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Thread: Kung-Fu Music

  1. #16
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    How could I forget these guys?

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  2. #17
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    Was this post made for this thread or what?

    Now here's an act that sounds genuinely relevant.
    Only God knows what to do with Voodoo Kungfu
    * [00:50 December 15 2009]

    By Robert Powers

    Mixing elements of traditional Mongolian and Tibetan music with bone-crushingly loud and intensely grooving metal riffs, Voodoo Kungfu is a innovative, made-in-China musical act that has been a mainstay of Beijing's metal scene for nearly a decade.

    Front man Li Nan, the band's sole remaining founding member, cuts a beastly figure for his height, and is known for growling, chanting and operatically singing his way through the band's charged live sets.

    This past Friday at Mao Live, Voodoo Kungfu performed alongside a traditional folk orchestra, pitting their drummer against a Chinese lion drum, their guitarist against a matouqin ("horse-head fiddle") and Li Nan himself versus a throat singer.

    Following a performance by local hardcore outfit Lose Control of Logic, stagehands went to work converting the club into a faux abattoir, hanging white bed sheets splattered with red paint on the walls.

    With a banner reading, Only God Can Judge Me, the name of their latest album, draped across the back of the stage, the seven-member traditional-folk meets modern-metal ensemble's tore into their first song of the night: a hauntingly atmospheric mini-epic, which contained a repeating vocal line in Chinese, "Carry forth, develop and advance." [发扬光大]

    The band's metal cover of Bob Marley's "Get Up, Stand Up" stood out as an evening highlight.

    The next morning, the band departed by train for a follow-up gig at rock club Riff Live in Tianjin.

    They had been told months in advance that the club would be providing the lion drum and gong required for their Saturday show. But upon arriving in Tianjin, they were told that neither was available, according to Nico Mazzei, Voodoo Kungfu's bass player. And at the last minute, a band member had to return to Beijing to bring replacements on an express train.

    This incident, coupled with the club's apathy towards advertising the show (resulting in a less-than-promised turnout) and sound engineer problems, led band leader Li Nan to express himself in a way not commonly seen at live rock shows in China.

    "Li Nan destroyed the stage," said Mazzei.

    Near the end of their closing song, Li Nan became a bull in a China shop.

    He upturned the 80-kilogram lion drum ("That thing takes three people to carry," said Mazzei), pushed Mazzei and the gong player over nearby amps and then dove, head first, into the drum set.

    Accomplished matouqin player Jing Shan, hired for both Beijing and Tianjin shows, grabbed his classical instrument and fled the stage.

    "Down on the floor, everyone thought the show was niubi," said a Swedish concertgoer, who saw the shows in Beijing and Tianjin. "But I've never seen anything so insane. It was like a hurricane had gone through. People started backing off when he was wrecking the stage, but when he jumped into the audience, the bar staff shouted 'everyone out!'"

    "No one wanted to go back inside," she added, "but I went back in and saw Li Nan kneeling in front of the stage like Jesus."

    "I'm not an angry guy," said Li Nan, who infamously smashed a Buddha statue on stage during 2007's Midi Festival. "I was just enjoying the music too much. It's a rock show, Jimi Hendrix smashed a guitar, Nirvana did the same thing."

    The band's performs again at Mao Live on December 26. Though God only knows what will be in store for that show.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #18
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    Shaolin Death Squad

    A 5DV tribute album. How amusing.
    SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD Featuring KING DIAMOND Drummer: New Album Out Now - Jan. 12, 2010
    SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD, the Texas-based experimental rock/metal group featuring KING DIAMOND drummer Matt Thompson, has released its long-awaited second full-length album, entitled "Five Deadly Venoms", via Do For It Records. The CD is loaded with 11 tracks and includes a five-song cycle inspired by the cult martial arts film of the same name, "Five Deadly Venoms", directed by Chang Cheh.

