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Thread: Michelle Yeoh

  1. #46
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    Still such a badass. I just luv Michelle.

    Jan. 6, 2019, 3:35 p.m.
    FASHION
    By TRACY BROWN
    Yes, Michelle Yeoh wore the ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ ring to the Golden Globes


    Michelle Yeoh on the Golden Globes' red carpet. (Jen Yamato / Los Angeles Times)

    Michelle Yeoh had fans seeing green on Sunday’s red carpet for the Golden Globes. The actress wore her now-famous “Crazy Rich Asians” engagement ring to the 76th annual ceremony.

    Part of Yeoh’s personal collection, the emerald-and-diamond ring played a pivotal role in the Golden Globe-nominated rom-com where it was introduced as Eleanor’s (Yeoh) engagement ring.

    Yeoh previously told The Times that she planned to wear the accessory because “the ring is so much a character in the film.”

    The ring symbolized Eleanor’s acceptance of her son’s American-born girlfriend (Rachel Chu, played by Constance Wu).

    Yeoh also previously revealed that she had purchased the ring as a gift for herself. “I don’t wait for people to send me flowers. If I want them, I’m going to send them to myself,” she said.

    “Crazy Rich Asians” has two Golden Globe nominations going into Sunday’s ceremony. The film is competing in the category of best musical or comedy picture, and Wu is a nominee for actress in a musical or comedy picture.

    THREADS
    Michelle Yeoh
    Crazy Rich Asians
    The Golden Globes
    Gene Ching
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  2. #47
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    Elle

    WE DON'T DESERVE MICHELLE YEOH
    If you think this is Michelle Yeoh's moment, think again. She's been kicking ass to the amazement of moviegoers for 30 years. But with the smash success of Crazy Rich Asians, Hollywood is finally recognizing her greatness.


    BY ESTELLE TANG
    FEB 21, 2019


    Dress, Miu Miu; Turtleneck, Jaime Major; Necklace and earrings, Bulgari; Bracelet, Van Cleef.
    EMILY SHUR

    Every Malaysian I know has a precise, detailed map in their head: a culinary topography, marked with the best curry noodles in the night market or where the freshest satay comes spitting off the grill. In Michelle Yeoh’s home town of Ipoh, locals might argue over who makes the silkiest tofu curds or expound on which vendors serve the best of the city’s signature poached chicken with bean sprouts. In that part of the world, food represents respect and love; it’s close to a religion.

    Yeoh and I, both Malaysian, understand this. We know what’s important—and that’s lunch. So I sit quietly as Yeoh, looking marble-perfect, surveys a different culinary landscape altogether: the BLVD Lounge in the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. All around us, the day’s lunch crowd is buzzing: a family the size of a small army attack their burgers; two businessmen, their suit jackets slung to the side, laugh over the remains of a long work lunch; an older man in a jaunty hat and a model contoured to Instagram perfection sip on wine.


    Dress, Miu Miu; Turtleneck, Jaime Major; Necklace and earrings, Bulgari; Bracelet, Van Cleef.
    EMILY SHUR

    And then there’s Yeoh in the middle of it all, eyes stalking the waitstaff from her perch at our table. “I’m always hungry,” she says, unmoving, except for a brief, twinkling glance in my direction. “It’s a Malaysian thing.” She doesn’t say anything more. She knows she doesn’t have to explain herself to me.

    If you’ve seen Crazy Rich Asians, you know what one look from Yeoh can do. It can make you long for her approval, and devastate you when it doesn't come. It can be warming or withering. It can feel like the end of the world. Now, it must feel laser-sharp, because our waiter suddenly turns around, meets Yeoh’s eye, and bustles over to our table. He takes our orders and sweeps back to the kitchen. Yeoh settles back into her chair, smiling. Now everything’s as it should be.

    Pop culture has yielded many iconic moms, but in playing Eleanor Young, Yeoh—56 years old, and a Leo, obviously—became the face of a new, terrifying kind of cinematic mother. The Young matriarch is a glamorous, exacting disciplinarian. She knows you could achieve greatness—but that you aren’t there yet. She’s a swift and unsentimental judge, quick to point out when you’re falling short. She expects as much from you as she’s given you herself, which is everything. That is, she’s a stereotypical Asian mom, a cultural archetype, yet one that has seen few iterations in Hollywood.

