Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 49

Thread: Tai Chi Robot

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    slight OT

    Samurai robot!

    A New Samurai Robot From Japan
    Posted on Nov 10, 10 04:07 AM PDT
    A New Samurai Robot From Japan

    JR Propo and Matsuyoshi Dolls have teamed up to create a samurai robot based on Date Masamune, a real-life samurai who founded the modern day city of Sendai. The robot stands tall at 67cm, weighs 10kg and is able to offer five spoken phrases. In terms of visuals, the robot does look impressive, though its 1,000,000 Yen ($12,300) price tag will be a deterrent to many. The president of Matsuyoshi Dolls has said that they aren't actually planning on selling it, though they might rent it out for corporate events and the robot's first job was to help open the 23rd Industrial Exhibition in Higashi, Osaka. Perhaps we'll be seeing samurai robot armies in the future.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Nao

    Humanoid robots practice Tai Chi at equipment expo
    Xinhua | 2012-9-2 11:07:07
    By Agencies



    A humanoid robot known as "Nao" is seen during the 11th China International Equipment Manufacturing Exposition in Shenyang, capital of northeast China's Liaoning Province, Sept. 1, 2012. A total of four humanoid robots, which can sing, dance and even demonstrate the popular martial art Tai chi, were displayed during the Exposition. Photo: Xinhua
    I've been trying to visualize a non-humanoid robot practicing Tai Chi...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Slightly OT

    Wickedly cool pix if you follow the link.
    Tai Chi on Mars: Nasa tests out Curiosity's robot arm as engineers reveal the tiny piece of New Mexico on the red planet

    Engineers say seeing latest pictures were a 'profoundly emotional moment'
    Robotic arm carrying out 'some very complex tai chi' to test its movement
    Piece of New Mexico rock and a 1909 penny being used to calibrate instruments

    By Mark Prigg
    PUBLISHED: 03:48 EST, 11 September 2012 | UPDATED: 04:32 EST, 11 September 2012

    Nasa has revealed new pictures of Curiosity 'looking back' at one of its cameras on the martian surface.

    It comes as they confirmed the rover has now tested its robotic arm successfully, using a 1909 penny and a piece of rock from New Mexico to calibrate its instruments.

    The team admitted even they were surprised by the quality of images being sent back after dust covers were removed from the rover's main cameras.


    Nasa today released this incredible image of Curiosity on the red planet, showing off its wheels and four 'navcams' which act as the rover's eyes on the red planet.

    'Wow, seeing these images after all the tremendous hard work that has gone into making them possible is a profoundly emotional moment,' said MAHLI Principal Investigator Ken Edgett of Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.

    'It is so exciting to see the camera returning beautiful, sharp images from Mars.'

    NASA's Mars rover Curiosity stepped through activities on Sept. 7, 8 and 9 designed to check and characterize precision movements by the rover's robotic arm and use of tools on the arm.

    The activities confirmed good health and usefulness of Mars Hand Lens Imager, or MAHLI, and used that camera to check arm placement during several positioning activities.

    MAHLI took an image with its reclosable dust cover open for the first time on Mars, confirming sharp imaging capability that had been obscured by a thin film of dust on the cover during previous use of the camera.

    It took images of cameras at the top of Curiosity's mast, of the underbelly of the rover and of MAHLI's own calibration target, among other pointings.

    The camera's calibration target includes a 1909 Lincoln penny that Edgett purchased for this purpose.


    The team calibrated the camera using a 'lucky penny' on the rover's mast

    'We're seeing the penny in the foreground and, looking past it, a setting I'm sure the people who minted these coins never imagined,' Edgett said.

    The penny is a nod to geologists' tradition of placing a coin or other object of known scale as a size reference in close-up photographs of rocks, and it gives the public a familiar object for perceiving size easily when it will be viewed by MAHLI on Mars.

    'The folks who drive the rover's arm and turret have taken a 220-pound arm through some very complex tai chi, to center a penny in an image that's only a few centimeters across,' said MAHLI Deputy Principal Investigator Aileen Yingst of the Tucson-based Planetary Science Institute.

    'They make the impossible look easy.'