    Commented guitarist David O'Hearn: "It's been a long writing and recording process, but those who enjoy SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD are a special breed — tenacious and dedicated — and we really think they will enjoy this latest offering. We really believe that this latest collection will be everything that has become expected of us. We're more focused and better rehearsed than ever simply because we've found a voice that we all agree is SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD."

    Drums, mixing and mastering were done by Grammy Award winner Eric Delegard of Reel Time Audio. All guitars, bass, vocals and keys were recorded at Do For It Records Studio in Denton, Texas.

    Selected songs are posted on SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD's new web site, along with a link to purchase a copy of the new album online.

    "Five Deadly Venoms" track listing:

    01. Romanza
    02. Centipede
    03. Snake
    04. Scorpion
    05. Lizard
    06. Toad
    07. Mischief and Epiphany
    08. Let Us Welcome The Actors
    09. Last Stand
    10. Farewell
    11. Peace Be Upon You

    SHAOLIN DEATH SQUAD is:

    Vocals: Androo O'Hearn
    Guitar: Dave O'Hearn
    Guitar: Kenny Lovern
    Bass: Gary Thorne
    Drums: Matt Thompson
    Gene Ching
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  4. #19
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    More on Shaolin Death Squad

    a positive review for Five Deadly Venoms
    ‘Five Deadly Venoms’ combines kung fu and metal
    By Aaron Burstein
    Campus Correspondent
    Published: Thursday, February 11, 2010
    Updated: Wednesday, February 10, 2010

    For all the people who ever wished that their love of kung fu movies and progressive metal could be combined into one product, the mask-wearing mystery warriors known as Shaolin Death Squad are here to save the day with their second full-length album entitled “Five Deadly Venoms.” With their latest release, Shaolin Death Squad provides yet another reason why they deserve to be at the forefront of their genre.

    But groups like Shaolin Death Squad have become the odd men out in the progressive metal scene. If well-known progressive metal bands like Dream Theater and Pain of Salvation are equivalent to groups like Genesis and Rush, Shaolin Death Squad must be more like Univers Zero and Henry Cow. SDS is a band that chooses to get their hands dirty and they aren’t afraid to dive into the truly bizarre. Their style deviates from the expected and it makes for a unique and exciting listening experience.

    Perhaps it is an overstatement to claim that Shaolin Death Squad defines the more extreme ends of progressive metal, but they definitely bridge the gap between the straightforward, symphonic prog metal and the wild avant-garde. They employ jaunty, atonal songwriting that reveals a strong influence from avant-prog and even math rock. But they still retain the structured elements of more traditional prog metal, and they pay their homage to classic progressive rock bands while still including a healthy dose of experimentation.

    Contrast is the key to “Five Deadly Venoms’” success. Every song is a balance between tension and melody. Just when the songs seem to be getting too strange, the sound always reverts back to a clear and melodic hook, giving the listener something to hold on to. Musical accessibility is always kept in focus, but nothing is sacrificed in terms of unique songwriting.

    Overall, “Five Deadly Venoms” showcases some of the best music that progressive metal has to offer. Every note is performed with all the elegance and precision of a Shaolin warrior. It’s a great album for fans and newcomers alike.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #20
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    Jake Shimabukuro, one of the worlds greatest ukulele masters, has a really great song about Bruce Lee titled: Dragon.

    Ive seen him live here in Portland at the Chinese Classical Garden and Tea House, and never having seen a ukulele played live before, I was deeply impressed.

    He made his ukulele sound like mutiple different stringed instruments, and played a variety of styles. His skill, accuracy and passion are totally intense.
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  6. #21
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    Kung Fu Sophie

    I found Kung Fu Sophie's MySpace page. There's some music samples there but I haven't listened to them yet.
    Reno musicians raise money for schools
    By: Garrett Estrada
    Monday, March 29, 2010 - 7:19 PM

    Michael Sion didn’t sit idly by and watch his sons play 40-year-old musical instruments in high school — he acted.

