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Thread: Hi; Moon we are back!!!

  1. #1

    Hi; Moon we are back!!!

    http://www.space.com/news/ap_060126_russia_moon.html

    http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,61905-0.html

    http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,61915-0.html

    http://www.astronautix.com/craft/chirbase.htm

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4177064.stm

    there is a Chinese legend.

    Hou Yi shot down 8 or 9 sun's.

    Chang Er ate the never old never perish tablet and flew to the moon.

    The moon palace is called widespread coldness or Guan Han Gong.

    there is also a jade bunny rabbit.

    --

    fairy Chang will not be alone for too long.

    lots of companies coming your way.

    Last edited by SPJ; 01-14-2007 at 10:52 AM.

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Last edited by SPJ; 01-14-2007 at 11:06 AM.

  4. #4
    I think the question is not about money or technology.

    the space ethics Q would be that should we visit or habitate and mine the moon or another planet?

    or even move to live on another star as colonies?

    ---


  5. #5
    I always wonder what it would be like to practice Tai Chi or Long fist on the moon.

    It was my childhood quest in the late 60's.

    SO I was among the millions' other watching neil armstrong to step on the moon live on a TV.

    "I wonder what it would be like to practice Tai Chi on the moon".

    If there is a chance by 2015, I may visit the moon.

    my life long quest is completed.

    --

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tpPPVvm9WAU

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5QX3m...elated&search=

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YT_TyqPFJoA&NR

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcFT56tZ6L4&NR

    Last edited by SPJ; 01-15-2007 at 12:17 PM.

  6. #6
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    it takes 5 days to get there. imagine th cost of a ticket
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycho Mantis View Post
    Genes too busy rocking the gang and scarfing down bags of cheetos while beating it to nacho ninjettes and laughing at the ridiculous posts on the kfforum. In a horse stance of course.

  7. #7
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    hmmmmn...we can't resolve our own problems here with any amount of civility and we want to spread out into the galaxy...starting with the moon....


    Einstein was right was right when he said: "There are two things that are infinite, the universe, and human stupidity and I'm not sure about the former".

    Kung Fu is good for you.

  8. #8
    I think I was and still am very romantic about the moon thing.

    If we can do it on the moon then the next "adventure" will be mars etc.

    My bro said that why all the fuss. The moon is only a ice cold rock smattered by million's meteors.

    we do so much better on the planet earth.

    --


  9. #9
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    well there is the whole matter of breathing and what not...planting vegetables, you know, that sort of thing.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  10. #10
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    Supermoon!

    It'll be the flower moon and Cinco de Mayo (a day for nachos!)

    May 2, 2012
    The Biggest Supermoon in Years is Coming Saturday Night

    This Saturday evening, take a look at the night sky and you might see something special. The moon will make its largest, most stunning appearance of the year—an event known to scientists as “the perigee-syzygy of the Earth-Moon-Sun system” and to the popular skywatching public simply as the “supermoon.” As one of the most spectacular supermoons in years, the moon will appear 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than when it is on the far side of its orbit.

    Why does the moon sometimes appear larger, and sometimes smaller? The answer lies in the fact that its orbit around Earth is elliptical, so its distance from us varies—it ranges from roughly 222,000 to 252,000 miles away each month. On Saturday, the moon will reach what is known as the perigee, coming as close as it ever does to the Earth, just 221,802 miles away. At the same time, it will be a full moon, with the entirety of its Earth-facing surface illuminated by the light of the sun.

    This supermoon will appear especially large because the exact moment of perigee will neatly coincide with the appearance of a perfectly full moon. The full moon will occur at 11:34 p.m. EST, and the perigee will occur at 11:35. During last year’s supermoon on March 19, 2011, for comparison, the perigee and full moon were 50 minutes apart.

    “The timing is almost perfect,” says NASA, according to the Washington Post. AccuWeather’s astronomy blogger Daniel Vogler notes that a look through recent data reveals no more closely-timed (and therefore bigger) supermoons.

    Apart from providing a sight to behold in the night sky, the moon’s perigee also has a tangible effect on Earth: It causes higher than normal tides. Because tides are driven by the moon’s gravitational effects, a closer moon means that the oceans will be pulled more than usual towards the satellite. In most places, this will mean a tide that is an inch or so higher than usual, but geographical factors can multiply the effect up to around six inches.

    There has long been speculation that the moon’s gravitational effect during its perigee could be the cause of natural disasters, including earthquakes and volcanic activity. In particular, many suggested this link following the earthquake and subsequent tsunami off the coast of Japan in March of 2011. However, the devastating quake occurred over a week before the supermoon, and studies have shown no strong evidence for increased frequency of high-intensity seismic activity during the moon’s perigee.

    There are more concrete examples, though, in which supermoons may cause problems. In particular, flooding during storms may be made more severe because of the higher tides. In 1962, the coincidental arrival of a powerful storm with the moon’s perigee inundated the entire Atlantic coast of Cape Cod, causing 40 deaths and $500 million in property damage.

    On Saturday, assuming no damaging storms or floods are at your doorstep, just hope for a clear night and take a look outside. The moon will appear larger and brighter than usual all night, but for the most striking views, try to catch it just after it rises above the horizon, when an optical illusion causes it to look larger than it really is, and viewing it through the gases of the earth’s atmosphere can cause the moon to appear yellow, orange or red in color.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #11
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    Blood Moon

    So tempted to make an indie Blood Moon thread, just because I love the title 'Blood Moon'

    Blood moon will bring about the end of the world on FRIDAY, claim Doomsdayers
    Biblical prophecy suggests the end of the world is just days away - doomsday preachers have claimed
    By Grace Witherden
    12:25, 22 JUL 2018 UPDATED 12:08, 26 JUL 2018

    On Friday, a blood moon is set to light up the sky with an orange glow - but some believe this could be the end of the world.

    Doomsday preachers insist some sort of tragic event is set to hit the earth and possibly wipe it out on Friday after the blood moon.

    The blood moon prophecy purports to reveal hidden messages in the Christian Bible about the end times approaching.

    Christian ministers John Hagee and Mark Biltz first made the theory which suggests the ongoing 'tetrad' - four consecutive lunary eclipses, is the indicator of the end of earth as described in the Bible in Acts 2:20 and Revelation 6:12.


    Experts have dismissed the blood moon prophecy as myth (Image: REUTERS)

    The first eclipse in the prophesied tetrad took place on April 15, 2014, and was followed by Blood Moons on October 8, 2014, April 4, 2015 and September 28, 2015.

    On Friday the total lunar eclipse - when the moon passes behind Earth and into its shadow - will last one hour and 43 minutes.

    The "blood moon" theory is interpreted from the Book of Joel, which says: "The sun will turn into darkness, and the moon into blood, before the great and terrible day of the Lord comes."

    A similar passage in the Book of Revelations reads: "And I beheld when he had opened the sixth seal, and, lo, there was a great earthquake; and the sun became black as sackcloth of hair, and the moon became as blood."


    The lunar eclipse will last for almost two hours (Image: Paul Gillis / SWNS.com)

    But the prophecy has been routinely dismissed by astronomers and other experts as nonsense.

    Scientists say the red tinge is due to Rayleigh scattering of sunlight through the Earth's atmosphere.

    It also causes the reddening of the sun at sunset.


    The eclipse will create a red glow in the sky (Image: Splash News)


    A supermoon rises behind St. Paul's Cathedral in January (Image: Getty Images Europe)

    Endtime Ministries' Irvin Baxter, who has made a number of spectacularly inaccurate predictions since the mid-1980s, is among those who point to passages in the Book of Joel

    He has said: "The Bible teaches that end event is coming just ahead of us now and that will be the greatest prophetic fulfilment in the last 2,000 years."

