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Thread: Happy mid autumn festival

  1. #61
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    Moon Festival

    Our Publisher Emeritus Gigi Oh and Tiger Claw President Jonny Oh were at the Moon Festival celebration at the Chinese Embassy in DC. At Gigi's request, I just posted some photos of them on our Moon Festival facebook album.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  2. #62
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    ttt for 2018!

    I love the term 'mooncake madness'

    Mooncake madness descends as cross-border trade in delicacies swells
    Agents buy up mooncake coupons and resell them for profit, as hungry customers struggle to get their hands on the seasonal delicacy

    PUBLISHED : Saturday, 04 August, 2018, 2:31pm
    UPDATED : Saturday, 04 August, 2018, 2:31pm
    Mandy Zheng
    https://twitter.com/MandyZheng5477



    Hong Kong’s annual mooncake craze is already in full swing, as customers queue up for coupons for the delicacy at Maxim’s Cake stores across the city.

    While coupons offered at the stores sold out in two days, resellers have inflated prices dramatically, from the initial offering price of HK$228 to about HK$330 per coupon, according to shopping agents from mainland China.

    Mooncake coupons give a discount on the price of a box of mooncakes, and ensure buyers can pick up their desserts the day they first become available.

    Sharon Tang, an insurance broker who has lived in the city for five years, says she has seen the coupon resale market boom in recent years.

    “When you see WeChat posts about Hong Kong mooncakes five or six times a day, you start wondering: ‘why they are so [popular]?’” adds Tang, who also works as part-time buyer. “It’s all about marketing strategy.”


    Hong Kong mooncakes are popular on mainland China. Photo: Felix Wong

    Tang, who is in her 20s, says she did not line up at stores or place orders online this year. Instead, she bought about 15 coupons at HK$330 each from “a friend working at a professional buying agent team”, who managed to get them even before they began selling at Maxim’s stores.

    “It’s not possible to snap one up online or at the store, because there are just too many people. You need to find other ways,” Tang says, adding that she resold the coupons to friends and relatives.

    And prices among the resellers continue to rocket, Tang says. “Three days ago I bought some, and yesterday when I checked, the price had risen another HK$10.”

    Maxim’s, the local restaurant chain famous for its cakes and dim sum, produces mooncakes that are especially popular among mainland Chinese customers. A particular favourite is the lava custard mooncake: a box of six normally sells at HK$368, but with a coupon customers are entitled to a 60 per cent discount.

    HKU graduate Mike Li, 23, describes the zeal of mooncake hunters as “too crazy”. Having lived in Shenzhen since graduation, Li comes to the city once a week to shop for a small group of clients he established during his college years. Like Tang, he purchases mooncake coupons from professional agents, who told him “not to bother lining up because it’s absolutely impossible to get one”.

    The same agents also warned him that conflicts had broken out between locals and mainland Chinese customers. “They sent a video to our group chat recently, apparently showing a Hong Kong grandpa calling the police to complain about mainlanders snatching all the mooncakes,” Li recalls.

    Li, who is ahead of the mooncake curve, bought more than 40 mooncake coupons at the lower price of HK$285, and plans to use them all to buy mooncakes for his customers, charging HK$340 per box, netting a profit of HK$55 per deal.

    “A lot of people come to me after seeing online ads for Maxim’s cakes and dim sum. Most of them don’t know the original price, so they don’t have a sense of whether it’s expensive or not,” Li says.

    Zephyr Liang, a university student based in Beijing, says: “I feel that more people around me are buying mooncakes from Hong Kong this year because they have developed a high reputation on social media, becoming so-called ‘web celebrity food’.”

    Every year, the 22-year-old foodie orders three boxes of Maxim’s mooncakes on Taobao, Alibaba’s online shopping centre, from agents in the city. “I know some mooncakes with Hong Kong branding are actually made in mainland China, but I prefer the ones produced in Hong Kong. Somehow they just taste different,” Liang says.


    People buying mooncakes at Tai Tung Bakery in preparation for the Mid Autumn Festival last year. Photo: Felix Wong

    “Last year there were so many fake ones, so this year some buyers even live-streamed themselves queuing up outside stores,” Liang says.

    “It’s terrifying, how some retailers lie and sell fake products,” she says. “I just wish I was from Hong Kong.”

    For its part, Maxim’s is predictably delighted that its products are so popular. Speaking to the Post about the situation, a spokesperson explained the apparent shortage of cakes: “the supply of our Lava Custard Mooncake is limited and it is available for sale and redemption by phases.”

    Maxim’s did not respond to an inquiry from the Post about how many coupons they have sold this year so far, or how many people queued up in their stores across the city.

    The craving for mooncakes, however, could be problematic when it comes to maintaining a balanced diet, says nutritionist Kathy Ng Yiu-fan.

    For example, a white lotus seed paste mooncake with two yolks – which commonly appears in Hong Kong households during the Mid-Autumn Festival – contains six teaspoons of oil and nearly 800 calories, Ng explains, adding that it is “almost equivalent to the entire recommended daily fat intake for a single adult”.

    Ng suggests customers go for “healthier mooncakes with a lower level of fat and sugar”, such as snowy mooncakes, which only contain half the amount of fat of traditional types.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #63
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    Happy Mid-Autumn Festival!

    The Mid-Autumn Festival Starts Today. Here's What to Know About the Harvest Holiday
    Time
    Eli Meixler
    September 23, 2018

    An age-old harvest tradition begins today with East Asian communities around the world celebrating the first full moon of fall.

    Based on the lunar calendar, the Mid-Autumn Festival corresponds with the bright orange glow of the Harvest Moon. Many people take off work to gather with their families, light lanterns, enjoy mooncakes and gaze at the luminescent night sky. To mark the seasonal holiday, Google created an autumnal Doodle featuring tea, mooncakes and the reflection of a full, bountiful moon.

    As celebrations kickoff, here’s what to know:

    What is the Mid-Autumn Festival?

    Known by various names throughout Asia, including Moon Festival and Harvest Moon Festival, the mid-autumn ritual was popularized more than a thousand years ago during China’s Tang dynasty (618–907 CE).

    While it has no fixed date on the Gregorian calendar, the holiday is traditionally celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th month in the East Asian lunar calendar. It corresponds with the first full moon after the Autumnal Equinox. This year, celebrations start on Sept. 24.

    The holiday is also associated with the Chinese moon goddess Chang’e. As legend has it, Chang’e overindulged on the “elixir of life” and ascended to the moon. She is fated to remain there, accompanied by her jade rabbit and a lumberjack.

    This week, festival-goers will offer fruit, wine and mooncakes to the wayward goddess in hopes of ensuring an abundant harvest.

    Where is it celebrated?

    Major celebrations take place in China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Japan, Singapore, Korea, Malaysia, Vietnam and the Philippines. Many in the East Asian diaspora also observe the holiday, with families in the U.S., Europe and elsewhere gathering to mark the autumn thanksgiving festival.

    In Vietnam, where the holiday is known as Trung Thu, children play games, don masks and march in nighttime lantern parades.

    In Korea, the holiday is known as Chuseok, and has a strong association with heritage. Many people return to their hometowns to visit the graves of their ancestors, which they clean before making offerings.


    dance team performs the Fire Dragon Dance to celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival in Hong Kong on Sept. 23, 2018.

    How is it celebrated?

    One of the most common ways people celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival is by enjoying mooncakes — a dense sweet pastry that is baked or steamed and then cut into wedges and accompanied by tea. Traditionally, mooncakes are filled with with lotus paste and salted egg yolk. Other varieties contain red bean or date paste, as well as nuts, fruits and seeds.

    Modern mooncakes also cater to contemporary tastes: the treats are now available in flavors like taro, green tea, chocolate and ice cream. This year, Guinness even released its own flavor.

    Many communities also celebrate by making and lighting paper lanterns. Traditionally, lanterns were handmade and painted, and illuminated with candles. Today, most versions use electric bulbs. More ornate lanterns feature rattan or wooden skeletons that supports shapes like animals, stars, planets and more.

    Some neighborhoods also celebrate by hosting lion and dragon dances, where dance troupes parade through the streets to bestow luck on local residents.

    However you celebrate the harvest holiday, have a Happy Mid-Autumn Festival!
    FYI: Chinese is 中秋節 Zhōngqiū Jié
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #64
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    political desserts

    Taipan mooncakes pulled from shelves in mainland China after founder’s son denounced for supporting Hong Kong protests
    Company’s signature mooncakes taken off sale after state media denounces Garic Kwok over Facebook posts that ‘ridiculed the government and police’
    Blacklisting comes at busiest time of year for mooncake makers and one mainland importer said it would take a big financial hit as a result
    Zhuang Pinghui
    Published: 5:31pm, 2 Sep, 2019


    Garic Kwok apologised for the Facebook posts. Photo: Weibo

    Mainland Chinese retailers have stopped selling a popular Hong Kong brand of mooncakes after state media denounced the son of the founder for supporting the protests in Hong Kong.
    Taipan Bread and Cake, which is best known for its snowy mooncakes, appears to have been taken off two of the mainland’s biggest e-commerce sites Tmall.com and JD.com after Garic Kwok, a company director, was criticised in an article published in People’s Daily, the Communist Party’s official mouthpiece, on Monday.
    On Monday morning, searches for the brand results in “no relevant information” on Tmall.com, and the store could not be found on JD.com.
    Tmall is operated by Alibaba, which also owns the South China Morning Post. Both Tmall and JD have not responded to requests for comment.
    Mooncakes are traditionally eaten during the Mid Autumn festival, which falls later this month, so this is the peak season for mooncake sales.
    A staff member from Yingming Kailai Technology and Trade Development Company, which imports the cakes for mainland supermarkets and Tmall, said the product had been removed from the shelves of stores in Beijing. The items have also been taken off sale in other major cities such as Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen.
    Liu Shuting, who is responsible for store sales in the capital, said all the firm’s products had been withdrawn and the company was losing a lot of money.
    “I can’t control what Mr Kwok said. I think the products are fine but we will have to suffer a big financial loss because of what he said,” Liu said.


    Snowy mooncakes are popular at this time of year. Photo: Facebook

    The blacklisting follows an attack in party mouthpiece People’s Daily that criticised Kwok’s Facebook posts for supporting the “activities of those dressed in black”, and “forwarding pictures to ridicule the government and police, which has aroused public anger”.
    Listed as evidence were Kwok’s posts on Facebook late last week, which included a drone picture of a protest that he described as “Hongkongers forming a pro-democracy human chain across the city” and another picture that said people who supported the Hong Kong police must “have a lack of empathy … and are inferior, selfish and arrogant”.
    People’s Daily’s article has been widely recirculated by other mainland media, including the nationalist tabloid Global Times.
    Kwok apologised and deleted the posts, but could not stop the criticism from snowballing.
    “What I said and shared in Facebook is personal and not related to Taipan Bread & Cakes. I hereby apologise if they have caused misunderstanding or offended anyone,” Kwok posted on Friday.
    The apology was shared by the brand’s account on Weibo, accompanied by another statement that Kwok’s remarks did not reflect the company’s stance.
    Both apologies were badly received by mainland internet users, who criticised them for being insincere and insisted on a boycott.
    “So he basically said, I am against the mainland but I am not against making money from mainlanders,” said one Weibo user.
    “We don’t accept apologies from anyone or any organisation that erred on major issues of principle. I am warning you, if you don’t agree that you are a Chinese, just get out of China with your products and money,” wrote another Weibo user.
    Hong Kong is currently in its 13th week of anti-government protests, which have triggered a nationalistic backlash in mainland media and online.
    Many brands and celebrities, from bubble tea stores to luxury brands, have come under fire for their perceived stance on the issue.

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: Mooncakes pulled after firm’s boss denounced
    THREADS
    Happy Autumn Moon !!!
    Hong Kong protests
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  5. #65
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    oreo mooncakes

    wth?

    i'm only posting the NetShark story, not all the facebook posts. You can follow the link if you're that curious.

    Bryan Ke·September 3, 2019·3 min read
    Oreo Mooncakes Actually Exist and They Are Being Sold in Asia




    The existence of Oreo mooncakes, an Americanized take on the traditional Asian pastry, has shocked Facebook users who were curious to try the unique desserts.

    This American twist on the traditional mooncake is available at the Saigon Center Mall in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, according to the comments under Sophie Tran’s Facebook post.

    Each package comes with two pieces of Oreo Mooncakes.

    On the outside, it looks like a giant chunky Oreo.

    It is unclear if the sweet treat is entirely made of Oreo or if they added other ingredients into the mix. Tran described the Oreo Mooncake as “very sweet.”

    “It tastes like what you imagine a chocolate moon cake to taste,” she said in her response to a Facebook user.

    Traditionally, a mooncake consists of a filling made from either red beans or lotus seed paste wrapped in a thin crust. Some variants may include egg yolks or salted duck eggs.

    Orea mooncakes have existed for a few years as an exclusive product sold in Asia during the mid-Autumn Festival with past flavors like Brownie Chocolate, Double Chocolate with Milk, Strawberry Jam, and Custard and Pineapple Jam.

    The same variant this year has also popped up in Singapore as well. According to Mothership, the Oreo Mooncakes can be bought for 23.50 Singaporean dollars ($16.90).

    Each box contains four different flavors of the traditional pastry: brownie chocolate, double chocolate with milk, strawberry jam and cappuccino. However, it appears the packaging differs in each region as shown in the short unboxing clip posted by Tran.

    The product was made available via FairPrice’s website, but the listing appears to be taken down as of the time of writing.

    Featured Image via Facebook / Sophie Tran
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  6. #66
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    political desserts part 2

    Chinese importer says entire stock of Taipan mooncakes will be destroyed after backlash against Hong Kong baker
    Manager of trading company says ‘huge amount’ of Taipan Bread and Cakes brand pastries were returned after mainland media storm over bakery director’s pro-protest Facebook posts
    Zhuang Pinghui
    Published: 5:39pm, 5 Sep, 2019


    An importer for Taipan Bread and Cakes, the Hong Kong baker known for its “snowy” mooncakes, may have to destroy returned stock after a social media controversy. Photo: FACEBOOK

    A mainland Chinese importer of a popular Hong Kong mooncake brand caught up in a protest controversy said it would have to destroy stock because it could not cope with the volume of goods being returned.
    Wu Haotian, general manager of Yonghuasheng Trading, told the Southern Metropolis News that “a huge amount of mooncakes” made by Hong Kong-based Taipan Bread and Cakes had been sent back by retailers after a director of the pastry company was denounced in mainland media for supporting anti-government protests in the city.
    “The amount is so great that we haven’t calculated exactly how much have come back yet,” Wu said on Wednesday.
    He said his company had talked to mainland partners about cutting their losses.


    Taipan Bread and Cakes director Garic Kwok faced a mainland media backlash after Facebook comments about demonstrations in Hong Kong. Photo: Weibo

    “Those returned orders cannot be sent back to Hong Kong,” he was quoted as saying. “The only solution might be to destroy them eventually.”
    Phone calls to Wu at Guangzhou-based Yonghuasheng Trading on Thursday went unanswered.
    On Monday, Taipan mooncakes were pulled from shelves in mainland stores, supermarkets and online shopping sites after bakery director Garic Kwok was criticised for comments he made on his personal Facebook account last month.
    One post included an aerial photo of a protest that Kwok described as “Hongkongers forming a pro-democracy human chain across the city”. Another post said supporters of Hong Kong police must “have a lack of empathy … and are inferior, selfish and arrogant”.
    Mainland media, including Communist Party mouthpiece People’s Daily, attacked Kwok as “supporting activities of those dressed in black” and “forwarding pictures to ridicule the government and police”.
    The businessman deleted the offending posts on Friday and apologised, distancing his business from his personal views.
    Taipan, known for its “snowy” mooncakes, said on Weibo on Friday that Kwok’s views were not those of the company.
    But the damage to its reputation and business on the mainland was done.
    On Saturday, mainland retailers began demanding distributors withdraw Taipan products. First, two major online retailer sites – JD.com, and Tmall.com, which is operated by Alibaba, owner of the South China Morning Post – pulled the goods from their websites.
    Later that day, Taipan products were cleared from supermarkets and shopping malls across China.
    Yonghuasheng Trading said on Sunday that the company had not been aware of Kwok’s posts and, as a Chinese company, Kwok’s remarks did not represent it.
    “All the goods were bought with good money. Every box of mooncakes was declared to customs and tax was paid … I hope consumers understand us,” the company said.
    On Monday, Wu posted a message saying “I am Chinese” and a Chinese national flag emoji on his WeChat account.
    Months of protests in Hong Kong have triggered a nationalistic backlash in mainland media and online. Many brands, from bubble tea stores to luxury brands, and celebrities have fallen under their spotlight for their position on Hong Kong’s protests.
    THREADS
    Happy Autumn Moon !!!
    Hong Kong protests
    Gene Ching
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  7. #67
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    Zhenmeat

    Plant-based alternative meats for Chinese food – dim sum, hotpot, mooncakes and more – set for launch
    Created to be the ‘Chinese version of Impossible Foods’, Zhenmeat offers plant- and fungus-based protein products tailored for Chinese cuisine
    Founder Vince Lu says there is a big gap in China’s plant-based meat market as producers target vegetarians, not the general public who consume meat
    Elaine Yau
    Published: 6:15pm, 4 Sep, 2019


    Vince Lu, founder of plant-based alternative meat company Zhenmeat, showcasing mooncakes made with his company’s products.

    Lean, muscular and sharply dressed, Beijing-based entrepreneur Vince Lu Zhongming has come a long way from the overweight and aimless university student he was a few years ago.
    While studying materials science in the US at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Lu struggled with what to do with his life. He was eating a lot of processed meat and gained 20 kilograms (44 pounds) in a semester, leaving him unhappy with his self-image.
    A near-death experience sprang him from his funk: he lost control of his car while driving in freezing temperatures in Illinois and it crashed.
    “It was the worst accident I have ever experienced,” Lu says. “I was rescued with no injuries, but was told I had cheated death. Since then, I have been filled with gratitude. I want to value life and give back to society.”

    .
    Lu before he lost weight.

    The crash prompted him to get back into shape, revert to a healthier diet and become a regular gym goer. He studied protein properties to learn how to better fuel his workouts. After graduating he set up a start-up called Fuchouzhe, which makes protein bars to boost nutrition and sports performance.
    Based on Fuchouzhe’s success, he went further. He launched a plant-based meat start-up – Zhenmeat – with the goal of developing it into a Chinese version of US-based Impossible Foods.
    With African swine fever prompting widespread pig culls and rising calls for reduced meat consumption in China, overseas substitute meat producers are salivating over the huge China market.
    According to a report by The Good Food Institute released in May, the market size of China’s domestic plant-based meat industry in 2018 was about 6.1 billion yuan (US$850 million), 14.3 per cent higher than the previous year. The US market size that year was US$684 million, up 23 per cent over 2017.
    Although less than 10 per cent of Chinese participants surveyed as part of the report identified as vegan, vegetarian or pescatarian (fish but not meat eaters), 86.7 per cent had consumed plant-based meat products.


    Plant-based meat mooncakes from Zhenmeat.

    US plant-based meat firm Beyond Meat plans to start distributing in China in the second half of this year. Also planning a mainland China launch later this year is Hong Kong-based Right Treat, which developed pork alternative Omnipork from peas, soy and mushroom proteins. After entering the Hong Kong market last year, US-based Impossible Foods plans to launch its products in mainland China within the next two years.
    Lu’s Beijing-based start-up Zhenmeat is stealing a march on these overseas rivals, rolling out its products this month.
    “Running Fuchouzhe allows me to understand protein’s nutritional properties and supply chains. China’s breakneck economic growth has led to a big demand for quality protein,” he says.


    Peppers stuffed with Zhenmeat products being served in a Chinese restaurant.

    Ahead of the launch tomorrow (September 5), Lu has been touring China to promote Zhenmeat’s products, which include plant-based sausage and steak, and faux meat mooncakes and meatballs.
    In an April talk at the Food and Beverage Innovation Forum in Shanghai, Lu described the products as a mixture of plant- and fungus-based protein including pea, mushroom, soy and brown rice protein, with pea protein being the main ingredient.
    Zhenmeat sources organic peas from Canada. Peas have high nutritional value and contain eight amino acids – more than soybeans, Lu says, adding the other sources of protein in the products ensure they are comprehensive in nutrition. People need 18 kinds of amino acids, which single sources of beans don’t provide, he says.
    I am 180cm tall but weighed 100kg, which was quite terrible. Within a year of my diet switch, I lost 20kg. Plant-based protein is the food of the future
    Vince Lu
    While Impossible Foods’ Impossible Burger uses soy protein, pea protein is increasingly being embraced as a main ingredient for plant-based alternative meat producers. Beyond Meat uses pea instead of soy protein. California-based Ripple Foods, meanwhile, produces pea-protein alternative dairy products.
    “There’s a big gap in the plant-based meat market in China as the current Chinese plant-based meat manufacturers mostly serve the vegetarian market instead of the general public who consume meat,” Lu says.
    “The traditional vegetarian faux meat [served in Chinese Buddhist restaurants] has a heavy taste of beans. The taste, texture, colour and smell does not resemble that of real meat. The success of those American companies [like Impossible Foods] has inspired us to make plant-based meat that tastes like real meat.”


    Protein bars from Fuchouzhe.

    Lu credited the success of Impossible Foods to its use of heme, a molecule containing iron responsible for making plant-based meat taste like real meat.
    “Heme is found in animals’ blood and muscle, and also plants. No mainland meat alternative producers use heme in their products, so Chinese consumers are sacrificing the gastronomic satisfaction coming from eating meat when they consume Chinese plant-based products,” Lu says.
    Impossible Foods has secured the patent for its use of heme in its meat substitutes, so Zhenmeat is studying how to replicate heme using its own technology, which may take up to three years.
    “Currently, our products use natural flavour extracts and spices to imitate the taste of meat. Our products have higher protein content than real meat. The quality fats in our products come from coconut oils,” Lu says, adding that without heme, his products can attain only 70 per cent of the desired target for taste and texture.


    Lu sampling Zhenmeat products with a Chinese chef.

    Zhenmeat has so far secured five million yuan from Chinese investors. Unlike overseas plant-based meat producers which offer mostly burger patties and other Western food offerings, Lu says his products will target Chinese cuisine.
    “Our products will be sold online and offered in various Chinese restaurants including dim sum, Sichuan and hotpot eateries. We have no plans to expand outside China,” he says.
    Lu is convinced the business will do well, having personally benefited from cutting out meat.
    “I am 180cm tall but weighed 100kg, which was quite terrible. Within a year of my diet switch, I lost 20kg. Plant-based protein is the food of the future.”

    This article appeared in the South China Morning Post print edition as: for substitute meats, the stakes couldn’t be higher
    THREADS
    Dim Sum - dian xin
    Happy Autumn Moon !!!
    Shaolin diet, vegetarianism and stuff
    Gene Ching
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  8. #68
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    What manner of devilry is this?


    Photograph: Courtesy InterContinental Grand Stanford

    Intercontinental's Whisky Chocolate Mooncake is back for this year’s Mid-Autumn Festival
    Take advantage of the early bird special of up to 35 percent discount for orders made on or before August 31
    By Time Out Hong Kong Posted: Tuesday August 4 2020, 8:26pm

    This year, Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong has launched an array of premium mooncake collections from classic flavours to innovative whisky infused chocolate creation.

    The hotel's coveted Whisky Chocolate Mooncake ($428/box of four) is back this year, and it's sure to satiate whisky buffs and foodies alike. The signature mooncake features four different types of single-origin chocolates from Ghana, Ecuador, Vietnam, and Grenada. Each of these carefully chosen chocolates contains varying levels of cocoa and distinct characters that, when blended with the specially aged Speyside whisky, produces a unique whisky tasting experience. The whisky used for the mooncakes is aged in sherry-seasoned mini barrels at Tiffany’s New York Bar for six weeks to develop a more in-depth profile to the dram.


    Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong's premium mooncake collections

    Aside from the chocolate mooncakes, the Mini Lava Custard mooncake ($318/box of six) created by Executive Chinese Chef Leung Fai Hung is also making its debut this year. The mooncake features a velvety and luscious custard filling using premium butter and salted egg yolks from Gao You in Yangzhou City.

    Mini Lava Custard mooncake

    For those who prefer traditional flavours, there is also the classic White Lotus Seed Purée Mooncake with Double Yolk ($388/box of four) made using silk white lotus seed purée with savoury salted egg yolks.


    These festive delights come in an elegant traditional lantern design packaging that is perfect as a gift for loved ones or colleagues. Place your orders today via Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong online shop and take advantage of the early bird special of up to 35 percent discount for orders made on or before August 31. The mooncakes will be available for redemption from September 11 to October 1. Elaine Soh
    I just realized we have two threads on the Moon Festival:
    Happy-Autumn-Moon-!!! & Happy-mid-autumn-festival. Maybe I should merge?

    Also, there's my fav thread: Let-s-talk-Whisky!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #69
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    What manner of devilry is this?


    Photograph: Courtesy InterContinental Grand Stanford

    Intercontinental's Whisky Chocolate Mooncake is back for this year’s Mid-Autumn Festival
    Take advantage of the early bird special of up to 35 percent discount for orders made on or before August 31
    By Time Out Hong Kong Posted: Tuesday August 4 2020, 8:26pm

    This year, Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong has launched an array of premium mooncake collections from classic flavours to innovative whisky infused chocolate creation.

    The hotel's coveted Whisky Chocolate Mooncake ($428/box of four) is back this year, and it's sure to satiate whisky buffs and foodies alike. The signature mooncake features four different types of single-origin chocolates from Ghana, Ecuador, Vietnam, and Grenada. Each of these carefully chosen chocolates contains varying levels of cocoa and distinct characters that, when blended with the specially aged Speyside whisky, produces a unique whisky tasting experience. The whisky used for the mooncakes is aged in sherry-seasoned mini barrels at Tiffany’s New York Bar for six weeks to develop a more in-depth profile to the dram.


    Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong's premium mooncake collections

    Aside from the chocolate mooncakes, the Mini Lava Custard mooncake ($318/box of six) created by Executive Chinese Chef Leung Fai Hung is also making its debut this year. The mooncake features a velvety and luscious custard filling using premium butter and salted egg yolks from Gao You in Yangzhou City.

    Mini Lava Custard mooncake

    For those who prefer traditional flavours, there is also the classic White Lotus Seed Purée Mooncake with Double Yolk ($388/box of four) made using silk white lotus seed purée with savoury salted egg yolks.


    These festive delights come in an elegant traditional lantern design packaging that is perfect as a gift for loved ones or colleagues. Place your orders today via Intercontinental Grand Stanford Hong Kong online shop and take advantage of the early bird special of up to 35 percent discount for orders made on or before August 31. The mooncakes will be available for redemption from September 11 to October 1. Elaine Soh
    I just realized we have two threads on the Moon Festival:
    Happy-Autumn-Moon-!!! & Happy-mid-autumn-festival. Maybe I should merge?

    Also, there's my fav thread: Let-s-talk-Whisky!
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #70
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    Welcome to Golden Week

    The original article has trailers.

    From Jackie Chan’s Vanguard to Kung Fu Mulan, eight movies showing in China during golden week
    This year’s golden week box office will show how well China’s movie industry has recovered from the pandemic
    Legend of Deification is an early winner, chalking up US$11.7 million in advance ticket sales for its opening day on October 1
    Elaine Yau in Beijing
    Published: 5:45pm, 30 Sep, 2020

    Jiang Ziya in a still from animated film Legend of Deification, one of eight movies in the cinematic line-up for golden week.
    Jiang Ziya in a still from animated film Legend of Deification, one of eight movies in the cinematic line-up for golden week.
    Legend of Deification, the animated movie co-produced by the same company that made last year’s box office champion Nezha , is set to become the top grossing film on China’s national day holiday on Thursday. According to China’s largest ticketing app, Maoyan, Legend of Deification has so far chalked up 80 million yuan (US$11.7 million) in advance ticket sales for its opening day, which is also the start of the country’s “golden week” national holiday.
    Ranked second in Thursday’s advance ticket sales is patriotic movie My People My Homeland, which took in over 65 million yuan. Jackie Chan vehicle Vanguard, which opened a day earlier than Legend of Deification and My People My Homeland, reaped over 47 million yuan for advance ticket sales for Wednesday and Thursday.
    The Chinese film industry sees advance ticket sales for a film’s opening day on Maoyan as a credible gauge of audience response to a production and how it will fare at the box office in China.
    The week-long October national holiday in China usually brings rich pickings for studios, which fall over themselves to bring their best films to the big screen. Last year, golden week brought in 5 billion yuan in box office takings, more than double the 2.2 billion yuan of the previous year.


    Jackie Chan and Miya Muqi in a still from Vanguard.
    With the coronavirus outbreak largely under control in China, mainland cinemas have been reopened for two months. On September 25, the cap on seating capacity at cinemas was raised to 75 per cent.
    Industry analysts predict golden week this year will bring in 4.5 billion to 5 billion yuan in ticket sales, similar to last year’s figure, proof of the recovery of China’s cinema sector from the pandemic. Below are the eight movies which will be shown on the mainland during the golden week holiday.

    Legend of Deification
    The runaway box office success of Nezha has boosted the public’s expectations for Legend of Deification, co-produced by One and All Animation Studio, and Enlight Media which also produced Nezha last year.
    Like Nezha, which revolves around adventures of the eponymous mythological figure in Chinese folklore, Legend of Deification focuses on the exploits of Jiang Ziya, the mythological Chinese noble who helped kings Wen and Wu of the Zhou dynasty to overthrow the Shang dynasty.
    After overthrowing Shang, Jiang is at the peak of his career. About to be crowned the chief of all gods, he commits a mistake and is demoted to human status. Without his magical power, and ostracised in the human world, he embarks on a journey of salvation and self-discovery to reclaim his former glory.

    My People My Homeland
    Produced by Zhang Yimou and with Ning Hao as chief director, the film adopts the same format as My People, My Country , last year’s golden week box office champion. My People My Homeland is an anthology film comprising five chapters, each with a different director.
    Featuring A-list stars including Huang Bo and Shen Teng, the stories portray the love of mainlanders for, well, their homeland.

    Vanguard
    Hong Kong action film director Stanley Tong Kwai-lai and Jackie Chan team up in their sixth collaboration. Chan plays the chief of an international security team tasked with rescuing a hostage who has been kidnapped by mercenaries.
    Chan revealed to the media before that he nearly drowned in an accident when filming Vanguard. Since Chan and Tong started to work together in the early 1990s, they have made several hugely successful films, including Police Story 3: Super Cop and Rumble in the Bronx.

    Leap
    Released on September 25, Leap has so far earned 200 million yuan in ticket sales and 10 million yuan in advance ticket sales for Thursday. The 200 million yuan in sales puts it in ninth place on the list of 2020’s top 10 mainland films.
    Directed by Hong Kong director Peter Chan Ho-sun, Leap tells the story of the Chinese women’s national volleyball team over the past 40 years. Gong Li plays Lang Ping, the current head coach of the team. It traces how the team became world champions and defended the title in international competitions.

    Coffee or Tea?
    Produced by Peter Chan and directed by Xu Hongyu, the comedy stars heartthrobs Liu Haoran, Peng Yuchang and Yin Fang. This is an uplifting yarn about three young men who give up city comforts for the rustic life in a 1,000-year-old village in Yunnan. Beating all the odds, they set up an e-commerce business there and strike up friendships with the locals. The film will be released on October 4.

    Kung Fu Mulan
    To be released on October 3, this mainland animated version of beloved Chinese traditional hero Hua Mulan comes hot on the heels of the disastrous showing of Disney’s live-action remake. This is the first mainland animation about the historical figure.
    The Mulan in this animation differs from the Disney’s Mulan, which stuck to the traditional image of the filial and patriotic warrior.

    Let Life be Beautiful
    To be released on October 5, this movie, based on true events, portrays a young man who battles leukaemia with optimism and bravery. Faced with much uncertainty, he perseveres in pursuing his goal and dreams.
    Playing the stricken young man is 14-year-old Rong Zishan, who became a household name overnight in China recently for his starring role in hit TV series The Bad Kids. Rong’s performance as a pathos-filled student grappling with a broken family and a murderer on his back earned rave reviews from critics. In spite of being a child star, he has already worked with several famous directors, including Jia Zhangke in 2015’s Mountains May Depart .

    Kikujiro
    Released in Japan in 1999, and written by and starring Japanese film icon Takeshi Kitano, Kikujiro has taken over six million yuan in ticket sales since its September 25 release on the mainland.
    Rated 8.8 out of 10 on Douban, China’s equivalent to IMDb, the movie revolves around the adventures of a primary student who, having been raised by his grandma, decides to go to Toyohashi in Aichi Prefecture to look for his mother on his own.


    Takeshi Kitano (left) and Yusuke Sekiguchi in a still from Kikujiro (1999). Photo: Office Kitano
    After arriving in Toyohashi, the helpless child runs into a kindhearted woman who asks her layabout husband (Kitano) to help him out. The man and the kid then embark on a journey of self-discovery together.
    Threads
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  11. #71
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    Jiang Ziya FTW

    Oct 1, 2020 7:52pm PT
    China Hits Highest Single-Day Ticket Sales of the Year, Notching Its Second-Biggest National Day Earnings Ever


    By Rebecca Davis


    Courtesy of Well Go USA
    The Chinese box office hit its highest single-day tally of the year so far on Thursday, reaching $107 million (RMB728 million), more than 10 times what North American cinemas made in the whole of last weekend. That sum marks China’s second largest Oct. 1 National Day box office in history, a feat achieved even as cinemas continue to operate at just 75% capacity.

    Thursday was this year a dual holiday coincidentally marked by both the Mid-Autumn Festival and the first day of the week-long National Day vacation, typically one of the busiest times for cinemas.

    Meanwhile, to compare, the total gross for North American over the latest three-day weekend period was just $9.26 million. Relative levels of movie-going are of course tied to progress in battling the pandemic: China logged just 11 new coronavirus cases nationwide on Wednesday, whereas the U.S. logged 43,114.

    Leading China’s box office Thursday was Enlight’s hotly anticipated animation “Jiang Ziya: Legend of Deification,” a sequel of sorts from the same cinematic universe as last summer’s breakout animation hit “Nezha,” which went on to become China’s second-highest grossing film ever.

    It opened strong at number one with $52.7 million, according to data from industry tracker Maoyan — setting a record for the highest single-day ticket sales for an animated title in China of all time. It also opened Thursday in select U.S. theaters, distributed by Well Go USA.

    In second was the patriotic film purpose-made for the National Day holiday, “My People, My Homeland,” which grossed $39.3 million on its opening day. Produced by Beijing Culture, the omnibus film is executive produced by Zhang Yimou and features shorts from top directors Ning Hao, Xu Zheng, Chen Sicheng, Yan Fei, Peng Damo, Deng Chao and Yu Baimei.

    The Jackie Chan-starring actioner “Vanguard,” directed by Stanley Tong, came in third on its second day in theaters, with earnings of $8.25 million bringing its two-day cume up to $16.8 million. The film is also set to open Friday in the Ukraine and later this month in Russia via distributor Trinity CineAsia, which also holds rights in the U.K. and Ireland.

    Peter Chan’s “Leap,” which opened last week, came in fourth with $6.34 million, while “The Eight Hundred” held its own in sixth, earning $265,000 on its 42nd day in theaters.

    A propaganda documentary of the 2019 National Day military parade, a blowout to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic, debuted Thursday in seventh, earning $134,400. It was produced by China’s only military-affiliated film studio.
    Threads
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    Gene Ching
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  12. #72
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    Happy Mid Autumn Festival

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I just realized we have two threads on the Moon Festival:
    Happy-Autumn-Moon-!!! & Happy-mid-autumn-festival. Maybe I should merge?
    In honor of 2021, I just merged these two threads.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #73
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    Wind, Fire, Forest and Mountain

    Follow the link to see the video

    Martial arts dance - Shaolin kung fu
    chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2021-09-20 12:19

    This program presents the wonderful picture of dancers entering the world of murals and competing with monks, and shows the rich culture of Shaolin kung fu. It takes murals from Shaolin Temple in Central China's Henan province as its prototype, resurrected murals via XR technologies.

    Mainly filmed in the Shaolin Temple, the show featured four different scenes, namely, "Wind, Fire, Forest and Mountain", to present the magic of Chinese kung fu. The inheritance and development of kung fu is also shown through interactions between dancers, monks and today's youth.

    It's part of Henan Satellite TV's special program for the Mid-Autumn Festival, "Mid-Autumn Wonderful Tour".
    Threads
    Yet-another-Shaolin-Modern-Dance-crossover
    Mural-painting-in-Shaolin-Temple-showing-monks-practicing-kung-fu
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    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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