    Sion, fed up with the lack of arts funding in Reno high schools, co-founded “Made in Reno” two years ago, a charity event for local high school arts.

    “(Made in Reno) helps high school music students, gives exposure to our local working musicians young and old, boosts foot traffic in our downtown business district where the Knitting Factory is located – and of course treats the audience to an incredibly fresh, high-energy and bargain bill of live entertainment,” Sion said.

    The show gathered 18 local comedy, music and poetry acts under one roof for $10, with all the money going to local high school music programs. Sion, emcee of the show, was “very gratified” by the large turnout.

    “It was a near sellout with over 1,000 people,” Sion said of the show that included local comedy, music and poetry acts that raised $7,740 for local high school music programs. “That shows the grassroots community support for our public schools and our growing music scene.”

    The show featured a fast-paced medley of artists, who performed three songs each. Musical genres, from mellow guitar by Kung Fu Sophie to spoken word poetry by Spoken Views to a performance by the Wooster High School Jazz Band were covered.

    Acoustic pop-rocker Kate Cotter, who was one the many local musicians that performed, said she was excited to be part of the cause.

    “It is just a win-win situation for everyone,” said Cotter, referring to the exposure the artists gained while raising money for the schools.

    Sion’s sons Aaron Sion of Crush and Daniel Sion of Hopscotch Whiskey each spoke out on the need for more money for schools’ music programs. Daniel Sion, who used to play the trombone at Wooster, said that music needs to receive the same kind of attention and funding that football gets in order to keep students active in music. Younger brother Aaron Sion, guitarist for Crush and a junior in the Wooster music program, said there is a need for new equipment in the music program.

    “We have been using stuff that has been there since the ‘70s,” Aaron Sion said.

    The show, held at Studio on Fourth last year, provided the chance for local musicians to sell merchandise and give out free CDs.

    The crowd ebbed and flowed with the style of each musician. It was not uncommon for one act to bring a certain section of people to life, followed by the next act touching a different group.

    The area on front of the stage filled with people dancing and singing along to the songs. ****her back, members of the audience could order food or drinks from the bar and meet the musicians before and after their performances which gave the whole event a meet-and-greet feel.

    Daniel Sion said he hopes the show will help get people interested in more local music and get people to seek out more shows.

    “Check all the bulletin boards for flyers and go to all the basement shows around town; a lot of these guys rock harder than some of the stuff you see at these big stages,” Daniel Sion said.

    Garrett Estrada can be reached at gestrada@nevadasagebrush.com.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #22
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    Slightly OT

    Not quite a kung fu name, but a kung fu vid.
    EXCLUSIVE: Butch Walker's Kung Fu Epic
    By Peter Gaston on April 12, 2010 10:02 AM 1 Comment
    Butch Walker

    L.A. rocker Butch Walker's new single, "Pretty Melody," is a mix of nostalgic '60s pop and modern songrcraft, and its video follows the same ethos, mixing classic matinee cinema and campy kung fu movies with modern special effects. Watch our exclusive premiere below!

    Director Shane Valdez, an up-and-coming filmmaker who Walker describes as "a mix of Spike Jonze and Crispin Glover," helped the 40-year-old musician/producer imbue the video for "Pretty Melody" with a different vibe than the song itself, the second single off Walker's latest album, I Liked It Better When You Had No Heart. "I didn't want the sweetness of the song to be so literally translated into a sappy video because that would be, well, ****ty," Walker tells SPIN.com. "[Valdez] was able to put the tongue-in-ninja's-cheek element into it all and not take itself too seriously."

    And speaking of ninjas, it was Walker's love for old school martial arts movies that fueled the video's concept. "Fist of Fury was the first Bruce Lee movie I saw growing up, and I also loved Game of Death," he says. "This was my whole reason for wanting to do this. I tried to talk the director into using these sweet overdubbed, but loosely-synced voices for the intro dialogue that I did. It definitely added a comedic element, but I suppose the real voices that are there are equally as funny."

    Among the posse of ninjas, you might be able to recognize Panic! at the Disco's Brendon Urie and Spencer Smith. "I know those guys are talented actors and they seem very eager to throw themselves into any situation that might require hamming it up for the camera," says Walker of the duo, with whom he shares management. "[Brendon] is quite the next Marlon Brando -- or Brandon Walsh."

    Urie also starred in a spoof of American Psycho that Walker posted earlier this year.

    Watch the video below, and tell us what you think of Walker's kung fu epic in the comments below.

    WATCH: Butch Walker, "Pretty Melody"
    Gene Ching
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  8. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by yutyeesam View Post
    Taken from the first Kung-Fu Hustle Thread:



    This is really cool! Many martial artists and Kung-Fu masters are also musicians, or have musical ability. I just thought this was an incidental correlation, but it appears that there's more to it...does anyone have any further insights?

    On a strictly superficial level, I can weave parallels between my form performance and in general, things like combat drills or hitting the bag, with my compositioning, in terms of dynamics, rhythm, etc. ...but that's purely on an external level.

    I'd be curious to know anything about the internal aspects, if anyone has any insight into it.

    -123
    kung fu is about your body or physique.

    music is about your soul (emotions and feelings).


  9. #24
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    Taichi band

    Groovy kind of moves
    BY CHAN SOO WAH

    I HAVE had the impression that veteran Hongkong Cantopop star George Lam (below) ‘shouts’, not sings. But I was proved so wrong.

    His concert at the Arena of Stars, Genting Highlands, last Saturday night, showed that he needed no amazing stage set or dancers to entertain the crowd – just his voice and his songs.

    It was an added bonus that Lam has with him on stage, the legendary Taichi Band (above), which set the tone for the night with the screeching intros by lead guitarist Joey Tang and guitarist Ernest Lau as well as an explosive drum solo by Ricky Chu. And when Lam entered, singing his signature hit Man of Determination, the crowd roared their approval. Taichi’s vocalist Patrick Lui added his voice to the mix and later took over for one of the band’s hits, Everyone Sing Together.

    The energetic Taichi Band rocked on without Lam with Upright, Stormy Lips, Happy and Sad, and ended its session with Every Words. Lui was prancing around on stage and kept inviting the crowd to stand up and dance but his requests seemed to fall on deaf ears.

    Even Lam was prompted to ask at one point in the night: "Have you all waken up from your nap yet?" After all, it was a rock concert, for goodness sake!

    The 62-year-old crooner was, however, undeterred by the subdued reaction from the majority of the crowd, continuing to woo them, this time, with a string of love songs, including To Avoid Further Tragedy, Who Do You Love, 1,000 Stings and Forgotten Dreams.

    When Lam called for a volunteer to come onstage and sing with him the duet, Choose (which he had performed with his wife Sally Yeh), a tourist from China ran to join him. Despite being rather shaky at the start, she turned out to be quite good.

    The ballads continued with Lam and the Taichi Band covering Eric Clapton’s Wonderful Tonight and Percy Sledge’s When a Man Loves a Woman. And when Lam continued with the love song, Need You Every Minute, the crowd warmed up and sang along.

    The mood changed again with Number Life, one of Lam’s hits in which the lyrics consist of numerals! The pace heated up with Taichi Band’s Red Sports Car, Crystal and Keep Me.

    Lam returned with yet another of his classics, Digital Life, and his Cantonese version of Billy Joel’s Uptown Girl, renamed I Love You. He ended his concert with Mirage and came back with the Taichi Band to deliver Who Can Understand Me? as an encore.

    It was only then that the crowd stood up and danced to the next few tracks including the rock ’n’ roll number That One Night, Flower Street No.7, Nothing Gonna Stop as well as an impressive rendition of Santana and Rob Thomas’ Smooth by Lam.