    Even though the myth has been debunked, YouTube is full of videos from doomsdayers predicting the end of the world in just a few days time.
    THREADS:
    Hi; Moon we are back!!!
    The Apocalypse is Upon Us
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    Super Blood Moon JAN 21 2019

    And on a Monday. A 'moon' day. How appropo.
    SUPERMOON AND TOTAL LUNAR ECLIPSE ‘BLOOD MOON’ TO COINCIDE IN RARE CELESTIAL EVENT
    BY HANNAH OSBORNE ON 12/1/18 AT 5:00 AM

    A supermoon is set to coincide with a total lunar eclipse in January—and the rare event will be visible across the U.S.

    This is the only total lunar eclipse—also known as a blood moon—of 2019. The last one was on July 27 of this year, and there won’t be another until 2021.

    Total lunar eclipses are when the Earth is directly between the Sun and the Moon. This means the Moon is lying in the shadow of Earth. “During a total lunar eclipse, the Moon usually turns a deep, dark red because it is illuminated by light that has passed through the Earth's atmosphere and has been bent back towards the Moon by refraction,” the U.K.’s Royal Museums Greenwich explains. “Dust in the atmosphere blocks out the higher frequency blue light waves, but the longer wavelength of red light comes through.”

    The total lunar eclipse, which takes place in the early hours of January 21, is special as it will also be a “supermoon”—a phenomenon where a full moon coincides with its closest approach to Earth, known as the perigee. This makes the Moon appear bigger than normal.

    These two events mean stargazers in January will see a “super blood moon.” There was another super blood moon in January 2018. In an interview with Time in July, NASA planetary scientist Rick Elphic said it was unusual to have a total solar eclipse and supermoon fall so closely together: “It’s usually years between lunar eclipses that have supermoons in them,” he told the magazine. “We just happen to be in a seasonal cycle where last year there was one and then this year, there is one and I don’t think there will be another supermoon eclipse for a while.”


    A super blood moon viewed from Istanbul, Turkey.
    CHRIS MCGRATH/GETTY IMAGES

    According to timeanddate.com, the total lunar eclipse will be visible from North and South America and western parts of Europe and Africa.

    Elphic said the best way to see the eclipse is through binoculars: “Telescopes can be useful but overpowering; if you’re using a telescope, you get a close-up view of the moon, but it’s really a much more dramatic thing to see against the night sky with binoculars. That’s your best bet.”

    January’s full moon is also known as the Full Wolf Moon, according to The Old Farmer’s Alama. This name as given by Native American and early Colonials as wolves would howl outside villages at night from hunger.

    January will be the first of three supermoons. The next two will take place on February 19 and March 21, with February’s being the largest and closest of the trio.

    This article has been updated to include more details of the time and date of the total lunar eclipse.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #13
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    Chang’e-4

    This weekend, China embarks on a historic mission to land on the far side of the Moon
    If successful, it will be a world’s first
    By Loren Grush@lorengrush Dec 6, 2018, 2:39pm EST


    The far side of the Moon as seen from Apollo 16 Image: NASA

    Early Saturday morning in China, a rocket will launch, carrying a lander and a rover bound for the Moon. It will mark the beginning of China’s ambitious lunar mission known as Chang’e-4, which will attempt to land spacecraft on the Moon’s far side — the region that always faces away from Earth. No other nation has ever attempted such a feat — which means the mission could catapult China into spaceflight history.

    So far, China is among an elite group of three countries that have landed a spacecraft softly on the surface of the Moon. Apart from America’s notable Apollo missions, the former Soviet Union also landed robotic spacecraft on the lunar surface, with the last mission occurring in 1976. In 2013, China entered the fray, putting a lander and a rover on the Moon. That mission, known as Chang’e-3, was part of a decades-long campaign that China devised to study the Moon with robotic spacecraft. Prior to Chang’e-3, the country had put a spacecraft in lunar orbit and had also crashed a vehicle into the lunar dirt. Now, the next step is to visit a part of the Moon that’s never been fully explored.

