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Thread: Jackie’s Charity work

  1. #46
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    Jackie's going in...

    ...with his disciples in tow.
    Jackie Chan Makes Charity Trip To Earthquake Victims In China
    April 20, 2010 by Tim Saunders

    Jackie Chan has made a charity trip to Qinghai, China, to bring supplies to victims of the devastating earthquake last week that has claimed over 1,484 lives and left over 12,000 injured.

    “I’m deeply grateful to China Eastern Airlines for providing an airbus A320 plane for us to ship our relief supplies, and giving us the green light to fly into the area so we could bring all the supplies in on time,” blogged the star. "Even though we didn’t take any personal luggage with us, the cargo compartment of the plane was filled with relief supplies yet we still couldn’t fit all the supplies onto the plane.

    “We knew that the disaster area were in desperate need of warm clothing and blankets. Before I boarded the plane today, a friend of mine sent over several bags of warm clothing but we couldn’t load it into the cargo compartment, so each of my disciples hand-carried two bags onto the plane.

    “Last year, the Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation had already made plans to allocate 20 million RMB towards the Serious Illness and Treatment Facility for Youth in Qinghai Province program. But now a disaster has struck in Yushu, so the foundation especially donated 3 million RMB (US$439,477) for the children injured in the earthquake. The foundation will also provide assistance to the area."

    To see photos of Jackie’s relief efforts, and read his full blog about the disaster, visit his official website.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #47
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    I thought she was into vampires

    Kristen Stewart Designs Coach Bag
    Shanghai : China | Apr 26, 2010

    The famed Twilight actress, Kristen StewartKristen Stewart, who just celebrated her 20th birthday, can now add purse designer to her list of credentials. The bag, featured above, is a smiley face with the word "yess" and Kristen's autograph in the corner.

    To celebrate the China opening of the luxury brand, Coach, Stewart contributed her piece of art that will be a part of the charity activity "Star Totes". Coach invited celebrities from around the world to contribute artistic creations on their handbags.

    Coach will open 15 stores in China this year. The brand is not popular in China so the help of "Star Totes" will boost the awareness of their new stores.

    Kristen Stewart's handbag will be auctioned on the internet with proceeds going to The Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation. The auction starts May 13th. Visit Coach China for more details.
    Did she scrawl on that with a pen? Star totes are odd.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #48
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    Back to the drought

    With all the news about the Shanghai Expo and stabbings, I forgot about the drought.
    Jackie Chan Brings Water To Drought Areas
    May 20, 2010 by Tim Saunders

    Earlier this month, Jackie Chan traveled to Tongren in the Guizhou province of China to bring much-needed water and supplies to the drought stricken area. He has now blogged about the experience.

    “Along with my team (The Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation), I flew to TongRen City, Guizhou Province in the Tujia County," writes Jackie in the blog. "We brought 48,000 bottles of water to their people. My team told me that the GDP is the lowest in the country and up in the mountains where the people lived, they were facing serious water shortages.

    “Along the way, I learned that the water was difficult to store and that 97% of the farmland were in the mountains. In the summer’s dry season, villagers have to walk 10 miles down the mountain just to collect two bottles of water. So in the car up to the mountain, I could see the roof of many houses, used as a reservoir for water. However, it was covered with moss and there was no filter. They used it to wash their clothes, their plates, and even to drink.”

    Jackie’s blog tells how he visited schools in the area, and personally delivered water to residents – something he will never forget.

    “After seeing how they drank water, I immediately donated 1 million RMB to the local government. Also, I donated money [for] the construction of 10KM of water pipes and a water tower. Now, 9,000 people in the village can drink clean water!”
    Gene Ching
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  4. #49
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    Ot

    wonder which films they were watching...
    Jackie Chan `honoured` Chilean miners watched his movies underground


    The Spy Next Door world Premiere, The Grove, Los Angeles, California. - Russ Einhorn / Splash News

    By Sophie Eager Oct 28, 2010, 19:24 GMT

    Actor Jackie Chan said he is 'honoured' that the Chilean miners were watching his movies while trapped underground.