    The arm characterization activities, including more imaging by MAHLI, will continue for a few days before Curiosity resumes driving toward a mid-term science destination area called Glenelg.

    In that area, the rover may use its scoop to collect a soil sample, and later its drill to collect a sample of powder from inside a rock.

    Curiosity is five weeks into a two-year prime mission on Mars.

    It will use 10 science instruments to assess whether the selected study area ever has offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Even more OT

    November 14, 2012
    China turns robotic
    Guardian News Media


    A customer collects a drink from a robot waiter cycling around a restaurant in Jinan in eastern China's Shandong province in this December 2010 photograph. The restaurant features robots performing the tasks of waiters, receptionists and entertainers to attract customers. AP Photo

    In China, there's no better time to be a robot. Pictures from last week's International Industry Fair in Shanghai show them duelling with light sabers, playing ping pong and dancing in lion costumes. One shows a female robot in a white wool coat shaking hands with a visitor.

    According to the Frankfurt-based International Federation of Robotics, China could become the world's biggest consumer of industrial robots by 2014, with demand reaching 32,000 units. Gudrun Litzenberger, theorganisation's general secretary, has described China as the fastest-growing robot market in the world.

    China has many reasons to embrace industrial robotics. Robots can improve energy efficiency and perform operations that would prove impossibly complex for even the best-trained humans. But the most important reasons are shifting demographics and basic economics: China's working-age population is shrinking, sending labour costs spiralling upwards.

    “There aren't many young workers coming off the streets to fill jobs at factories. That's why you're seeing factory wages going up, and factories struggling to hire trained staff," said Geoff Crothall, a spokesman for the Hong Kong-based China Labor Bulletin. "It's not surprising that you'd see greater focus on greater automation of production”, he added.

    China's growing affluence and family planning laws have had dramatic effects on its workforce. Improved medical care has enabled older generations to live longer, and the one-child policy has effectively capped the younger generation's size.

    In 2000 there were six working-age citizens for each Chinese person aged 60 and up; 20 years from now, population experts predict, there will be only two. Young Chinese have no choice but to seek skilled, high-paying work to support their parents. They're better educated than their forebears, and less interested in menial assembly-line labour. Robots may fill the jobs they've left behind.

    China still ranks low on the global robotic hierarchy, according to the state-run China Daily. Last year, there were 21 robots for every 10,000 workers in China, compared with a global average of 55. Japan has 339 robots for every 10,000 workers; Germany has 251.

    This is changing. The Taiwanese manufacturing giant Foxconn has revealed plans to boost its fleet of industrial robots from 10,000 to 1m within three years. According to the company's CEO, Terry Gou, robots will replace workers for tasks such as spraying, assembling and welding.

    Chinese officials have openly championed the industry's growth. The Shanghai municipal government has called robotics "one of its major industries", wrote the China Daily. At a press conference on 12th November, the vice-minister for human resources and social security, Yang Zhiming, emphasised the need to "upgrade equipment and technology".

    Where the government sees potential, Chinese firms see the potential for incentives. "China needs to subsidise its own enterprises - to improve its own equipment manufacturing, and to make sure that its own enterprises can compete with foreign technology," said an employee of the Shanghai-based SIASUN Robot and Automation Company. The employee said SIASUN had not yet received subsidies from the Shanghai government, but that a deal may be in the works.

    Even outside the factory, robots - jiqiren in Chinese, literally "mechanical people" - have proliferated in China, many of them homegrown. China's National University of Defence Technology unveiled the country's first bipedal humanoid robot in 2000, after more than a decade of research. Chinese media lauded the block-headed robot as a technological advance, but its slapdash appearance - and the unfortunate placement of a protruding joint - made it the brunt of online jokes in tech-savvy Japan.

    A Chinese farmer, Wu Yulu, shot to fame in 2009 for building robots that could pull rickshaws, climb walls and light visitors' cigarettes. One local television station dubbed him "China's cleverest farmer inventor",according to Reuters. In 2010, a hotpot restaurant opened in coastal Shandong province with more than a dozen Star Wars-style droids as entertainers and hosts.

