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Thread: Golden Horse Film Festival

  1. #16
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    PRC boycotts

    Ang Lee Says China Boycott of Taiwan's Golden Horse Awards a Loss
    8:13 PM PST 11/25/2019 by the Associated Press


    Frazer Harrison/Getty Images
    Ang Lee

    Beijing’s order to give Saturday night’s awards show the cold shoulder was part of its campaign to rachet up economic and political pressure on the island it claims as its own territory.

    Taiwanese filmmaker Ang Lee says China’s boycott of Taiwan’s Golden Horse film awards demonstrates how politics can take its toll on the arts.

    Beijing’s order to give Saturday night’s awards show the cold shoulder was part of its campaign to rachet up economic and political pressure on the island it claims as its own territory.

    Speaking to reporters Saturday night, Lee said politics was “an aspect we do not want to see. But we have to face it, because we live in this world.”

    “Everybody knows it, it is indeed a loss, no matter the red carpet or the films,” continued Lee, the festival’s chair. “But, of course, our best films, I personally think that they are not less good than the previous years. We still have very good films this year.”

    China held its own Golden Rooster film awards on Saturday, featuring films approved by Communist Party censors.

    Even without the ban, Chinese artists might have found it difficult to attend after Beijing issued a ban on solo travel to Taiwan beginning Sept. 1.

    Chinese participation came into doubt following last year’s ceremony, when documentary director Fu Yue said during her award acceptance speech that she hoped the world would one day recognize Taiwan as an independent country, something only a handful of nations currently do.

    Taiwan split from mainland China amid civil war in 1949, but Beijing considers the self-ruled island part of its territory.

    Speakers at Saturday’s Golden Horse Awards also expressed support for anti-government protestors in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory of Hong Kong.

    Entertainment figures in Taiwan and Hong Kong have routinely been blacklisted in China after expressing pro-independence or pro-democracy views.

    When politics takes its toll on the arts, the arts can take its toll on politics.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
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    I hope the mainland *never* absorbs Taiwan. Unfortunately, mainland China has been ratcheting up its hard line and shows no signs of slowing down. The whole idea of not leaving Taiwan alone to be an independent country is stupid anyway, and is all based on “face,” the same way that, IMO, China will never relent against the HK protesters. It’s all about face. If China gives concessions they will “lose face”. They would rather openly crush millions of people than to give an inch. And no outside countries would or could do anything about it because of the $$$ and business interests. This is what happens when governments, which technically should be there to serve the people, instead only serve themselves (which is true of ALL governments, BTW). Some are simply more openly hardline than others.

    What should it matter to the average person in mainland China who isn’t brainwashed if Taiwan becomes a part of it or not? Would it improve anybody’s lives?

    Back in the day (1960s through the ‘80s), Hong Kong and Taiwan had vibrant, thriving cinema. Now with those industries generally moribund, everything comes from China, and tends to look the same. The weather is always dark or gray. Even the young actors and actresses from China nowadays all tend to look and act more or less the same, whereas in the ‘70s and ‘80s, actors from HK and Taiwan all had different, unique appearances and personalities. Even though the budgets back then were smaller, there was a freshness that’s absent now, IMO. I don’t find much of any of the offerings out of China filling me with anticipation.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 11-26-2019 at 10:48 AM.

  3. #18
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    ttt 4 2021

    Oct 6, 2021 1:19am PT
    ‘Drifting’ Leads Golden Horse Awards Race as Hong Kong Films Make Cautious Return


    By Vivienne Chow


    Courtesy of Golden Horse FA
    Hong Kong drama “Drifting” leads Taiwan’s Golden Horse Film Awards race with 12 nominations including best narrative feature and best adapted screenplay, organizers announced on Tuesday.

    The film that revolves around the tragedy of homeless people in Hong Kong also earned a nomination for Jun Li in the best director category. Veteran actor Francis Ng, who plays a homeless drug addict battling for justice, was also nominated for best leading actor.

    Since 2019, Beijing has operated a mainland Chinese boycott of the awards that for many years were seen as the highest accoladed for Chinese-language filmmaking. And in 2019 and 2020 most Hong Kong films and filmmakers also stayed away. This year’s list sees an uptick in the Hong Kong participation, but only in the cases of films that are unlikely ever to receive a release in mainland China.

    The domination of “Drifting” in the race, however, is closely challenged by “The Falls,” Taiwan’s entry to the Venice Film Festival, drama “Till We Meet Again” and crime thriller “The Soul.” Each received 11 nominations including best narrative feature. Also competing in this category is the drama “American Girl.”

    “The Falls” filmmaker Chung Mong-hong was also nominated for best director for his dramatic piece revolving around a mother-daughter relationship that is set against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic. Also competing for best director are Cheng Wei-hao for “The Soul,” Clara Law for “Drifting Petals” and Ho Wi-ding for “Terrorizers.”

    The two female leads of “The Falls,” Alyssa Chia and Gingle Wang are compete for the best leading actress award. They face competition from Hong Kong’s Karena Lam and Caitlin Fang, who play a mother-daughter combo in “American Girl,” and Chen Shiang-chyi for “Increasing Echo.”

    Chang Chen, who lost 12 kg and shaved his head to play the role of a cancer patient in “The Soul,” was nominated for best actor. Also nominated are Kai Ko, who plays a hustler in Taiwanese-Austrian production “Moneyboys,” Roy Chiu for “Man in Love” and Cheng Jen-shuo in “Gatao — The Last Stray.”

    Hong Kong protest documentary “Revolution of Our Times” by Kiwi Chow and Hongkongers, which had a surprise screening at Cannes Film Festival, was nominated for best documentary feature.

    The Fruit Chan-directed horror comedy “Coffin Homes,” which mocks Hong Kong people’s desperation for a home due to high rent, earned a nomination for best original screenplay for the script written by Chan and Jason Lam, as well as for best action choreography. Auteur Tsai Ming-liang’s short film “The Night,” filmed in Hong Kong 2019 capturing the cityscape during the protests, was nominated for best documentary short film.

    All nominated films will be screened at the Golden Horse Film Festival, which kicks off on Nov. 11. The awards will be presented on Nov. 27 at a ceremony in Taipei.
    I'm out of the loop and know none of these films.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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