    LANDING ON THE FAR SIDE OF THE MOON IS AN INCREDIBLY CHALLENGING TASK

    It’s a significant step because landing on the far side of the Moon is an incredibly challenging task. The Moon is tidally locked with Earth, meaning it rotates around its axis at about the same time it takes to complete one full orbit around our planet. The result: we only see one half of the Moon at all times. This near side of the Moon is the only region that we’ve landed on gently, because there’s a direct line of sight with Earth, enabling easier communication with ground control. To land on the far side of the Moon, you must have multiple spacecraft working in tandem. In addition to the lander itself, you need some kind of probe near the Moon that can relay communications from your lander to Earth.

    And that’s exactly what China has. In May, the China National Space Administration launched a satellite called Queqiao, specifically for the purpose of aiding with communications for the upcoming Chang’e-4 mission. After about a month in space, Queqiao settled into a spot facing the far side of the Moon, more than 37,000 miles away from the lunar surface. The satellite is doing circles around a point in space known as the second Earth-Moon Lagrange point. It’s a place akin to a parking spot for spacecraft. At a Lagrange point, the gravitational forces of two bodies (stars, planets, etc) equal out in such a way that a spacecraft stays put in relation to the two entities. At this particular Lagrange point, Queqiao will stay facing the far side of the Moon, allowing communication between the spacecraft and Earth using a large curved antenna.

    “Demonstrating that you can communicate and perform roving on the lunar far side using a relay satellite is going to be quite a technological feat, and it’s going to bring a lot of prestige,” Andrew Jones, a freelance journalist covering China’s spaceflight program, tells The Verge.


    A Long March-4C rocket lifts off from the southwestern Xichang launch center carrying the Queqiao (“Magpie Bridge”) satellite in Xichang, China’s southwestern Sichuan province on May 21st, 2018. Photo by AFP/Getty Images

    If it all works, China will be getting an up-close view of one of the most tantalizing areas of the lunar surface: the South Pole-Aitken basin. It’s believed that the Chang’e-4 lander and rover will touch down in the Von Kármán crater inside this region, according to Jones, though the exact landing site hasn’t been confirmed. The South Pole-Aitken basin is a large impact crater on the far side of the Moon that’s roughly 1,550 miles in diameter and 7.5 miles deep. It’s thought to be one of the oldest impact sites on the lunar surface, but we don’t know exactly how old it is — and its true age could tell scientists a lot about the early Solar System.

    “THE SOUTH POLE-AITKEN BASIN IS EXCEEDINGLY IMPORTANT.”

    Most of the craters on the Moon are thought to have formed around 3.9 billion years ago, based on analysis of the lunar rocks collected during NASA’s Apollo missions. Many scientists think these holes occurred during a period of the Solar System known as the Late Heavy Bombardment — a period when a huge number of asteroids smacked into the inner planets. It’s thought this time occurred after most of the planets in our cosmic neighborhood had formed, which is why it’s considered “late” in our Solar System’s development. If the South Pole-Aitken basin is also 3.9 billion years old, it supports the idea that this bombardment happened. If it’s much older than that, it puts a dent in that theory. “This actually helps us understand not just about the Moon, but the whole Solar System,” Clive Neal, an engineering professor at the University of Notre Dame and emeritus chair of the Lunar Exploration Analysis Group, or LEAG, tells The Verge. “That’s why it’s important; it’s bigger than the Moon.”

    Because of its potential to tell us about our history, the South Pole-Aitken basin has long been a priority target of study. Scientists have proposed sending spacecraft to this region in order to collect samples and return them to Earth for in-depth analysis. “The South Pole-Aitken basin is exceedingly important, and we still haven’t done it because it’s too difficult,” says Neal.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  14. #14
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    Continued from previous post


    The South Pole-Aitken basin on the Moon Image: NASA/GSFC/University of Arizona

    Unfortunately, Chang’e-4 won’t be returning anything to Earth, so it probably won’t be able to tell us the exact age of the basin. But it should learn a few interesting tidbits. The Chang’e-4 rover will be carrying ground-penetrating radar to figure out what the structure of the Moon is like underneath the surface of the basin, which could tell us more about how this area formed. It will also have an instrument designed to figure out what the surface is made of in this region. And it’s carrying a Swedish instrument designed to figure out how particles streaming from the Sun interact with the lunar rocks.