    The concert finally ended but not before bowing to requests from the crowd for Drizzles on Me by the Taichi Band and 0:10 and Ten Million Nights by Lam.

    Altogether, Lam and the band delivered 34 songs but without Lam’s famous 10-minute-long medley, 10 Minutes 12 Inches.

    Despite the crowd’s initial lack of enthusiasm, Lam still has this to say: "I’ve been staging concerts in Malaysia since the 80s and I can tell you that Malaysian fans are the best!"

    Updated: 11:12AM Thu, 13 May 2010
    A rock concert, for goodness sake? Who the heck uses 'for goodness sake' to review a rock concert?
    Gene Ching
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  10. #25
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    "It is the peculiar quality of a fool to perceive the faults of others and to forget his own." -Cicero

  11. #26
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    I need you to understand...

    ...I don't endorse this video just because there's a ballerina with numchuks.
    Travie McCoy: Need You [OFFICIAL VIDEO]
    Gene Ching
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  12. #27
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    I need you to understand...

    ...I don't endorse this video just because there's a dominitrix with numchuks.

    Overlord (Director's Cut)
    Black Label Society
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  13. #28
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    What?

    No Numbchuks?
    December 22nd, 2010
    The Asian Influence on Hip Hop
    by Zoey Flowers

    The Asian Influence on Hip Hop - Wu Tang Clan“The Asian delegation chooses the RZA, the GZA, U-God, Inspectah Deck, the Ghostface Killah: the Wu-Tang Clan.” The leaders of the legendary hip hop group, RZA and GZA come to the stage and blissfully accept this selection. RZA explains, “This is big for us, yo, because we’ve always been a fan of the kung fu and the Chinese culture”.

    Yes, Dave Chapelle has brought us some memorable moments on The Chapelle Show, and declaring Wu-Tang Clan was now fully Asian was definitely one of them.

    But let’s be real. The Asian culture has truly influenced some of our hip hop heavyweights. From their music and videos to even their lifestyle, rappers have done their homework. In the words of Rza from his book, The Tao of Wu, “Wu-Tang Clan truly did take a martial arts approach to hip hop – to the sound of music, the style of the lyrics, the competitive wordplay of the rhyming, the mental preparations involved”. Rza named this book after Tao, known as “the way” from Chinese philosopher, Lao Tzu, who is considered the founder of Taoism. Even the rap group’s name originated from the art of fighting. In the1981 kung-fu film, Shaolin and Wu Tang, two rival martial arts schools, Shaolin and Wudangquan, display their kung fu and sword fighting. The movie had the rap group enamored enough to name themselves after it. When RZA was thirteen years old, he watched another kung-fu film, The Thirty-sixth Chamber of Shaolin. Eleven years later, the classic album, Enter the Wu-Tang 36 Chambers, was released by the hip hop elite.

    Quite influential, the Shaolin monks are known for their peacefulness, inner life force or chi, and most popularly, their mesmerizing fighting techniques. A protected culture, it has been said that once you were in Shaolin, you couldn’t just get up and leave. It was a world with internal rules and bylaws. But throughout its history and time, things have changed. Shi Yan Ming, a 34th generation Shaolin warrior monk, launched The USA Shaolin Temple to share the Shaolin philosophy with the world. Unsurprisingly, some of his students have included members of the multi-platinum rap group, such as Ol’ Dirty *******, Ghostface Killa and of course, RZA, who had the renowned warrior write the foreword for his book. In addition to members of the Wu, Shi Yan Ming’s students have also included Busta Rhymes, members of A Tribe Called Quest, and Jeru the Damaja.