    It has been reported that the 33 trapped miners had been watching Jackie Chan and Mr Bean movies to keep their spirits up during their 69-day underground ordeal, which ended earlier this month.

    Chan recently wrote on Twitter: 'I just heard good news from my American manager that the Chilean miners were watching some of my movies while they were going through some difficult times underground.

    'Wow, what an honor!'

    It was claimed psychologists carefully chose the movies that they were allowed to view underground and they watched them using a smart-phone-size video projector.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #50
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    Jackie Chan Children's Eye Center

    Now I'm starting to wonder exactly how many medical facilities are named after Jackie...
    China's First 'Jackie Chan Children's Eye Center' Set up at West China Hospital



    CHENGDU, China, Dec. 3, 2010 /PRNewswire-Asia/ -- The Hong Kong superstar Jackie Chan came to West China Hospital to unveil the "World Eye Organization Jackie Chan Children's Eye Centre of West China Hospital of Sichuan University". The founding of this centre should be attributed to the successful cooperation between the West China Hospital and World Eye Organization (WEO) on the "Welfare Programs for Blindness Prevention and Treatment", the proactive arrangements of relative parties and the great support extended by the famous Hong Kong film star Jackie Chan as well as the Chairman of the WEO Mr. Lin Wenjie. The Vice President of Sichuan University Mr. Bu Hong, Director of the West China Hospital Mr. Shi Yingkang, Vice Director Mr. Li Weimin and President of the WEO Mr. Lin Wenjie were also in attendance. The ceremony was presided over by Mr. Li Weimin.

    Mr. Bu Hong gave his speech on the ceremony and he stressed that as an important medical base deployed in west China, West China Hospital undertakes the sacred and critical mission to provide medical service for people in this wide region. West China Hospital had won an excellent reputation for its remarkable performance in the 5.12 Wenchuan earthquake and the Yushu earthquake. Speaking of the founding of this center, Mr.Bu quipped that as a big fan of Jackie Chan, he could see his idol not only on the screen but also from the sites where disasters had descended and rescue work was needed. He paid sincere respect to Jackie Chan's contribution to China's charity course. After more than 2 years of cooperation between West China Hospital and WEO, this center was finally built up and it would bring better treatment and a brighter future for children in west China especially for those in the earthquake-hit areas.

    Then, Jackie Chan, Mr. Bu Hong, Mr. Shi Yingkang and Mr. Lin Wenjie turned on the light-emitting crystal ball together with melodious music and the "World Eye Organization Jackie Chan Children's Eye Centre of West China Hospital of Sichuan University" was thus formally set up.

    SOURCE West China Hospital
    Gene Ching
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  6. #51
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    The Japan Tsunami

    Succumb not to sorrow - anyone got a vid? SPJ?
    Jackie Chan, Hong Kong stars to stage charity concert for Japan quake relief
    By Associated Press, Thursday, March 24, 9:21 AM

    HONG KONG — Jackie Chan and other Hong Kong stars will stage a charity concert on April 1 to raise funds for victims of Japan’s massive earthquake and tsunami.

    The veteran action star and dozens of Hong Kong singers and actors on Thursday recorded the theme song for the concert, “Succumb Not to Sorrow.” The song is based on an inspirational Japanese poem.

    Addressing the Japanese victims, Chan said, “You will not be alone. We will always be by your side.”

    Others attending the recording session include singers Alan Tam, Hacken Lee, Shirley Kwan and Chinese-American rapper Jin. TV stars Bosco Wong, Myloie Wu and Michael Tse also took part.

    Proceeds from the concert at Hong Kong’s Victoria Park will go to the Salvation Army.


    The Associated Press - Hong Kong actor Jackie Chan and other artists pose before a news conference for an upcoming charity event for the victims and survivors of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, in Hong Kong Thursday, March 24, 2011. The Hong Kong entertainment industry will organize the charity event to pay respects to the deceased, send condolences and love to those who lost loved ones and encourage the survivors of the disaster. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)
    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    Jackie for Japan Relief

    Jackie Chan Raises $3.3 Million in Three Hours for Japan Relief (Exclusive)
    5:16 PM 4/4/2011 by Karen Chu


    He estimates he has given out at least half of what he has earned throughout his career: “My goal is to have a $0 in my bank account the day I die.”

    HONG KONG — Help for the people of Japan suffering the effects of earthquake, tsunami and radioactive fallout was only a phone call away. It helped that Jackie Chan was on one end of the call.
    “When I picked up the phone and called my friends in the entertainment business in Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Singapore, right away, they all agreed to come over,” Chan said.

    The Hong Kong-born action superstar called in favors from across Asia for his disaster relief fund-raising concert, Artiste 311 Love Beyond Borders, which raked in more than HK$26 million ($3.3 million) — and counting — in donations in just three hours.

    The concert was held Friday, but the cash kept flowing the next night at Chan’s wrap dinner for the production team, where co-organizers Eric Tsang and John Shum toasted their crew and wound down. “I still have some of the cash donations that people gave me today in my pocket,” Chan told The Hollywood Reporter.

    Chan initiated the fund-raiser, held at the Victoria Park in Hong Kong, with longtime buddy Tsang, a film and TV multi-hyphenate who is always the first person Chan calls to kick off a disaster relief show, and John Shum, a veteran producer, director, actor, writer and political activist. The three organized the seven-hour Crossing Borders Fundraising Show for the Indian Ocean tsunami victims in January 2005 and the eight-hour Artistes 512 Fund Raising Campaign for those affected by the 2008 earthquake in Sichuan, China.

    “It’s got to be a record to raise so much in just three hours,” Chan said of the show, which was headlined by Chan; Tsang; actors Andy Lau and Donnie Yen; the Wonder Girls and singer-songwriter Park Jin-young from South Korea; and from Japan, singer Sen Masao, actor Masatoshi Nakamura, girl group AKB48 and Judy Ongg, who is the best-known Chinese singer in that nation.

    Even American Lionel Richie put in an appearance from Australia via satellite with a rendition of his “Say You, Say Me.”

    “I’ve known Lionel Richie for 16 or 17 years,” Chan said. “We’re great friends. He has written a song called ‘One World’ for me.”

    Chan rang up Richie during dinner to affectionately thank him.

    “The only reason we couldn’t do a longer show is because of the venue,” Chan said. “We didn’t want to put on the show on April Fools’ Day, but with everyone’s schedules and the venue, we’d rather go ahead for April 1.”

    Chan said organizers put the show together in only 11 days.

    Chan has a long relationship with Japan, having established his enormous popularity in the early 1980s. The disasters that shook the country had a personal dimension for the actor, too. “Forty of my Japanese fans are now missing; my fan club there is trying their best to find them and keep me posted,” Chan said.
    “Earthquakes have struck Japan many, many times before. But what shocked me was the tsunami, especially when we saw all the videos of strong waves hitting the towns. Then there was the nuclear crisis. Even when we wanted to help, we didn’t know where to start. After the Sichuan earthquake in China, I chartered planes to deliver provisions to the affected population, but this time, there was no road to reach the disaster-struck areas.”

    The fund-raiser took place three weeks after the disaster, which some deemed too late a response. Said Chan: “Japan is a developed, wealthy nation and has all kinds of resources and experience for disaster relief. We tried to wait and see what we could do to help, but the situation just got worse and worse. For years, my Japanese fans have made a great effort to raise money for my charity, to build schools in China and to help the victims of the Sichuan earthquake. It’s time for me to return the favor and do what we can to help.”