    In March, a Chinese restauranteur launched a line of 1,200 robots that can slice thick-cut noodles out of blocks of dough."Following the market's increase in demand for talent, young people aren't willing to do such dirty, tiring work," the restaurateur, Cui Runguan, told Zoomin.TV. "So not only in sliced noodle restaurants, but also in many other regards, we'll follow our technological development - and there will be many, many machines that can replace human labour."
    I'm a little surprised by this as I tend to think of Japan as more into robots. China has such a large human labor force that it just doesn't seem as economically sound to invest in robots.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Well, well...

    Just like real Tai Chi...

    Next thing you know, they'll make a Tai Chi robot that sits on its ass and posts drivel on this forum all day.
    Busting a move: HKU unveils humanoid robot - and it breaks its ankle
    PUBLISHED : Friday, 18 October, 2013, 9:58am
    UPDATED : Friday, 18 October, 2013, 2:54pm
    Darren Wee darren.wee@scmp.com


    The robot demonstrating tai chi. Photo: Jonathan Wong

    A Terminator-like Atlas robot broke its ankle on its debut at the University of Hong Kong yesterday during a disastrous demonstration.

    The 150kg, 1.9-metre-tall robot, which cost HK$15 million, is the most advanced humanoid robot to date, and HKU is the first institution outside the United States to own one.

    But after demonstrating a short tai chi routine, the robot lost its balance and fell, breaking its right ankle.

    HKU is competing against institutions including US space agency Nasa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop software to control the Atlas in a robotics challenge funded by the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

    HKU Advanced Robotics Initiative leader Wyatt Newman said the university was the first of the seven competing institutions to get the robot's head, body and hands all working, but it would be six years before humanoid robots could be used in real-life situations.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post

    Next thing you know, they'll make a robot that sits on its ass and posts drivel on this forum all day.
    there is a prototype forum with a bunch of robots posting this way already

    http://kungfumagazine.com/

    (think anyone will get this?)
    Chan Tai San Book at https://www.createspace.com/4891253

    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    well, like LKFMDC - he's a genuine Kung Fu Hero™
    Quote Originally Posted by Taixuquan99 View Post
    As much as I get annoyed when it gets derailed by the array of strange angry people that hover around him like moths, his good posts are some of my favorites.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kellen Bassette View Post
    I think he goes into a cave to meditate and recharge his chi...and bite the heads off of bats, of course....

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Just like real Tai Chi...

    Next thing you know, they'll make a Tai Chi robot that sits on its ass and posts drivel on this forum all day.
    The future is now.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    This is 100% TCMA principle. It may be used in non-TCMA also. Since I did learn it from TCMA, I have to say it's TCMA principle.
    Quote Originally Posted by YouKnowWho View Post
    We should not use "TCMA is more than combat" as excuse for not "evolving".

    You can have Kung Fu in cooking, it really has nothing to do with fighting!

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Samurai robot!
    Why does that picture remind me of trilogy of terror?

    Reboot?

  9. #39
    In the next few years, you're gonna see a lot of this kind of thing. Even hobbyists are making some incredible bots. Mechatronics on the rise!

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Slightly OT

    What? Labor is too expensive in China? srsly?

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Tai Chi-Teaching Robot & Autism

    This one is an embedded vid, so you have to follow the link.
    Could This Tai Chi-Teaching Robot Change Autism?

    Aug. 12 (Bloomberg) –- Italian researchers have produced a prototype robot that can engage and monitor autistic children. Bloomberg’s Angus Bennett finds out how this innovative solution can treat those with the disorder. (Source: Bloomberg)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Nao

    Meet Nao, a cute and friendly humanoid robot that can do Tai chi


    Above: Nao
    Image Credit: Dean Takahashi
    December 3, 2014 7:00 AM
    Dean Takahashi

    Nao could usher in the age of social humanoid robots that are designed to live and work with humans. Aldebaran Robotics, a French company owned by Japan’s SoftBank, has created five versions of the robots in the last nine years with this dream in mind.

    Nao is a cute and friendly robot aimed at creating warm and fuzzy feelings. It costs a lot less than it once did, but is still pricey at around $7,000 to $8,000. I got a good look at the robot at the Global Mobile Internet Conference (GMIC) in San Francisco yesterday. Among its tricks: He performed Tai chi exercises in a way that showed off his flexible joints, he got up from a squatting position, and he picked himself up once he was pushed on the ground.