    The Asian Influence on Hip Hop - Jeru the Damaja

    Legendary rapper, Jeru, has made no secret of also being heavily influenced by the Asian culture. An avid lover of kung fu movies, his classic single, Ya Playin Yaself, portrays a backdrop of Hong Kong as Jeru is draped in traditional Chinese garments. In the beginning of the video, Jeru is kneeled down holding numerous sticks of incense. The classic clip continues with a game of mah-jong, which he interrupts to spar in a kung-fu style fight. Jeru’s Far East inspiration was so strong that even the cover of the album, Wrath of the Math, portrays the young lyricist donning the Chinese-style clothing. There’s no doubt that hip hop has shown the Asian culture a lot of love with their music as well as genuine interest from hip hop artists. As they say, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”.

    And there’s also no doubt that that love is being returned to hip hop with our own movement. Alongside a strong influence, hip hop has also had stars of Asian ancestry. Inga Fung Marchand, better known as rapstress Foxy Brown, is part Filipino and has identified herself in her sop****re album as Chyna Doll. Part Filipino Black Eyed Peas member, Apl.de.ap, gives back to the children in the Philippines and Asia with his Apl Foundation. In addition, established artists of Chinese descent include Ashanti, Kelis, and Ne-Yo.

    The Asian Influence on Hip Hop - Jin

    The Asian hip hop movement is definitely in effect. When the ink dried on his Ruff Ryders contract, Jin became the first Asian rapper signed to a major record label. Setting his place in history, I don’t think I could say it any better than he already did on Same Cry. “I got some big shoes to fill. But if I don’t lead the movement, then who will”. With his spot secured in the hip hop books, Jin released his debut Cantonese album, ABC, produced entirely by a group called Far East Movement (Have you heard of them?). Producers as well as rappers, this group is now dominating the charts and radio waves with Like a G6. FM’s name certainly holds weight as they are unquestionably part of this significant movement.

    And this expansion has just begun.

    Thanks to the likes of Carl Choi, Misnomers, Jin, Far East Movement, Southstar, Joseph Vincent, Channel APA, and so many more, the Asian culture is becoming more than just a moment in hip hop. It is well on its way to becoming a force in entertainment. I must say that I am more than grateful to be here for our history in the making.
    Gene Ching
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  14. #29
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    Someone posted this on kfc.com I don't know if it's real or not.

    "For someone who's a Shaolin monk, your kung fu's really lousy!"
    "What, you're dead? You die easy!"
    "Hold on now. I said I would forget your doings, but I didn't promise to spare your life. Take his head."
    “I don’t usually smoke this brand, but I’ll do it for you.”
    "When all this is over, Tan Hai Chi, I will kick your head off and put it on my brother's grave!
    "I regard hardships as part of my training. I don't need to relax."

  15. #30
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    Shaolin Afronauts

    Love that band name, but I'll be sorely disappointed if the band members lack afros...
    * From: The Advertiser
    * February 03, 2011 12:00AM

    Shaolin Afronauts

    The Shaolin Afronauts, Kevin van derZwaag, Ross McHenry and Lachlan Ridge. Picture: Matt Turner Source: The Advertiser

    DON'T be alarmed - these mysterious men in hooded monk outfits mean no harm.

    They're The Shaolin Afronauts, an Adelaide-based afrobeat band who are part of the eclectic line-up at this year's Womadelaide music festival.

    "We try to explore the music of 1970s West Africa with our own take on that," one of the group members, Ross McHenry says.

    "It's very expressive music ... it actually helps to have some sort of guise that you can use to express yourself so that you're not standing there in T-shirt and jeans."

    The unique outfits also help to disguise Ross and fellow musician Kevin van der Zwaag, who you might know from their other group, The Transatlantics.

    Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

    End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

    Seven members of the 10-piece Afronauts are in The Transatlantics.

    "It's just cool music and great sounds, once you hear it, you have to investigate," Kevin says.

    Get an early taste of the Afronauts as they perform at the Womadelaide Warm Up Party at The Highway on February 9.

    The free all-ages event features ticket giveaways and limited edition Womadelaide merchandise.

    Womadelaide is on from

    March 11 to 14 in Botanic Park
    Gene Ching
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