    To Chan, the most difficult part of organizing the event was the overwhelming number of willing participants. “There are just too many performers,” he said. “The production team consists of fewer than 40 people, but 300 performers showed up. Almost everyone from Japan that we asked agreed to come over. But then we had to ask ourselves, what role could they play? What should they perform? Because, you know, every guest means a plane ticket, a hotel room, each for the guest and their assistants.”

    Chan paid for the plane tickets and accommodations for all the overseas performers and their assistants and contributed nearly HK$5 million ($643,000).

    All proceeds from the concert, minus expenses, will be passed on to the Salvation Army, which will deliver emergency relief packs to people in the affected areas. The $60 packs include a 15-day supply of food and water, personal care and hygiene products and blankets.

    For all his physical comedies and international celebrity, Chan is also a philanthropist. He established his Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation in 1988 in Hong Kong and has since set up branches in China and Hawaii. In 2004, he set up Dragon’s Heart Foundation expressly for the children in China. Through his charitable foundations, he has raised and donated millions to such diverse efforts as the aid for the disaster victims in Haiti, emergency assistance in Japan, orphans in South Korea and schools in China.

    The energetic star estimates that he has given out at least half of what he had earned throughout his career. “I guess more than HK$100 million ($12.8 million), but not as much as $100 million,” he said. Now he tries to match what the foundations raise. “It’d be more substantial if I can match the sum,” he said. “The worst thing would be to ask others to give but not give yourself.”

    “My goal is to have a $0 in my bank account the day I die,” the 56-year-old Chan said with a shrug. “I get very happy when I think about that, no more worries. I buy the things I like, I give money to charity, and then I try to make more money. I’ll be frank with you: It’s not difficult for me to make money. If it’s easy, why shouldn’t I give it away?”
    That's real kung fu. Jackie rocks.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #53
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    In Forbes no less

    Good ol' Jackie. He remains an inspiration.
    Heroes Of Philanthropy
    Jackie Chan: Philanthropy's Hardest Working Man
    Ron Gluckman, 06.22.11, 06:00 PM EDT
    Forbes Asia Magazine dated July 18, 2011
    Hong Kong star Jackie Chan races around Asia to brighten a sick child's day or help disaster victims.

    Another long day is nearly over, and Hong Kong action star Jackie Chan is beat. And no wonder: The day before, he made an overnight dash to Beijing, carrying a torch in a run to promote the upcoming World University Games in Guangzhou. Landing in Hong Kong he rushes straight to a series of photo shoots, appearances and dubbing duties for Kung Fu Panda 2. Rubbing his eyes, it's clear he needs a break. But he still has one more appointment, this time with a special opponent.

    Dayne Nourse flew in from Salt Lake City in the U.S. to show Chan his moves. He hardly looks like a formidable foe, especially to anyone with Chan's kung fu skills. However, Hong Kong's top hero has a weakness for such adversaries. Nourse, 14, stands waist-high, when he stands. Mostly, he sits in a wheelchair, crippled by brittle bone disease. The Make-A-Wish Foundation flew him to Hong Kong. Meeting idol Jackie Chan is his final wish.

    The ultimate pro, Chan responds with a performance that has all eyes misting up at a Chinese dinner he hosts for Nourse and another Make-A-Wish teen, Keisha Knauss, at a west Kowloon restaurant. Chan makes silly faces and flirts with Knauss, then teaches kung fu moves to Nourse. "He's really cool," Nourse gushes afterward. "I knew he was nice from his films, but I had no idea how nice he would be. This has really been a dream come true."

    At the banquet filled with friends, Chan bounces from table to table, the perfect host. But he dotes on the teens. Knauss calls him "my boyfriend" to much laughter, but for one special day he really is. Earlier Chan took the teens around his Clearwater Bay film studio, showered them with souvenirs and demonstrated daring stunts. "I know how important this moment is," he confides during a moment away from the youngsters. "If I can help them to live two more days, or two more years, whatever it takes. This is what makes me happy."