    Paris-based Aldebaran isn’t selling Nao directly to consumers yet. That’s coming in the next year or so. But it is exploring applications for schools and universities, such as helping children with autism through interactive games and apps. SoftBank is using a different version, dubbed Pepper, to improve the customer experience at its SoftBank mobile stores in Japan.

    “He’s not going to be able to open the fridge and get you a beer,” said Laura Bokobza, executive vice president and chief marketing officer at Aldebaran Robotics in an interview with VentureBeat. “But we do believe he will be a good companion robot. They will be helpers in a different sense. They may remind you it’s your anniversary today.”


    Above: Nao
    Image Credit: Aldebaran Robotics

    Nao is a 58-centimeter tall robot that can be easily told what to do using an object-oriented program on a computer. Using the NAOqi middleware software, you can tell him how to use his sensors, motors, and brain. As such, the robot is a good way to introduce children to programming, Bokobza said. More sophisticated programmers can look at the underlying code and efficiently choreograph a bunch of complex tasks. Over time, Nao can evolve with upgraded software. The software is proprietary, but it is based on a version of Linux.

    Nao was first created in 2006. He’s a lot more sophisticated now, and he costs a lot less. You can ask him to do something and he’ll do it. You can ask him to teach multiplication tables to your kids, wake you up in the morning, monitor your home in the day, or teach you new things.

    “I have a child, and I think of Nao as providing a buffer memory for myself,” Bokobza said. “I travel a lot, and he may remind me of what my child is doing while I’m far away.”

    His body has 25 degrees of freedom, thanks to a bunch of electric motors and actuators. He has two cameras that capture video at 30 frames per second, four directional microphones, a sonar range finder, two infrared emitters and receivers, an inertial board, nine tactile sensors, and eight pressure sensors. Nao runs on an Intel Atom central processing unit (CPU) that operates at 1.6 gigahertz. There’s a second CPU in the torso. It has a 48.6-watt-hour battery that provides Nao with about 90 minutes to two hours of operation.

    His motion module uses inverse kinematics, which means he has good joint control, balance, and task priority. He has Wi-Fi and Ethernet connectivity.

    SoftBank acquired 78 percent of Aldebaran in 2012, and the company itself was founded in 2005. Over time, robots like Nao may be a fixture in every home, Bokobza said. There’s competition out there from the likes of Honda’s Asimo robot and Intel’s Jimmy the 21st Century Robot.

    “It’s becoming more and more accessible for the home,” she said.


    Above: Nao
    Image Credit: Alderbaran Robotic

    That's great that Nao can do Tai Chi, but I really want a robot that can open the fridge and get me a beer. Now that would be awesome.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    University Students Develop Robots Skilled in Tai Chi

    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    Guinness World Record Tai Chi Robots

    More than a thousand dancing robots break world record
    By Daniel Uria | Aug. 18, 2017 at 12:03 PM


    About 1,069 dancing robots completed a synchronized dancing routine to claim a Guinness World Record for "Most robots dancing simultaneously."Screen capture/Guinness World Record/YouTube

    Aug. 18 (UPI) -- More than a thousand robots performed a choreographed dance routine together to set a world record in China.

    The 1,069 "Dobi" robots, produced by WL Intelligent Technology Co. Ltd, completed the synchronized performance in Guangzhou, Guangdong, to claim the Guinness World Record for "Most robots dancing simultaneously."

    A few of the robots accidentally toppled over during the performance and were deducted from the final total.

    All of the robots were programmed via a singular group control system and are able to talk, do Tai Chi and perform several other actions in addition to dancing.

    WL Intelligent Technology topped the record of 1,007 dancing robots, previously held by fellow Chinese company Ever Win Company & Ltd.

    Which Colossal Death Robot are you? The Tai Chi Robots that set Martial Arts World Record?
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    46,302

    108 Chinese Kung Fu Robots Put on a Show



    Martial arts robots will start with Tai Chi...I'll get worried when they move on to hard styles.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •