plans to reopen in February 2011 at it's new permanent location in Burbank.

    The Museum was founded in 1999 by Michael Matsuda. It became a traveling exhib touring various locations from New Jersey to Las Vegas. In 2007 it opened in a tempoary location in Santa Clarita, Ca and had it sights set on Burbank.

    The museum is designed as a time line beginning at the Shaolin Temple and shows how martial Arts came to the USA, and how is has developed here in America, it even plays a role in movies and the MMA.

    It's not a who's who of Martial Arts its a Asian cultural and education facility.

    Lots of interresting information can be found their, you just might run into James Cagney or Billy Jack.

    it is operated by some fine people.

    check it out

    www.MAmuseum,com
    Last edited by SIFU RON; 11-12-2010 at 12:23 AM.
    Visit the past in order to discover something new.

    [url]http://wahquekungfu.proboards100.com

  13. #13
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    Now in Santa Clarita

    That's the hometown of Black Belt magazine.
    Wednesday, 23 February 2011
    MARTIAL ARTS HISTORY MUSEUM TO OPEN IN BURBANK, CA
    /UCWE/ - BURBANK, CA - The Martial Arts History Museum, the first museum in the world featuring all aspects of Asian martial arts and Asian culture, is pleased to announce its relocation from Santa Clarita, CA to the city of Burbank. The main purpose of the Martial Arts History Museum is to provide educational information to children and visitors about the cultural, historical and artistry of Asian forms of martial arts. Founded in 1999, the Museum is set to open its doors in April, 2011. "We are proud to join the city of Burbank which is synonymous throughout the world for entertainment," said Museum founder and President Michael Matsuda.

    Located in the heart of the city near Magnolia and Buena Vista, the Martial Arts Museum brings with it a huge customer and fan following. The Martial Arts History Museum, a non-profit organization, is filled with over 500 artifacts including iconic outfits, tournament costumes, movie wardrobe and historical photographs. The path through the Museum is set up as a timeline revealing how the martial arts first began, which Asian countries played a role in its development, the traditions behind the art and how it took its first step on Western soil. "Our mission is honor Asian history and its roots in American history," said Matsuda. "For example, Asian kung fu and karate have had positive influences on movies, television shows and animation."

    The world renowned Museum features an evolving venue of artifacts and collections of Asian martial arts, which enables visitors and members to experience new exhibits on a continual and rotating basis. In addition, one of the popular offerings of the Martial Arts History Museum is the plethora of seminars and events featuring all aspects of Asian heritage and culture. For example, the lineup of upcoming events include a sushi seminar by Chef Maru Baba, stunt fighting seminars, action film director series, how to break into stunts, samurai sword authentication, samurai sword cutting, Chinese lion dancing, Asian language classes, anime workshops, Asian film festivals, and movie premieres, to name just a few.

    "We are also planning a host of ‘meet and greet events’ of MMA stars, martial arts celebrities, ask the action actor series and more," said Matsuda. "There are many stars that have utilized martial arts in their career in various hit movies and have been very supportive to the Museum." The Martial Arts Museum events are so unique and informative that they have drawn visitors from San Diego to San Luis Obispo.

    "Our first event for our new Burbank location is a seminar sampler in which the public will be provided free entrance into the facility and get a 15-minute taste of the seminars yet to come," concludes Matsuda.

    Entrance into the Museum is $6, however, memberships are encouraged which provide free visitation to all its seminars for a full year. For more information on upcoming events and to join the VIP MA Museum Mobile Club, text mamuseum to 69852.The Museum is located at 2319 West Magnolia Blvd., and their website is MAmuseum.com. Tax deductible donations are always appreciated and welcome.

    Contact info for Press only

    Michael Matsuda
    818 355-1109
    www.martialartsmuseum.com
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #14
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    Over 500 items eh?

    6$ eh?

    Hmmmn.

    Lemme think about it.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  15. #15
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    Now open

    Ron - did you go?
    Martial arts fans get their kicks at new history museum in Burbank
    By C.J. Lin, Staff Writer
    Posted: 06/26/2011 11:11:54 AM PDT
    Updated: 06/26/2011 09:21:39 PM PDT

    BURBANK - Billed as the first of its kind in the world, the Martial Arts History Museum reopened in its permanent home in Burbank on Saturday amid a flurry of martial arts celebrities and fans itching to get a glimpse of more than 300 artifacts.

    The grand opening boasted 12th century Samurai armor replicas donated from Japan, colorful magazine covers, a variety of weapons, movie props and a time line of martial arts films dating back to the 1920s.

    It's not just all about Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, Jet Li or Jackie Chan, according to Michael Matsuda, owner and founder of the museum, which left Santa Clarita in 2008.

    "It's not a who's who, even though there are obviously key figures that you need to put up to represent the history of martial arts," said Matsuda, a 10th-degree black belt in Monkey Kung Fu. "These people are a part of Asian culture and show how it connects and is a part of American history as well. It's a blending of the two."

    Asian martial arts first appeared on film in the 1921 movie "The Outside Woman," and continued with Japan's "The Seven Samurai," and the original "Green Hornet" TV show, according to the time line, one of the more popular exhibits at the 3,500-square-foot museum.

    Later came 1971's "Billy Jack," which kicked off the Kung Fu craze of that decade, including the rise of David Carradine in his "Kung Fu" television series and Bruce Lee and Chuck Norris in "Way of the Dragon."

    Those movies paved the way for "The Karate Kid," "Big Trouble in Little China," "Xena," and more recently, the "Kill Bill" movies and "Kung Fu Panda."

    Displayed below the time line were props used in several popular movies, including the Karate Kid's Japanese sun-emblazoned headband, the medallion worn by Jackie Chan in "The Medallion" and the costume worn by Cynthia Rothrock - the female equivalent of Chuck Norris in the martial arts world - in "Sci-Fighter."

    The idea behind the fighting icons, costumes and weapons is to give people a chance to learn about Asian cultures and the hundreds of fighting styles that have sprung from it, such as Japan's Judo, Korea's Hapkido, and Thailand's Muay Thai.

    "This will give a glimpse into how deep the history is and how deep the influences are in today's movies," said Douglas Wong, a Northridge-based martial arts instructor who trained Lucy Lawless for "Xena," Kevin Sorbo for "Hercules," and Carradine. "It's part of Chinese history. You can't talk about Chinese history without martial arts."

    And it's a chance for people to learn about the martial arts greats, said Rothrock, a five-time World Karate Champion who holds six black belts in various fighting styles.

    "This will keep their memory forever," said Rothrock, who posed for pictures with fans beside her costume. "I think the history gets a little bit lost in martial arts. People don't really know the ancestors. If it wasn't for them, we wouldn't be where we are today. They taught all of us. They were our inspiration."

    Prince Albert Jackson, a martial arts fan from Sherman Oaks, was beside himself. He recalled watching many of the movies listed on the time line growing up in Bermuda.

    "It's fantastic," said Jackson, who said he would return as the museum displays new artifacts. "I'm glad something like this exists."

    For more information, visit http://mamuseum.com or call 818-478-1722.
    If you go
    What: Martial Arts History Museum
    Where: 2319 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank
    Tickets: $6 for adults, $3 for children ages 6 to 12, and free for children under 6
    Hours: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday to Sunday,
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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