    Chan, 57, punched his way to fame in scores of cheap sock 'em flicks through the 1970s in Hong Kong before becoming the city's first Hollywood star in the 1990s. Today he's more than an entertainment juggernaut with more than a hundred films, television and cartoon shows, and record albums to his credit. In a city obsessed with commerce, where billionaires are celebrities, this grade school dropout is a Hong Kong icon. In earlier times it was hard to walk a block without seeing his face on a poster or product advertisement. The same now holds true in the rest of China, where he's often on hand opening cinemas, hosting variety shows and making appearances.

    Unlike so many pretty boys in the Hong Kong industry, which was the biggest in the world after Hollywood until the 1990s, Chan rose from rags to riches and did it his own way--performing death-defying stunts himself. As a global star with international hits such as Rush Hour, he claimed fees of up to $25 million a picture. More important, he altered the formulaic way Hong Kong made and marketed films. "Jackie Chan helped create the Golden Age of Hong Kong cinema in the 1980s and subsequently was part of the Hong Kong talent that succeeded in Hollywood and international cinema," says Roger Garcia, executive director of the Hong Kong International Film Festival. "He helped shape how the world today looks at Hong Kong movies."

    Some critics term his films trivial, panning Chan's cheesy mix of comedy, action and positive themes. Yet the blend has proven box office appeal; his fans span the globe and defy categorization. In December his Facebook page topped 10 million fans. Even critics concede that he injected life into Asian action films with his martial arts mastery.

    Along the way Chan has been transformed from stuntman and fighter to unlikely leading man and role model. However slapstick the script, his films usually have strong moral messages. He often defends underdogs or urchins. Invariably his movies are clean-cut, without sex scenes or graphic violence--call it Kung Fu Disney ( DIS - news - people ) with Confucian characteristics.

    What is less known is how fame has transformed Chan into one of Asia's premier philanthropists. Others may give more or get more attention, but probably nobody works harder for more causes than Chan. "Every time we ask him to do an event, he agrees without any question," says Anthony Lau, director of the Hong Kong Tourism Board. Chan has been the face of everything from no-smoking campaigns to cleanup efforts. Lau recalls requesting the star's appearance in Japan two years ago. Chan was working in remote China but flew 30 hours straight to the event. "The next day, he made the journey back--another 30 hours."
    Gene Ching
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    continued from previous

    Chan has always regretted his lack of a formal education. So when he launched the Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation in 1988, it offered scholarships and other help to young people. Over the years the scope has broadened to include medical services, help for the poor and quick responses to natural disasters. After China's Sichuan earthquake he donated more than $1.3 million to relief. His impact is multiplied when he lends his name and puts his boundless energy behind a cause.

    Two days before meeting the U.S. teens, as FORBES ASIA trails the hyperkinetic Chan around Hong Kong, he bounds up several flights of an old apartment building, bursting into a room of photographers. Flashes pulsate as he poses with a giant cardboard check for around $3.4 million. This was raised in a concert he organized to help victims of the Japan quake and tsunami. He put up $150,000 of his own money.

    Twenty minutes later we are back in a car, Chan behind the wheel. "I love driving," he says, zipping in and out of Hong Kong traffic, jabbering at every stoplight into a pair of phones--one for China, one for Hong Kong--before pulling into the driveway of his Kowloon Tong home. There are two old houses, side by side in a huge lot framed by giant thickets of bamboo. Jackie lives in one with his wife; his son, Jaycee Chan, also an actor and musician, lives in the other.

    This is an unscheduled stop in a day crammed with appointments. Chan is a ball of energy but easily distracted, making a shambles of any itinerary. Our meetings have been repeatedly rescheduled, month after month. Staff members say he's a reluctant delegator who tries to do everything himself. Even so, they are intensely loyal and talk lovingly of their good-natured boss. Practically all have been with him for years, some for decades. "He wants to be on top of everything," says Mabel Cheung, one of Hong Kong's most respected film directors, who made Traces of a Dragon: Jackie Chan and His Lost Family.

    A dozen years ago Chan learned that both his parents had previously been married and had abandoned families in the mainland amid the chaos of the Chinese civil war. Cheung took a film crew to China and interviewed his half-siblings and then went to Australia and filmed him talking to his parents about their past. She says he is a joy to work with. "He followed my direction and never asked to change a single thing. He never even came into the editing room."

    Unlike most Hong Kong stars, Chan travels under his own power, eschewing big entourages. We often leave a car in a lot--Chan parking himself--then ride an escalator and hustle to a meeting or meal. Maybe because he's dressed down and lacks bodyguards, hardly anyone seems to notice. When they do, smiles invariably bloom. Everyone seems to cherish Jackie Chan. "Even as an international star, he's very much a Hong Kong person," notes Cheung. "He really acts like a big brother to everyone in the film industry in Hong Kong. He always has gatherings for his friends, in his house."

    His superstardom and simplicity seem surprising in a city so consumed by flash and showiness. But his boisterous can-do spirit is the essence of Hong Kong. "I think Jackie Chan is one of the reasons people come here," says Lau. "They know him and his attitude, and that says a lot about Hong Kong."

    His wealth has been pegged at $130 million, but he's happy to eat a bowl of dumplings set on a folding card table outside his house. The furnishings are modest. On a wall is a plastic decoration often seen in dentist offices, a kind of clock-shaped mingling of the words: "Live, Learn, Laugh, Love, Life."

    Chan wears old sneakers and ripped jeans and seems uninterested in possessions or attention-grabbing statements. His yard does host a collection of cars, including a vintage Rolls-Royce ( RYCEY.PK - news - people ). One has the license "123," which cost him $150,000. He says he's been offered six times that amount to sell the plates in numbers-obsessed Hong Kong. "But I'll never sell." The plate, he says, denotes the date, Dec. 3, his son was born. He also shares the property with a pair of Golden Retrievers--Jones and JJ. His wife of nearly 30 years is Taiwanese former actress Lin Feng-Jiao, or Joan. "It makes it easy--we're all Js," he says with that moon-size smile.

    Chan spent his early years atop Victoria Peak, Hong Kong's most prestigious address, but his was never the life of privilege. His father worked as a cook at the French consulate; his mother did laundry. He lasted less than a year in school. Instead, when his father moved to another job, with the American embassy in Australia, Chan was enrolled in the China Drama Academy in Kowloon, a Peking Opera school run by Master Yu Jim-Yuen. He proved a superlative student of acrobatics and martial arts; he started working in films at age 8.

    Chan admits he didn't take to charity at first. "When I started, people were always asking me to do stuff, and I was just too busy, so I always said no," he says. "Then I finally agreed. I remember being so embarrassed. Kids came up to me and asked what I brought them, and I didn't know. I hadn't done it. Somebody else did it for me. They all thanked me, and I was shamed." That was 25 years ago.

    At nearly the same time Chan was in Yugoslavia, filming a dangerous stunt. He's listed in record books for doing the toughest stunts and has taken numerous tumbles, breaking most bones in his body. On this day he took a near fatal drop on his head. "It was one of the first times in my life where I started thinking, what have I really done, for myself, for my country, for society? I thought, if I recover I have to do more for everyone."

    In 2004 he started his second foundation, the Dragon's Heart Foundation, which builds schools and helps children and the elderly in remote parts of China. One of his cleverest schemes for this foundation has been to enlist kids from around the world to contribute, and he matches all funds. But the global bond is far more important than the folded dollars that flow in. "I want to show you something superspecial," he says at his Clearwater Bay studio. One hallway is crammed with photographs signed by celebrity pals: Robert De Niro, Kevin Costner, Madonna, as well as Tiger Woods, James Brown and a Miss World or two. On the other wall are movie posters and trophies.

