Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 46 to 49 of 49

Thread: Tai Chi Robot

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,099

    Push Hands bot

    There's a vid behind the link.

    Meet the robot that knows KUNG FU: Fascinating video shows super flexible automated arm practising Tai Chi moves with a martial arts master
    The newly unveiled robotic arm has seven joints and is extremely nimble
    In a commercial, it showcases impressive Tai Chi moves with a human expert
    It's produced by a major Chinese robot manufacturer for assembly lines
    By Tracy You For Mailonline
    PUBLISHED: 08:10 EDT, 20 October 2017 | UPDATED: 08:46 EDT, 20 October 2017

    In a country with a passion for robots and Kung Fu, it's only a matter of time when machines would be taught how to do martial arts.

    But before that, a commercial from a Chinese robot manufacturer has shown us what a human-versus-machine Tai Chi duel could look like.

    An incredible video has emerged which shows a robotic arm practising a series of Tai Chi moves with a master.


    Wax on, was off: A Kung Fu master practises Tai Chi with a robotic arm in a new commercial


    Everybody is Kung Fu fighting! The robotic arm has seven axes and is extremely nimble

    The video is an advertisement released by Siasun, a Chinese industrial robot manufacturer.

    The four-minute-long commercial features Siasun's two new models. Each of them practises its skills with the master one on one.

    Both models have seven axes, which apparently allow them to lift up, bend down and turn around at ease.


    Impressive: Produced by Chinese industrial robot manufacturer Siasun, the robotic arm is not likely to do Kung Fu in real life. It's been designed to work on assembly lines with limited space


    The robot model has seven axes, which apparently allow them to lift, bend and turn easily

    The two robotic arms demonstrate classic Tai Chi moves with the master, dressed in traditional Chinese clothing.

    The seven-axis robots are designed to work on assembly lines, according to Siasun, one of China's largest industrial robots suppliers based in Shanghai.

    The company claimed that these robotic arms were designed especially for factories with limited space and high accuracy requirements.

    It's unlikely that these robots would be used to do Kung Fu in real life, but Siasun said they could be masters in precision assembly, product packaging, polishing, loading and unloading.

    Apparently, the Siasun robots are not the only machines that could pull off Kung Fu stunts.

    Last month, over 1,000 robots and 10 martial artists performed Kung Fu choreography in unison in north-east China's Harbin city.

    The spectacular performance took place during a national robot competition, according to CGTN.
    JOBS THAT PAY LESS THAN $20 ARE AT RISK OF ROBOT TAKEOVER
    In a recent McKinsey report, researchers analysed more than 2,000 work activities for over 800 occupations, looking at the amount of time spent on particular activities, and the feasibility of automating these tasks.

    For jobs which involve performing predictable physical activities, the researchers say the feasibility of automation is roughly 78 percent.

    The findings include:

    59 percent of manufacturing activities could be automated. Within this field, the researchers say 90 percent of the activities of welders, cutters, solderers and brazers could be done by a robot.
    73 percent of activities in food service and accommodations could be automated
    53 percent of retail work could be automated; 47 percent of the salesperson’s job could be automated, while 86 percent of bookkeepers, accountant and auditing clerks has this potential



    For jobs which involve performing predictable physical activities, the researchers say the feasibility of automation is roughly 78 percent, but this is not the only factor to be considered when determining which jobs could soon be taken over by robots

    They also detailed the activities with low potential for automation:

    Education
    Healthcare, especially those which require expertise and direct contact with patients, like dental hygienist
    'Knowledge work,' including management jobs
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,099

    T-HR3 video

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,099

    Moorebot Zeus Battle Robot

    Tabletop battle robot does tai chi, karate
    Is it a video game come to life, an educational toy, or a developer's platform? Yup, says the company behind it.

    By Greg Nichols for Robotics | July 17, 2018 -- 09:13 GMT (02:13 PDT) | Topic: Robotics



    What is it about humans? We see a robot, we immediately want to know how it'll fare in battle against another robot.

    Playing right into that hardwired need is a new home robot from Pilot Labs called the Moorebot Zeus Battle Robot, which is now available on Amazon.

    Living up to its name, the platform was designed to fight other robots. Given what's under the hood, this real-life avatar seems more than capable of fulfilling that primary objective.



    "This might be most competitive fighter and robot athlete in the world," says Jun Ye, CEO of Shenzhen-based Pilot Labs. "From Boxing to Kung Fu to Karate to Robot Olympics."

    At 14 inches and nearly five pounds, this thing is hefty. The humanoid is actuated by 22 metal-geared servo motors, each rated with a 25Kg punch force. The little fighter actually delivers punches at a speed of 150m/sec, meaning it's only a matter of time before someone accidentally gets their teeth knocked in messing around with one of these.

    Although the robot is designed to fight other robots -- and in particular other Zeus robots, since consumers don't have many off-the-shelf battle bot options -- Pilot Labs is also marketing Zeus to hobbyists and developers who might use the robot as a platform for further customization.

    Because you assemble the robot at home, Zeus is also being marketed as an educational toy that can teach kids (the big kind as well as the little ones) about robotics.

    With that fragmented marketing strategy, Pilot Labs could be in for a bumpy launch. The educational robot market is already saturated, with brands like Lego and Wonder Workshop out to solid leads.

    The market for battle robots, meanwhile, isn't well-developed; the hobby remains niche worldwide.

    As a remote controlled humanoid and not an autonomous sensor platform, it's unclear how useful Zeus would be to robotics developers. Considering it costs $1600, vying for customers in any of these three challenging markets would be tough, but tackling all three at the same time seems unwise.

    Still, for unbridled cool factor I'm guessing this robot will gain some early adopters, and it could become an underground hit via YouTube, which might spur sales.

    Zeus operates for about 50 minutes on a charge. It comes preprogrammed with a number of fighting moves, and it can also be customized with an included graphical programming tool.

    THREADS:
    Tai Chi Robot
    martial arts robot
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,099

    NAO Robot

    September 28, 2022 by Michelle Cometa
    Faculty researchers develop humanoid robotic system to teach Tai Chi

    System helps keep older adults active and improve cognitive function


    Assistant Professor Zhi Zheng demonstrates some of the coordinated moves of her NAO Robot, programmed to teach tai chi to older adults. The work is part of a larger research project to assess how integrating technology can impact cognitive functions.
    Zhi Zheng’s robot is skilled at Tai Chi, and her research team hopes it will soon lead a class of older adults at a local community center. Her robot is more than a cute companion. It can help improve cognitive function and provide insights about how people interact with robots in various settings.

    Zheng, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering, developed a sophisticated humanoid robot as part of her assistive technology research.

    With expertise in developing robotics and virtual reality systems, Zheng’s work explores human-machine intelligence. She is part of a larger RIT cross-disciplinary team using artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics to design assistive technologies that can impact mental health care.

    “My major research direction is for individuals with developmental disorders. Many core technologies are transferable to other populations such as older adults with mild cognitive impairment,” said Zheng, who leads the Intelligent Interaction Research Lab. The lab is focused on several funded technology-mediated initiatives including healthcare for older adults with multiple chronic conditions and interventions for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

    The Tai Chi leader is an NAO Robot, and although only about 2 feet tall, it is a highly sophisticated system that can be programmed with specific functions and tasks.

    “We don’t have to build our own robot hardware because there are good commercial platforms available. How it behaves solely depends on how we design the control programs. The central part of our research is how we control the robots to do the cognitive and physical instruction properly,” Zheng said. “The robot does not really know how to behave coming out of the box. We teach it how to function.”

    Teaching it Tai Chi was one of those functions.

    A popular mind-body exercise, Tai Chi consists of choreographed motions, meditation, and proper breathing. Different movements require the practitioner to rely on many cognitive functions such as working memory and visual-spatial processing to memorize the patterned gestures. Movement stimulates blood flow through the brain, and for older adults, this has been shown to be beneficial to longevity, memory, and learning.

    Using robots as facilitators is a growing research field, and Zheng has seen movement from lab-based work to community-based field studies.

    “There is a big difference. Everything in the lab is controlled, and people can be nervous and cautious. That does not really reflect their natural reactions,” she said. “Now the field is trying to understand and study what if we move the technology out of the engineering building to a community center, for example? People are relaxed, and their reactions will be more natural using new technology. Technology has to be easily controlled by a non-expert—that relates to our interface design. We want our robot to be operated by a leader or a social worker at the community center—because technology is designed to serve people. It has to fit in the community.”

    Some onsite work was paused for a short time during the pandemic, but has since resumed with Zheng leading a research team that includes Victor Perotti, professor in Saunders College of Business; Yong Tai Wang, dean of the College of Health Sciences and Technology; Peter Bajorski, professor of statistics in the College of Science. (Under review is a Department of Health and Human Services grant proposal for the work that will also include colleagues from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.)

    Wang brings more than 20 years of experience instructing and practicing Tai Chi, and Bajorski has worked previously with Zheng on a separate Department of Health and Human Services grant to measure aspects of ASD. Coupled with research in the area of the Theory of Mind—the study of human-robot interactions and the effectiveness of using robots as research facilitators—the team combines psychology and inter-personal communications with applications built on human-centered artificial intelligence, one of RIT’s key research areas.

    “I think of myself as a user and builder of artificial intelligence because I design my own system frameworks, my own algorithms. Those are more elemental in the AI spectrum,” she said. “And I also look to other people’s work to add to my research. I’m standing on the shoulders of giants!”
    Well framed pic for a 2 ft tall bot.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •