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Thread: Why do that with a staff?

  1. #1
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    Why do that with a staff?

    I've seen a couple of southern staff forms that have a particular move in it that I don't understand. They spin the staff above their head with one hand and with an open palm. the staff is just spinning unsupported but for the open palm. It has no power or stability. I've only seen it in some CLF forms and on David Jameson's website. Can someone tell me why you would do that and why it is in these forms?
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    AND, yea, a good bit of it is about whether you can fight with what you know...kinda all of it is about that.

  2. #2
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    cause its purty?
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  3. #3
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    Is the move preceeded by them yelling "Go Go Gadget Helicopter"?
    He most honors my style who learns under it to destroy the teacher. -- Walt Whitman

    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    As a mod, I don't have to explain myself to you.

  4. #4
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    Smile No a weapon expert but...

    It would help to have the context of the move such as what comes before and what's after. I have a few explanation for that.

    1) In modern term, it looks cool to use that move and it will score higher with the competition judges.

    2) In training term, it helps to see the control of the staff by the exponent.

    3) In pratical/traditional term, it was design not to be flinging loosely. Rather it should be well controlled spinning so that you can create space between you and opponents riding on horses. The southern staff or spear for that matter is after all considered more or less a long range weapon. This would also applied if you are in a city/town setting (ie restaurant) where multiple people can make use of tables to jump down on the staff user. It's rare these days but it could happen in the old days where the conflicts between the government and underground societies were more common.

    Just some thoughts

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by MasterKiller
    Is the move preceeded by them yelling "Go Go Gadget Helicopter"?
    ****!!!!!! THAT'S WHAT I'VE BEEN MISSING!!!!!!
    Message: Due to the ongoing Recession, God has decided the light at the end of the tunnel will be shut off due to power costs. That is all.

  6. #6
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    In training term, it helps to see the control of the staff by the exponent.
    *ding*

    weapon control is a large part of weapon training. there's lot's of drills and practices that don't apply to usage but do apply to control of the weapon and overall balance, strength, etc etc.

    in the instance of the clip from my site you mention, it's a control method but also part of form closure which is generally stylized techniques denoting where the set came from or who it came from.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  7. #7
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    Judge Pen,

    In the Lee Koon Hung school of Choy Lay Fut we do not have this move, maybe it was taken out or maybe other schools developed it....

    Every once in a while in various styles you will see a move that was added somewhere down the line to show the control of the weapon, either for a show or just basic handling...

    But I have seen this move before, usually by someone who is not very good, so I am not a good judge... But I like practical more than pretty...

    I have seen some people use the tiger fork where they roll it around there arms and shoulders to get the fork to spin and look cool... Again another move for looks... And we dont have that one either...

    Joe

  8. #8
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    Is the move preceeded by them yelling "Go Go Gadget Helicopter"?
    LOL, that's the funniest thing I've read on this forum to date.

    Yeah i'ev seen this also wone with that weapon that looks like a devil's pitchfork... Tiger fork?

    I agree, although it's a "controlled" spin, when its just rotating on your palm I can't see much actual use in that move in combat.... But I guess general weapon control is always a good thing to have.
    Last edited by - Human; 12-15-2005 at 12:09 PM.

  9. #9
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    there is no use for it in combat.

    just like your school bow really doesn't have a practical combat use, or bowing, or lighting incense or some other ritualistic practice that is part and parcel to every single school of chinese martial arts that ever there was.

    not everything that is in martial arts practice has martial application and people who say everything should are taking the anus point of view of martial arts. lol

    ask about combat stretching. everyone does it, no martial application, or how about combat situps and pushups? combat cardio anyone? combat sand can lifting? combat weight lifting? anyway...you get the inference.

    There are entire forms that are more or less a string of different chi kungs. Then, amonst the gongs, a couple of combat moves, then back to the string of gongs. These types of practices are quite common across many styles of chinese martial arts. It is a design of efficient use of time in practice more than anything.

    If you have 50 moves in a set and you practice that set 1000 times, then you have practiced each of those moves 1000 times. Now, this build takes a while, but you will effectively have more usable things in the long wrong an hence the variant heavy nature of chinese martial arts.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  10. #10
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    a palm spin in forms usually is used to show mastery of the weapon. However, it could be used to reverse the end of say a spear, or another weapon with an edge on only onne side,not a staff. When I was learning Sayoc Kali, we learned to palm spin the knife from sabre grip to reverse (ice pick) grip, and back with a flat palm spin, as well as other methods, until it became natural and can be used during transitional moves. That being said, what applies to a small hand held weapon might not also have the same application to a larger weapon, and I am completely wrong and a total whack job!

  11. #11
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    I have seen it in northern spear, more specifically in a pek kwar spear form I learned called lien wan cheung.

    As far as being in a southern staff form it doesn't make much sense. The majority of southern staff sets are with longer single head poles (shui may kwun - rat tail staff) and there is typically very little if any spinning moves. There might be an occational flower but I have never seen what you described in a staff set especially CLF.

  12. #12
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    I thought of a use for the move: arrows falling straight down on you
    so you spin the staff in hopes of not getting impaled. what do you think?

  13. #13
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    The move your describing originated with horse back kwan do. It's a way of changeing your grip with one hand while you control the horse with the other. In application you would only give it a half spin to turn your grip around but for training balance and control they let it spin a couple times in forms.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson
    there is no use for it in combat.

    just like your school bow really doesn't have a practical combat use, or bowing, or lighting incense or some other ritualistic practice that is part and parcel to every single school of chinese martial arts that ever there was.

    not everything that is in martial arts practice has martial application and people who say everything should are taking the anus point of view of martial arts. lol

    ask about combat stretching. everyone does it, no martial application, or how about combat situps and pushups? combat cardio anyone? combat sand can lifting? combat weight lifting? anyway...you get the inference.

    There are entire forms that are more or less a string of different chi kungs. Then, amonst the gongs, a couple of combat moves, then back to the string of gongs. These types of practices are quite common across many styles of chinese martial arts. It is a design of efficient use of time in practice more than anything.

    If you have 50 moves in a set and you practice that set 1000 times, then you have practiced each of those moves 1000 times. Now, this build takes a while, but you will effectively have more usable things in the long wrong an hence the variant heavy nature of chinese martial arts.

    OK. How can you completely write off the possibility that twirling a staff above your head could be functional in combat? Have you experimented with it? Have you done research? Have you ever had to defend yourself against a cavalry?

    And in reference to your comment stating, "not everything that is in martial arts practice has martial application..." what about natural stance? I've learned three different natural stances so far, and two of those three have been demonstrated to show me their practical use in combat. Natural stance with the hands to the front, can block the groin; natural stance with the hands in prayer position can be used to either knock an attackers hands away if they are grabbing you, or to sandwich a punch or weapon attack (if you're incredibly advanced of course). Even if you were to bow with your right hand at your chest, you could use that hand to block or strike with a Buddha palm.

    I've only just started, but I know what I've seen. Any time we learn anything, we usually get a little demonstration of it's practicality in combat. I've been taught 3 forms so far, and every movement in each of those forms can be effective in a fight.

  15. #15
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    I've been in the martial arts for over 16 years. I could not think of any practical application for spinning a staff or spear over your head with the palm open. That's why I started the trhead, hoping that someone else could provide more insight.

    As for showing "mastery" over the weapon.... I don't know. It's not that hard to learn to do.
    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    AND, yea, a good bit of it is about whether you can fight with what you know...kinda all of it is about that.

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