    Meanwhile, the lander, which is tasked with carrying the rover to the Moon’s surface, will also be doing science from its landing spot, taking advantage of its location on the Moon. Since these vehicles will be on the Moon’s far side, they’ll be shielded from much of the electromagnetic interference from Earth and don’t have to deal with our planet’s atmosphere. The lander will be studying the space environment and the Universe in low frequencies — something we can’t do from our planet.

    “CHANG’E-4 IS A FIRST STEP, AND I’M SURE IT WILL RAISE MORE QUESTIONS THAN IT ANSWERS”

    And of course, both the lander and the rover will carry cameras to take detailed images of the lunar surface, just as Chang’e-4’s predecessor, Chang’e-3, did. Much of the Chang’e-4 design is modeled after Chang’e-3, which landed on the nearside of the Moon and told scientists a great deal about an area known as the Imbrium basin. Hopefully, Chang’e-4’s rover will move ****her than the rover on Chang’e-3, called Yutu, which stopped being able to travel after about a month.

    While it’s definitely unique, Chang’e-4 is just one step in the ladder of China’s decade-long Chang’e mission plan (Chang’e is a goddess of the Moon in Chinese mythology). Following this mission, China plans to launch another robotic mission to the Moon next year called Chang’e-5, which is designed to return samples from the nearside of the Moon. If successful, it’ll be the first time lunar material has been brought back to Earth since 1976. Beyond that, Neal thinks that a sample return from the far side of the Moon is on the horizon. “Chang’e-4 is a first step, and I’m sure it will raise more questions than it answers,” says Neal. “But showing the capability is there to land on the far side and rove, that tells us what’s the next step, and, as I say, robotic sample return would be the logical next step.”


    A rendering of the Chang’e-4 rover Image: Chinese Academy of Sciences

    In the more distant future, it’s possible that China hopes to put people on the Moon, though it hasn’t been open about those plans. Jones says that it looks like China is working toward crewed flight, by developing a new huge launch vehicle and concepts for a rocket that can carry people. “There’s no officially government-approved plan to put Chinese astronauts on the moon, however you can see that they are working on the various components that you need,” he says.

    Any human missions are still years away, and for now China is focused on Chang’e-4. But as is the case with many of China’s missions, the details surrounding this flight have been hard to come by. We know that the mission is set to launch on top of one of China’s Long March 3B rockets from the country’s Xichang Satellite Launch Center. And thanks to air closure notices, takeoff time is estimated to occur around 1:30PM ET on Friday, December 7th. China may only announce that the mission was a success after the spacecraft is on its way to the Moon, though Jones says we might hear earlier than that from other sources.

    “It might be that the first indication we have of launch is that some poor soul near Xichang launch center is woken up thinking there’s an earthquake and complaining about it on social media.” Jones says.

    If Chang’e-4 does make it to space, it will spend less than a month traveling to the Moon, likely touching down sometime in the first week of January. If that happens, China will have officially moved into its own elite group, as the only country to visit the side of the Moon we cannot see from Earth.
    I hope they have the wherewithal to play some Floyd during the mission.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  15. #15
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    2019 Celestial events

    Gotta luv something called the 'super blood wolf moon'

    A 'super blood wolf moon' and five eclipses are among 2019's major astronomy events
    By Andrea Diaz, CNN

    Updated 7:27 PM ET, Thu December 27, 2018

    (CNN)Stargazers around the world, rejoice! The universe is about to give you an exciting astronomical year.

    2019 is featuring five eclipses, a rare planet transit, one of the best meteor showers and a super blood wolf moon, but the fun doesn't stop there.
    The new year will also bring three supermoons, a blue moon, multiple meteor showers, close approach by the moon and Jupiter and several rocket launches.
    Although we would love to talk about all of the extraordinary occurrences, these are our top events to watch for in the sky in 2019:

    January 6: Partial Solar Eclipse



    The new year kicks off with an impressive bang, and no, we don't mean fireworks.