    On its face, Crazy Rich Asians is about a young woman falling for a bachelor, finding out he’s loaded, and struggling to fit into his world. Eleanor represents the guards at the gate, the barrier to entry. But to call her a villain would be an oversimplification. The movie’s extremely satisfying opening scene, in fact, belongs to Eleanor, introducing her as a fierce protector of her family’s honor. (She buys a hotel that refuses to accommodate them, no big deal.) For Eleanor, marrying into the revered Young family meant devoting herself to their needs, especially those of her son, Nick (Henry Golding). Having sacrificed her own happiness to ensure Nick ends up the favorite, Eleanor holds strict ideas about who can follow in her self-abnegating footsteps. And Nick’s spirited Chinese-American girlfriend Rachel (Constance Wu) ain’t it.

    Eleanor’s demanding standards create and control the movie’s emotional weather. And she owns the film’s most startling moment. After a seemingly delightful afternoon of making dumplings, during which Rachel gets to know Nick’s close-knit relatives, Eleanor and Rachel run into one another on the grand staircase of the Young family home. After a brief tête-à-tête, Eleanor gently touches Rachel’s face and says: “You will never be enough.”

    You couldn’t pay someone to ruin you more completely.

    Yeoh's performance turned that gesture into a gut-punch. “I just went and touched her face,” she says, “and when they called cut, everybody went...” She puts her hand to her chest and lets out a sharp gasp.

    “I’ve never had this conversation with Constance, but something definitely intimidated her every time,” says director Jon M. Chu. “Constance couldn’t get through the scene because she would just break down and cry. It was just so brutal. They’re just words! It’s crazy.” Twitter self-flagellants were also in awe of the fierce put-down. "Imagine having Michelle Yeoh telling you you'll never be enough,” wrote one. “I would instantly die.”

    “I used to have my own voice in my head telling me I'll never be enough,” wrote another, “but at least now it's Michelle Yeoh's.”


    Top, Balmain; Jeans, Levis; Tiara, Beladora
    EMILY SHUR

    I read some of these gasping, semi-erotic plaudits out to her over our salads. Yeoh is bemused but game—and then I get to one about her Star Trek: Discovery character. For the uninitiated, that’s Emperor Philippa Georgiou, a sword-wielding ruler partial to dominatrix-adjacent leather suits. She's so popular she’s getting her own CBS All Access spin-off. I read this particular tweet with a frisson of worry. Will this immaculate swan of a woman understand the internet’s ***** vernacular and take it for the affection it is? “‘I want Emperor Georgiou,’” I say, “‘to step on me.’”\


    CBS

    Yeoh snaps her head back and releases a full-throated cackle of astonishing volume. She throws a starched napkin over her face, but it does nothing to muffle the sound. It lasts for several seconds and seemingly fills the room. Eleanor Young would never.

    The tweet has the same cackle-inducing power over Sonequa Martin-Green, Yeoh’s Discovery co-star. “These are the same sorts of jokes that we have around set,” she explains over the phone. “I'm not going to disagree with Michelle, because she'll kick me in the face. Obviously she never would, and that's why we're able to joke that way. She couldn’t be more loving and jovial.”
    continued next post
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  3. #48
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    Continued from previous post

    "WHEN I FIRST CAME OUT HERE, HONESTLY, THERE WAS NO REGARD FOR ASIAN ACTORS. THEY WERE LIKE, 'OH, YOU SPEAK ENGLISH!'"

    Martin-Green and Yeoh were the first two women of color to take the helm in a Star Trek franchise. That shared achievement has grown into an almost familial bond: On set, Martin-Green calls Yeoh “mother,” and Yeoh calls her “daughter.” They’ve held each other during long hours shooting in Jordan, where early Discovery scenes were filmed. They’ve peed behind shrubs in the Bedouin Desert after the production’s Port-a-Potties didn’t arrive, and they still laugh about it today.

    Growing up, Martin-Green learned about “powerful women who were fighters” from her own mom, who introduced her to Yeoh’s early action movies. So when Martin-Green first met Yeoh, who had cut such an intimidating figure in her mind, she was struck by how warm she was in person.


    EVERETT

    What didn’t surprise her was that, simply put, Michelle Yeoh kicks ass. Several supercuts of Yeoh’s fearsome fighting scenes recently made the rounds on social media. Two swords in hand, she backflips her way through Reign of Assassins. She switches between weapons without losing a breath in Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. She’s doing the air-splits in Supercop. “Oh, the scorpion kick,” says Yeoh of her signature move in Yes, Madam, like it’s the Macarena or something.

    A pageant queen and former ballet dancer whose career was derailed by a back injury, Yeoh was always “very physical.” The actress still does her own stunts: That’s all her in Star Trek. But when she appeared in Yes, Madam, her first action role, she had never studied martial arts. To get her up to speed, the production company set her up with an martial arts expert. But he lacked, she puts it generously, a teacherly bent. “He'd be like, ‘Just do it,’” Yeoh says now, still incredulous. “‘What do you mean, Just do it?’”

    So she self-guided her own training, spending hours a day in the gym and getting to know the stuntmen. “They were curious,” she says, and they saw the former Miss Malaysia as an oddity, trying to psych her out with intense workouts and advanced moves. Thanks to Yeoh’s ballet background, though, she was flexible and strong. She kept going. They stopped playing games.

    Soon, crowds would gather to gawk at Yeoh on set, which only made her more determined to wow them. “I think when you're young, you're like, ‘What have I got to lose?’" That “why not?” attitude led to one of her most skeleton-rattling stunts: In Supercop, Yeoh played Interpol inspector Jessica Yang, a supervisor on police officer Ka Kui’s (Jackie Chan) mission to infiltrate a drug organization. During the film’s climax, she jumps a moving motorbike off a bridge and onto a train speeding underneath. A normal person shouldn’t do that kind of thing. Even an action star shouldn’t do that kind of thing.

    “Those were insane times,” she says. “I was empowered by the fact I was so fit. I was doing all these crazy, fun things, and people were astonished.” When she revisited the movie to dub the English dialogue, though, she was aghast. “I went, What the hell was I thinking? There were a number of times that it all could have gone tremendously wrong.” In a twist of fate, she’s now an ambassador for road safety in Malaysia. When I bring it up, she laughs. “Well, don't do what I do on screen, okay?”


    EMILY SHUR

    Yeoh’s career has been unusual, to say the least. Nothing like it existed before her. Her ex-ballerina’s grace, sheer physical power, and subtle stoicism made her a superstar in Asian cinema, particularly in the action genre. But her crossover into Hollywood was more fraught. “When I first came out here, honestly, there was no regard for Asian actors,” Yeoh says. “They were like, ‘Oh, you speak English!’” For years, Yeoh was billed as Michelle Khan, a stage name selected to sound racially ambiguous. On movie posters, she would sometimes appear as a woman of indecipherable ethnicity, her likeness so reworked that it was essentially a cartoon. Once, Yeoh saw one and asked, “‘Whoa, what movie is this?’ And they said, ‘That’s your movie.’”
    continued next post
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    Continued from previous post

    "WE COULD ASK ANYONE ON OUR CAST—THEY WERE ALL INSPIRED BY HER TO COME INTO THIS BUSINESS."—JON M. CHU

    Still, she scored major roles in what would become blockbuster hits in America: Colonel Wai Lin in Tomorrow Never Dies, a Bond girl whose combat prowess gave Pierce Brosnan’s 007 a run for his money; geisha doyenne Mameha in Memoirs of a Geisha; and the loyal, poised fighter Yu Shu Lien in Ang Lee’s wuxia epic Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon. But while Crouching Tiger remains the highest-grossing foreign-language movie in American history, it didn’t result in instant stardom for Yeoh or its other Asian stars.

    Landing Tomorrow Never Dies did, however, allow Michelle “Khan” to exit stage left. Yeoh has used her birth name ever since. “After that, it was like, You know what? My name is not so hard.”


    GETTY IMAGES

    From early on in the development of Crazy Rich Asians, everyone from Chu to the book’s author Kevin Kwan and executive producers Nina Jacobson and Brad Simpson wanted Yeoh to play Eleanor. “It was sort of like, No duh,” Chu says.