    But Chan guides me inside to his real treasures. "Look at this," he says, pulling out a stack of poster boards filled with crayon coloring and collages, many featuring dollar bills. These are donations from kids all over the world. Some put together classroom projects, others went door-to-door or emptied their cookie jars. "Now I have to double everything," he says. "There is no way I'd ever spend any of this. Someday, I'll have a museum and hang this on the walls."

    Chan talks of cinemas in China. He's about to debut his epic, 1911, covering 100 years of Chinese history; the patriotic flick is his 100th. He's recently opened China's biggest Cineplex, with 17 screens, in Beijing and has plans for dozens more. He has his own line of clothing and Jackie Chan cafes and gyms. There are so many business ventures, he cannot keep track. When he's on the phone I explore the studio and spot several Segways. Sure enough, he has a distributorship.

    A philanthropic pioneer among Hong Kong entertainers, Chan sets an example for stars such as Jet Li who have launched charities. It's easy to understand why he works so hard. "When I was a child, I was very poor and wanted everything. So when I got money I began buying things. Now I want to give away everything. When I give somebody something and see their face, it just makes me so happy."

    Chan believes giving will catch on in China, too. Bill Gates and Warren Buffett received a cold response when they visited to solicit support for a global campaign to get tycoons to pledge half their estates to charity after their death. Chan has taken the pledge. "China is an old country, but people are just starting to get money," he says. "I think they will follow the same path; it's just starting." (Malaysia's Vincent Tan has also taken the pledge. See list, following pages.)

    In the homespun wisdom of Jackie Chan, the way forward is simple. "I do small things. I try to do good things every day. If everyone does some good, think of what a good world this will be."
    We discussed Traces of a Dragon here.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #55
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    Operation Smile

    There's an interview vid - follow the link. Jackie answers that 'Bruce Lee' question for the bazillionth time and the vid cuts right at what might have been a good question.
    Charity work of Kungfu icon Jackie Chan
    CNTV, August 11, 2011


    The Ambassador of Operation Smile, Kungfu superstar Jackie Chan sat down to talk about his charity work, and about his comedic, yet death-defying kung-fu style.

    Jackie Chan has been acting since the 1960s and has appeared in over 100 films. Chan is recognized with his signature improvised comedic Kungfu. Everything around him could become a weapon. Performing all of his own stunts, the 57-year-old holds the Guinness World Record for "Most Stunts By a Living Actor."

    Jackie Chan is a keen philanthropist and a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, having worked tirelessly to champion charitable causes. He has campaigned for energy conservation, against animal abuse, and has promoted disaster relief efforts in times of flood, earthquake and tsunami. Chan has three wishes, world peace, Confucian harmony among all people, and no poverty in China. He strongly believes all his dreams will finally come true because of the power of dreams.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #56
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    RM 055 JC tourbillon

    Watchmaker Richard Mille Creates a Timepiece for Jackie Chan
    4:59 PM PDT 8/15/2011 by Lindsay Flans


    Mille’s unique watch will be auctioned in September to benefit Chan’s charity, Dragon’s Heart Foundation.

    Upscale watchmaker Richard Mille has designed a unique timepiece in support of Jackie Chan’s Dragon’s Heart Foundation.

    Dragon’s Heart was founded in 2004 by the Rush Hour actor, to help children and the elderly in poor and remote areas of China, by building schools and aiding the handicapped. Mille—a longtime friend of the actor—created a special RM 055 JC tourbillon for the charitable group. In April, Chan attended the opening of a new Richard Mille store in Shanghai.

    The white gold timepiece with a white rubber strap includes the charity’s logo—representing Chan holding the hands of two children—placed at the heart of the movement. The words "Foundation Jackie Chan" are written on the back of the watch along with the actor’s emblem: a stamped dragon. The RM 055 JC features a manual winding tourbillon with hours, minutes, power reserve indicator (circa 70h), torque indicator and function selector. Similiar tourbillon styles sell for upwards of $300,000.

    The Mille design will be on sale at a benefit auction September 14, in Beijing.
    Now you all know what to get me for Xmas.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #57
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    1.1 mill for primary schools

    Jackie Chan Holds Charity Concert, Raising $1.1 mln
    2011-11-14 08:41:06 xinhua


    Actor Jackie Chan (2nd R) performs during a charity concert in Wuhan, capital of central China's Hubei Province, Nov. 12, 2011. More than 7 million yuan (1.1 million US dollars) have been raised during Chan's charity concert, held in Wuhan on Saturday, before the establishment of primary schools in China's poorer mountainous areas. [Photo: Xinhua]
    Two more pix if you follow the link.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  13. #58
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    BEP & Jackie in Beijing

    I hope they sing together.
    Will.i.am to Headline Beijing Education Concert
    11:45 PM PST 11/21/2011 by THR Staff

    The show is being organized in cooperation with the Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation Beijing.

    Black Eyed Peas' singer will.i.am and bandmate apl.de.ap, John Legend and the Bucky Johnson band at a Beijing concert Dec. 17 designed to encourage study abroad programs in China, the musicians announced Monday in Los Angeles.

    The concert, which supports the U.S. State Department's 100,000 Strong Initiative to send that many American students to study in China, may see an appearance by martial arts actor and sometime-singer Jackie Chan, whose Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation Beijing is co-organizing the show. Monday's announcement mentioned the participation of "other prominent Chinese and U.S. artists," but only named the Peas' members, Legend and Bucky Johnson. No venue was specified, although one of Beijing's former Olympic venues could play host. Tickets were not on sale in Beijing as of Tuesday afternoon local time. The Black Eyed Peas have performed as a unit twice previously in the Chinese capital city.

    Charity concerts have a rocky history in Beijing when not organized directly by the Chinese government. The Show of Peace concert, which was to feature Led Zeppelin's Jimmy Page and Aerosmith's Joe Perry, was first postponed from April 2010 and then canceled. Other recent canceled Beijing concerts by major artists include a March 2009 show by Oasis, due to a prior Noel Gallagher appearance at a pro-Tibetan independence gig, and an Oct. 2008 performance by Linkin Park, due to injury to singer Chester Bennington.

    In Beijing, the concert is being co-organized by Americans Promoting Study Abroad, which provides scholarships to inner city students. It is supported by both the U.S. State Department and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  14. #59
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    LA & Beijing

    Related to above.
    Los Angeles to promote educational exchange with China
    English.news.cn 2011-12-05 19:44:32

    BEIJING, Dec. 5 (Xinhua) -- The city of Los Angeles will establish partnerships with charitable foundations to promote educational exchanges between China and the U.S., announced the mayor of Los Angeles at a press conference Monday.

    Mayor Antonio R. Villaraigosa said the program, the "100K Strong Initiative," will help more students from Los Angeles-area high schools in underserved communities study in China.

    "Our two great nations have the opportunity now to work together to build a brighter future, and the understanding and friendship between us will be crucial to making that dream a reality," he said.

    The city will cooperate with Americans Promoting Study Abroad (APSA) and the Jackie Chan Charitable Foundation, Beijing, to provide study opportunities in China for the students.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  15. #60
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    Save the Date!

    A WILD NIGHT to Benefit WILDAID with JACKIE CHAN
    WILDAID is presenting the WILDAID Ambassador Award for his dedication and service to WILDAID and global endangered species. Visit wildaid.org/night for details. Use code "Kung Fu" for a special $25 discount. A TIGER CLAW FOUNDATION SPONSORED EVENT We cordially invite you to join the workshops. Please call local sponsors for details. For other info please email cpong@goTaiji.com or call C.P.Ong, 301-299-8116.
    For more information, contact: Erin Sullivan
    Phone: 415-834-3174
    Event Address: 744 Montgomery Street #300
    San Francisco, CA, 94111 USA
    Online: Sullivan@wildaid.org - www.wildaid.org/night
    For more info on WildAid, see WildAid Tiger Claw Champion
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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