    In the first week of 2019, the moon will pass between the Earth and sun to stage a partial solar eclipse, NASA reports. Unfortunately, it will be visible only from northeast Asia and the North Pacific, as it will happen around 8:42 p.m. ET in the United States. Sky & Telescope predicts people will see 20% of the sun covered from Beijing, 30% from Tokyo and 37% from Vladivostok, Russia.

    January 21: Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse



    For the first time in three years, the United States will be able to experience a total lunar eclipse. According to NASA, it will be one of the sky's "most dazzling shows," as the moon will be at its closest point to Earth, making the moon appear slightly bigger and a lot brighter, an event that is often referred to as a "supermoon."
    But that's not the only thing that will make this eclipse stand out. Total lunar eclipses are often call "blood moons" because when the sun, Earth and moon align, the sunlight that passes through the Earth's atmosphere will appear to turn the moon red. And because lunar eclipses can occur only during a full moon -- and the first full moon in January is known as a "wolf moon" -- many are calling this spectacular event a "Super Blood Wolf Moon Eclipse."
    At around 12:12 a.m. ET, people in North and South America, as well as those in western parts of Europe and Africa, will have front-row seats to this show.

    May 6: Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower



    Although we will see multiple meteor showers through the year, the Eta Aquarids meteor shower will be one of the best ones we will be able to witness, Sky & Telescope reports.
    The Eta Aquarids was created by the dusty debris left behind by Halley's Comet, which flew by Earth in 1986, and although the famous comet won't be entering our solar system again until 2061, its remnants appear in our skies each year. This year is expected to put on quite a show.
    According to NASA, we can expect a new moon two days before the meteor shower. The new moon will mean darker skies, which will make it possible for the human eye to appreciate the Eta Aquarids' dazzling show.
    Although the Eta Aquarids will be active April 19 through May 26, its peak night will begin around 3 a.m. ET until dawn on May 6, and it's expected to produce as many as 20 to 40 meteors or more per hour.

    July 2: Total Solar Eclipse



    Were you able to witness the cool solar eclipse in North America in 2017? Well, now South Asia and South America will enjoy a day of no sun.
    In the late afternoon of July 2, a total solar eclipse will occur over southern parts of Chile and Argentina, and parts of the South Pacific. The entire event will take place from 12:55 to 5:50 p.m. ET, with the maximum eclipse occurring at 3:23 p.m., Sky & Telescope reports.

    July 16: Partial Lunar Eclipse



    We begin 2019 with a partial solar eclipse, so it's only fair we also get a lunar one. Unfortunately, the United States will not be witnessing this one, either.
    South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia will be able to see the full moon dive about two-thirds of the way into the Earth's umbral shadow beginning at 9:31 p.m. UT , Sky & Telescope reports.

    November 11: Rare Transit of Mercury



    For the second time in two years, Mercury will make rare pass in front of the sun, NASA reports.
    Mercury, the smallest planet in our solar system, passes between Earth and the sun about 13 times a century. The last trek took place in 2016, and for the first time in 10 years, the small planet was visible from Earth.
    This year, the transit will begin at 7:34 a.m. ET and last around 5 1/2 hours. It will appear as a black dot across the the face of the sun, and stargazers will be able to see it with the help of a telescope and solar filters.
    December 26: Annular Solar Eclipse

    2019 closes on a high note with a rare and glorious "ring of fire."



    The annular eclipse occurs when the circumference of the sun shines brightly from behind the moon. This year, the eclipse will begin right at dawn and pass over the Arabian Peninsula and arc over areas of South Asia.
    We hope you enjoy these amazing events to the fullest, but remember, NEVER look at the sun during any type of solar eclipse, as it could cause damage to your eyes.
    THREADS
    Hi; Moon we are back!!!
    Happy New Year!
    Gene Ching
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