    Yeoh could project the power, elegance, and intelligence Eleanor required. But more than that, as one of very few Asian actresses to enjoy a long career in Asian and American markets, she held an almost talismanic importance for the first Hollywood movie with an all-Asian cast in 25 years. (The last was 1993’s The Joy Luck Club.) “We could ask anyone on our cast,” Chu says. “They were all inspired by her to come into this business.”

    Yet in the wake of Crazy Rich Asians and its wild success, some wondered where Yeoh had been for the last 20 years. And when you tremble at her steely, flawless performance as Eleanor, it’s tempting to ask: Why isn’t Michelle Yeoh a bigger star? As Chu has said: “She should have much more recognition. She should be on the same level with a Meryl Streep.”

    “I don’t think about that,” Yeoh demurs when I ask about it. She’s grateful for what she’s been able to achieve. “Maybe it’s because I'm Chinese—I like to please the people around me. But you don't sit there and think about it.” What Yeoh knows better than most is that until the runaway box-office success of Crazy Rich Asians, Hollywood stardom has been virtually impenetrable to Asian women. But for a new generation of Asian actresses working in Hollywood—think Lucy Liu, Constance Wu, Awkwafina, and Greta Lee—perhaps it’s that much easier to break boundaries when Yeoh has taken a whack at them first.

    Crazy Rich Asians benefited from Yeoh’s rich experience. She had plenty of opinions about Eleanor, from her motivations and actions (the character is much more nuanced than the frantic, icy antagonist of the book) to what color the lanterns in her garden should be (red, not white, which in Chinese culture symbolizes death).

    But one behind-the-scenes tweak, care of Yeoh, has attained legendary status. Eleanor’s engagement ring, featuring a gargantuan emerald nugget flanked by two diamonds, plays a crucial role in the film. Chu originally wanted an emerald ring modeled after one that John F. Kennedy had designed for Jackie, an ornate, jewel-encrusted honker. But the version ginned up by production didn’t meet Yeoh’s standards.


    Jacket, skirt, tie, skirt, all Dior; Heels, Christian Louboutin
    EMILY SHUR

    “She just took two seconds,” Chu recalls. “And she said, ‘No, that's not the ring.’ We were like, ‘Oh, uh, yeah, well...what else do you have?’” Like a genie, Yeoh supplied one of her own baubles: the very rock you see on screen. It’s massive, which will come as no surprise to anyone who’s seen Yeoh dripping in diamonds and emeralds on the red carpet. It looks like you’d have to sell a small country to buy it.

    “I believe in treating yourself,” Yeoh explains when I ask about the bling, which came from an Aladdin’s cave of treasures belonging to a jeweler friend. “I believe that things should speak to you, and when I saw that stone, it was like love at first sight.” A grin spreads across her face. “Then I thought, ****, maybe I should ask how much it is.”

    Her folly was the movie’s windfall. “I felt like this was the Eleanor piece,” says Yeoh. “It's recognizable, but it's so simple. It's not a big name, it doesn't come from a particular brand.” But its extravagance stressed out everyone on set. “The producers were more worried than I was,” she says, laughing. “I said, ‘It's already insured, don't worry.’”


    WARNER BROS.

    Yeoh’s jewelry is kind of a signature. “I love my jewels,” she says. “When I used to live in Hong Kong, my friends and I would play Mahjong”—the Chinese game that plays a pivotal role in the movie—“and we would wear all our rings, all our bracelets, and go like this.” She swirls her hands around as if she’s shuffling tiles on the bright green felt of a playing table, imagining the tornado-meets-windchime clacking of precious stones and glittering metal. Then her head goes back, and there’s that boisterous laugh again.

    As if by conjuring, Yeoh spots Crazy Rich Asians author Kevin Kwan ensconced in another corner of the restaurant. When our time comes to an end, she gets up to greet him. But she’s concerned; my plate isn’t empty. “You didn't get to eat!” she says. I assure her I’ll finish every last bite before I go. “Okay, good,” she says, squeezing my shoulder gently.

    It’s what Eleanor Young does when she sees Nick for the first time—makes sure he’s fed. It’s what she does when she hand-rolls dumplings with her family—pays respect to tradition and propriety. And I think it means the same thing coming from Michelle Yeoh. She knows how important it is.


    EMILY SHUR

    Photography by Emily Shur | Cinematography by Danny Dwyer | Style Editor Yashua Simmons | Style Assistant Mark-Paul Barro | Hair by Makiko Nara using Oribe at Walter Schupfer Management Makeup by Sabrina Bedrani for Christian Dior Beauty | Special Thanks to Airbnb | Special Thanks to Cavallier Investigations | Special Thanks to Ladurée | Video Production by Rachel Liberman | Production by Oona Wally, Suze Lee, & Sameet Sharma
    ESTELLE TANG Senior Editor
    Estelle Tang is the Senior Editor covering culture and entertainment at ELLE.com, including TV, movies, books, and music.
    Luv Michelle. Just luv her.

    I think we've discussed all the films and shows mentioned above and I don't feel like linking them right now.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #50
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    Well alright. Now I'm invested in this.

    FILM
    CANNES
    Michelle Yeoh Joins ‘Gunpowder Milkshake’ – Cannes
    By Mike Fleming Jr
    Co-Editor-in-Chief, Film
    @DeadlineMike


    Matt Baron/Shutterstock

    Michelle Yeoh has committed to star in Gunpowder Milkshake, joining Avengers: Endgame and Guardians of the Galaxy‘s Karen Gillan, Game of Thrones‘ Lena Headey, Black Panther‘s Angela Bassett and Billions‘ Paul Giamatti. Pic is a female-driven high-concept assassin story that has a rich mythology and spans multiple generations.

    Written and directed by Big Bad Wolves‘ Navot Papushado, the film begins shooting at the Babelsberg FilmStudio in Germany, with principal photography commencing June 3. Ehud Lavski has co-written.

    Studiocanal and The Picture Company partners Andrew Rona & Alex Heineman produce. Papushado’s Big Bad Wolves’ partner Aharon Keshales is exec producer.

    Yeoh is coming off shooting the Avatar sequels, Crazy Rich Asians and Star Trek: Discovery. She returns to the action game after Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the 007 film Tomorrow Never Dies. She is represented by her manager David Unger of Artist International.

    Studiocanal will release in the UK, Australia, New Zealand, Germany and France, and will be selling the rest of world at Cannes. It is co-repping U.S. rights with UTA.

    The Picture Company has an overall deal with Studiocanal.
    THREADS
    Gunpowder Milkshake
    Cannes
    Michelle Yeoh
    Gene Ching
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  6. #51
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    I would be so honored to be told to f*** off by Michelle

    Carl Samson·July 8, 2019·6 min read
    Michelle Yeoh Tells Lena Headey to ‘F*** Off’ in Hilarious Video



    Michelle Yeoh and Lena Headey have certainly gotten closer on the set of “Gunpowder Milkshake.”

    On Thursday, Headey shared a short video showing exactly what it’s like to work with the “Crazy Rich Asians” star — especially when she “hates” you.


    Image via Instagram / @iamlenaheadey

    “Good morning, Michelle!” Headey greets Yeoh, who comes out from a trailer truck. “How are you doing?”

    In response, Yeoh says, “Oh, f*** off.”


    Image via Instagram / @iamlenaheadey

    The exchange, which ends with Yeoh even giving Headey what appears to be the finger, has raked in nearly a million plays.

    “I LOVE HER SO MUCH ITS ANNOYING. Obvs,” the “Game of Thrones” star captioned the video.

    iamlenaheadey
    Verified


    Click video for sound

    984,975 views
    iamlenaheadey's profile picture
    iamlenaheadey
    Verified
    I LOVE HER SO MUCH ITS ANNOYING . Obvs @michelleyeoh_official 🥰🥰🥰🥰🥰
    Follow the link to Lena's gram above to hear it.

    THREADS
    Michelle Yeoh
    Gunpowder Milkshake
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  7. #52
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    Dangerous

    I just stumbled across this when searching for something else entirely. Good to know, right?

    Michelle Yeoh tops list of most ‘dangerous’ celebrities to search for online in S’pore, says study
    By*JUSTIN ONG


    REUTERS
    Malaysian actress Michelle Yeoh (pictured) at the premiere of the 2018 hit Crazy Rich Asians in Los Angeles.

    Published 22 OCTOBER, 2019 UPDATED 22 OCTOBER, 2019

    SINGAPORE — A simple web search for free content featuring Malaysian actress Michelle Yeoh could expose searchers to a high level of risk of malicious websites and viruses, according to a study released on Tuesday (Oct 22).

    Yeoh, who most recently starred*in 2018 box office hit Crazy Rich Asians, tops the list of the most dangerous celebrities to search for online in Singapore, the study by computer security company McAfee found.

    Yeoh, 57, has a string of hit movies dating back decades including the 1997 James Bond movie Tomorrow Never Dies and the 2000 martial arts hit Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

    Other famous names that made the top 10 list include rapper and musician Nicki Minaj in second place, American actress Scarlett Johansson in sixth, and Taiwanese singer A-mei in 10th spot.

    WHY DOES IT HAPPEN?

    Consumers have multiple platforms to choose from to access content about their favourite celebrities. This gives them the opportunity to conduct potentially dangerous searches across the Internet to find the latest celebrity news and gossip, McAfee said.

    Read also: Avril Lavigne, Bruno Mars named ‘most dangerous’ in online searches

    Cybercriminals use these opportunities to lure unsuspecting consumers to malicious websites that may install malware or steal personal information and passwords.

    HOW ARE THE 'MOST DANGEROUS' CELEBRITIES IDENTIFIED?

    The top celebrities in the study had search terms coupled with search terms such as “torrent” or “pirated download” (for example, “Michelle Yeoh” and “pirated download”). Torrent files are often used to download illegal movies, songs or games.

    Read also: Sharp spike in web threats against S’pore Internet users in 2018: Cyber security firm

    McAfee measured the risk levels of domains and URLs generated by these searches and assigned a risk-level score to the sites, before compiling the top 10 list.

    The firm said that when searching for these celebrities, consumers are often unaware of the risks involved in downloading content featuring the celebrities.

    Personal information is often compromised in exchange for access to consumers’*favourite celebrities, movies, television shows or music, said Mr Shashwat Khandelwal, head of South-east Asia consumer business*at McAfee.

    McAfee said that despite many streaming services available to consumers, many still “choose to put their digital lives at risk in exchange for pirated content” in the pursuit of “free” options.

    “It’s important for these viewers to understand the risks associated with torrent or pirated downloads, as they may open up themselves to savvy cybercriminals and end up having a much higher cost to pay,” McAfee added.

    WHAT CAN CONSUMERS DO?

    Stream and download movies, music and TV shows directly only from a reliable source. The safest thing to do is to wait for the official release instead of visiting third-party websites that may contain malicious software (malware) disguised as pirated video files.

    Use a*comprehensive cybersecurity solution to protect yourself*from malware, phishing attacks, and other threats.

    Use a “web reputation” tool. These tools — many of which are available for free — help alert users when they are about to go to a malicious website.

    Use parental control software. Ensure that limits are set for your child on the devices they use and use parental control software to help minimise exposure to potentially malicious or inappropriate websites.

    *
    Gene Ching
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  8. #53
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    Best Michelle Yeoh Movies You Need to Watch Right Now

    Gene Ching
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    Everything Everywhere: Inside the Craziest Fight Scene You’ll Ever See

    Gene Ching
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  10. #55
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    Dr. Yeoh

    Michelle Yeoh becomes Dr. Yeoh as first Asian artist to receive AFI’s honorary doctorate in fine arts
    Grace Kim
    4 days ago



    Michelle Yeoh will receive an honorary doctorate of fine arts degree from the American Film Institute “for contributions of distinction to the art of the moving image.”

    She will be the first Asian artist to receive the honor.

    The award will be presented on Saturday, Aug. 13, at Hollywood’s iconic TCL Chinese Theatre during the commencement ceremony for AFI Conservatory’s Class of 2022.

    Malaysian actor Michelle Yeoh will become the first Asian artist to receive an honorary doctorate of fine arts degree from the American Film Institute (AFI).

    The AFI announced on Monday that Yeoh will be recognized “for contributions of distinction to the art of the moving image” spanning her over-40-year career.

    Yeoh will be presented the honor on Saturday, Aug. 13, at Hollywood’s iconic TCL Chinese Theatre during the commencement ceremony for AFI Conservatory’s Class of 2022. AFI Trustee Emeritus Lawrence Herbert will also be conferred with an honorary doctorate of communication arts degree for his commitment to AFI’s mission on the same day.

    “Michelle Yeoh and Lawrence Herbert have inspired the world with their remarkable talents,” AFI President and CEO Bob Gazzale said in a statement on Monday. “Though both of these trailblazers have proven impact in vastly different ways, it is their shared dedication to the art of the moving image that provides this proud moment for AFI to shine a proper light upon their gifts given us.”

    Yeoh has accumulated over 70 acting credits across film and TV in a number of diverse roles. The actor made a name for herself early on in her career within Hong Kong’s film industry, then rose to international stardom in the ‘90s with films such as “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” and the James Bond film “Tomorrow Never Dies.” Some of her other notable works over the past few decades include “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Crazy Rich Asians,” “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2” and “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings.”

    Her recent performance as the star of A24’s critically acclaimed “Everything Everywhere All at Once” is generating Oscar buzz. The mind-boggling film became the studio’s first film to reach the $100 million milestone at the box office last week.

    Yeoh will also be leading an all-Asian cast in the upcoming Netflix drama series “The Brothers Sun.”


    Featured Image via Getty
    First Asian doctorate here? Aren't we all Doctors? Asians be lagging.
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  11. #56
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    Michelle at TIFF

    Aug 29, 2022 8:00am PT
    Michelle Yeoh to Receive Toronto Film Festival’s Groundbreaker Award


    By Patrick Frater


    Michelle Yeoh
    Thomas Laisne, Getty Images for Richard Mille

    Michelle Yeoh will receive the Toronto International Film Festival’s inaugural Share Her Journey Groundbreaker Award.

    The TIFF Share Her Journey Groundbreaker Award recognizes a woman who is a leader in the film industry and has made a positive impact for women throughout their career.

    The award, sponsored by Bulgari, will be presented at an in-person gala fundraiser on Sunday, Sept. 11 at the Fairmont Royal York Hotel.

    “Michelle Yeoh is the definition of groundbreaking,” said Cameron Bailey, TIFF CEO. “Her screen work has spanned continents, genres and decades. This year she delivered a performance in ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once’ that shows her limitless abilities.”

    With a nearly 40-year career, Yeoh has broken barriers and inspired generations of audiences with her performances. These include “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon,” “Tomorrow Never Dies” and “Crazy Rich Asians.”

    Born in Malaysia and educated in the U.K., Yeoh enjoyed her initial acting success in 1990s Hong Kong action films and briefly became a producer following stardom in Roger Spottiswoode’s James Bond title “Tomorrow Never Dies” and Ang Lee’s 2000 breakout hit “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.”

    Returning to acting, she went on to defy convention and build a global career with key roles in Rob Marshall’s “Memoirs of a Geisha,” Danny Boyle’s “Sunshine,” and Jon Chu’s “Crazy Rich Asians.” After appearing in James Gunn’s second installment of the “Guardians of the Galaxy” franchise, Yeoh returned to the Marvel universe in Destin Daniel Cretton’s “Shang-Chi.” In March 2022, she starred in the Daniels’ genre-melting “Everything Everywhere All at Once,” which has since become A24’s highest grossing film.

    Yeoh was recently announced as the first Asian artist to receive the American Film Institute Honor, and was this year featured in the Time 100 “Most Influential People” list.

    Past TIFF Tribute Awards have gone to Jessica Chastain, Roger Deakins, Anthony Hopkins, Joaquin Phoenix, Taika Waititi, and Chloe Zhao.

    “Bulgari has a long history of championing women, in front of and behind the camera, in the cinematic arts. Supporting this TIFF Tribute Award is a continuation of this legacy of cultivating future talent and their groundbreaking work that enriches the world we live in,” said Jean-Christophe Babin, CEO of Bulgari Group.
    Asian-Film-Festivals-and-Awards
    Michelle-Yeoh
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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