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Thread: The Karate Kid

  1. #256
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghostexorcist View Post
    This may turn out to be a good movie, but I refuse to go see it. Jackie Chan is pretty much the Asian Samuel L. Jackson now. He'll do anything for a paycheck.
    lol if only he said motherfucekr in every movie too...
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  2. #257
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    Have you really kept up with Jackie, ghostexorcist?

    I only knew of a few of these projects, and I follow Jackie pretty closely.
    Jackie Chan keeps busy schedule
    English.news.cn 2010-05-27 07:11:17
    by Randy Williams

    LOS ANGELES, May 26 (Xinhua) -- Beginning with a starring role in the new "Karate Kid" film which Sony releases across America June 11, Jackie Chan will have his hands full in the foreseeable future with plans to either produce or star in eight feature films and a pair of television dramas.

    The popular franchise of Karate Kid films, which earned Pat Morita a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination in the 1984 version, takes a turn in this latest installment. The story goes to China where Chan, as Mr. Han, a maintenance man who is secretly a master of kung fu, aims to install a lesson that kung fu is not about punches and parries, but maturity and calm, to a transplanted 12 year old from Detroit.

    Through his Jackie&JJ Productions and JC Group China companies, Chan also plans to star in four projects and look to present new performers and filmmakers in producing several other stories as well as directing one himself.

    One of those young stars is actress Lin Peng who will be showcased in a martial arts picture entitled "Drunken Master 1945. " While it will be similar in spirit to Chan's 1987 hit "Drunken Master," it is not categorized as either a sequel or remake.

    Scheduled to begin in February, the 15-million-dollar movie will be directed by Mark Sui Fai who co-wrote and co-directed " Infernal Affairs."

    Chan kicks his producing efforts into high gear for a Mandarin- language romantic comedy, "The Break Up Artist," Steve Woo, who also directed the English version that featured Amanda Crew will helm this one as well.

    This film will star Lin in a story about a young woman who runs an agency that helps couples break up. Lin currently stars opposite Chan in his latest picture, "Little Big Soldier."

    Other films Chan plans to produce include another romantic comedy directed by Woo. "Letter with No Return" begins production in October.

    Further down the road Chan then returns to the suspense genre with Ge You starring in "Magic Master."

    The filmmaker has starring roles on his schedule as well.

    Beginning in early 2012, Chan will be featured in "Cambodia Landmine," an action dramedy. The 25-million-dollar production will be directed by Ding Sheng ("Little Big Soldiers").

    Later that year comes a 3-D action drama to be directed by Tsui Siu Ming. The 50-million-dollar Mandarin-language drama is called "Tiger Mountain."

    Chan will perform double-duty starring and directing in a 55- million-dollar action movie. Filming in both China and the United States, "Manhattan" is scheduled to be released in January 2013.

    In addition to producing and starring in motion pictures, the superstar is also looking into expanding his reach in the distribution side of the business by increasing the Jackie Chan Theater chain into several dozen outlets throughout China.
    Here's another person fixated on the karate issue. Don't these people watch trailers? The bully denigrates Jaden by calling him "Karate Kid" right in the middle of it.
    The F.U. Kid
    Jason Chin on 05.26.10 at 1:00 PM

    On June 11th, The Karate Kid remake, starring Jaden Smith and Jackie Chan, will open in theaters and that's dumb.

    Of course, the Hollywood mentality of remake after remake is annoying but this one is especially so. They hire Jackie Chan and set the movie in China. Fine. Karate, however, is a Japanese martial art. Jackie Chan is a practitioner of kung-fu, a Chinese martial art. Why not The Kung-fu Kid? Do you think there are hardcore fans of the original that will boycott the remake? Will Ralph Macchio use his power to destroy your new movie?

    Jackie Chan says in his blog that Dreamworks registered the word "kung-fu" (for Kung Fu Panda) and they have to use The Karate Kid title. Sure. Hey, that's like saying the producers of Die Hard now own the word "Die" and no other movie can use it. The official website says that the Kid knows some karate and gets beat up and so is derisively called The Karate Kid by the mean Chinese kids before he learns kung-fu from Chan. That makes sense then. Using that logic they should rename Superman, "Exploding Planet Baby" and Batman "Traumatized Orphan Man." Overseas the movie will be known as The Kung-Fu Kid.
    So, shame on you Columbia Pictures and shame on you, Jackie Chan for just cashing another check. You suck.
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  3. #258
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    The New Karate Kid

    Has any0ne seen any of the trailers. I've hear Jacky Chan does some Wing Chun in the movie..
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  4. #259
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    Our new issue drops today

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  5. #260
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    ouch

    Rain's theme kicks ass on Bieber. Asia's version is going to better all around.

    Click for link to vid.
    ‘Never Say Never’ by Justin Bieber
    By Jennifer Hudock on May 31st, 2010

    Canadian teen superstar Justin Bieber teamed up with the star of the upcoming Karate Kid remake, Jaden Smith, to record a video for a title from the soundtrack for the film called “Never Say Never.”

    Smith provided back-up vocals for the single, and in the video it shows the two boys working side by side in the recording booth.

    Bieber announced the video via his YouTube and Twitter profile, just in time for the June 11, 2010 release of the film.

    The Karate Kid remake is really only a remake in the sense that it features a young boy in difficult, new surroundings after he and his mother move. This time, it’s to China, where he finds himself face to face with Kung Fu bullies. The super in his building won’t be Mr. Miyagi this time, but Kung Fu action hero, Jackie Chan.

    I am looking forward to this movie, I really am. I grew up with the Karate Kid and have been a fan of Jackie Chan since Half a Loaf of Kung Fu, so this promises to be exciting. Plus, it’s directed by Will Smith, so it can’t be all that bad.

    Now, go watch Justin Bieber, cos you know you want to.
    Justin Bieber sings 'The Karate Kid' theme song
    June 1, 2010, 1:59pm

    Music world’s current teen sensation Justin Bieber follows up his No. 1 hit “Baby” with his latest single “Never Say Never,” the theme song of Columbia Pictures’ new action adventure “The Karate Kid” starring the legendary Jackie Chan and Jaden Smith, son of Hollywood superstar Will Smith.

    The energetic song, which also features Jaden Smith in back-up vocals, is played during the end credits of the highly anticipated movie. Aside from co-writing the song, Bieber and Jaden Smith also share screen time in the music video that recently premiered online to deafening buzz.

    Bieber posted a link to the video for “Never Say Never” on his Twitter page May 31 - quickly rocketing it into the social networking site's trending topics.

    “Never Say Never” is co-written by Adam Messinger, Nasri Atweh, Thaddis Harrell and Omarr Rambert. The record is produced by The Messengers, with vocals produced by Kuk Harrell, with additional rap vocals produced by Omarr Rambert.

    In “The Karate Kid,” 12-year-old Dre Parker (Smith) could have been the most popular kid in Detroit , but his mother’s (Taraji P. Henson) career takes them both to China . Dre has a hard time making friends at first but he does make a connection with his classmate Mei Ying – and the feeling is mutual – until cultural differences make such a friendship impossible. Even worse, Dre makes an enemy of the class bully, Cheng. Dre knows only a little karate, and in the land of kung fu, Cheng puts “the karate kid” on the floor with ease.

    Feeling alone in a foreign land, Dre has no friends to turn to except the maintenance man, Mr. Han (Chan). Secretly a master of kung fu, Mr. Han and Dre begin to train together, building a friendship and moving toward a final showdown with Cheng at a kung fu tournament. As Han teaches Dre that kung fu is not about punches and parries, but maturity and calm, Dre learns that facing down the bullies will be the fight of his life.

    Opening across the Philippines on Friday, June 11, “The Karate Kid” is distributed by Columbia Pictures, local office of Sony Pictures Releasing International.
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  6. #261
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    Advanced screening tomorrow night

    As some of you know already, we have access to an advanced screening of THE KARATE KID tomorrow at 7PM in San Jose, CA. All of our volunteer staff for Tiger Claw's KungFuMagazine.com Championship II are invited. In fact, we will be holding a short volunteer meeting immediately after the screening.

    Well, I have a few extra. Want to go? Here's what you do. IM me here. If you can go, you'll have to pick up the tickets here at the Tiger Claw office, 40740 Encyclopedia Circle, Fremont, CA 94538, within the next 22 hours.

    I only have a few extras and I'm putting the word out to several people. It's first come, first serve.
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  7. #262
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    Korea gets the first review

    I'll get the second. We'll be at a screening tonight. Still no takers on our extra passes. We only have a few extra, so be quick if you want one.
    Thu, Jun 03, 2010
    The Korea Herald/Asia News Network
    Smith steals show in 'Karate Kid' reboot
    By Song Woong-ki

    THE Smiths might be on the cusp of beginning an acting dynasty. Will and Jada's son Jaden turns in a star making performance in the reboot of "The Karate Kid" -- an inspirational family film both kids and fans of the original will get a kick out of.

    The remake of the much loved but schmaltzy 1984 family film that popularized Karate as much as it ushered in a litany of jokes about its practitioners retains much of the inspirational charm of the original.

    Jaden Smith echoes the young Ralph Macchio -- the star of the original.

    He convincingly exudes both confidence and the social awkwardness that comes with pre-adolescents settling into a new environment.

    However, this time around the film ups the stakes by taking Dre -- its 12-year old hero from Detroit -- to the Far East with his mom after she gets transferred to a Beijing auto plant by her American employers.

    Dre's mother is played endearingly by Taraji P. Henson, even though her main role is to provide comic relief.

    In the first film Ralph Macchio portrayed a New Jersey teen who moves with his single mother to Los Angeles.

    By setting the story in modern-day China, the original fish-out-of-water plot becomes magnified, making way for a far more compelling drama.

    Here, Smith turns in a convincing performance of a boy also struggling to adapt in a completely foreign world, where he can only communicate with hand gestures.

    Immediately upon his arrival, Dre gets into a scuffle with a posse of local bullies led by its Kung-fu savvy leader Cheng (Zhenwei Wang) after he is spotted flirting with a girl Cheng secretly has a crush on.

    The new version has almost the same structure of the original. Dre is constantly picked on until Mr. Han (Jackie Chan), the apartment maintenance man, takes him under his wing to train him for a kung-fu tournament, where the young Dre and his nemesis ultimately meet.

    Chan, popular for his action spectacles featuring stunts no sane man would ever take part in, is a revelation throughout the film.

    Perhaps his best dramatic performance to date, his portrayal of a man haunted by personal demons is done with subtlety and restraint.

    It's not a "look at me I can cry on screen" type of role some might expect from some of Chan's contemporaries of the 80s and 90s.

    His dramatic chops might get fans wanting to see more of him in this kind of role in the future. This is to be expected as his face and physical stature shows clear signs of wear and tear from decades of stunt work.

    And in films such as these, it is inevitable -- even required -- that there would be its fair share of training sequences. And this is where it is obvious that Chan is no longer the man who used to jump across sky rises without safety harnesses.

    The obligatory training montages are done with epic scope featuring some breathtaking scenery shot around some of Beijing's key landmarks, such as the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, and an almost ethereal Wudang Mountain where Dre learns to "control oneself."

    As one might imagine after such romantic portrayals of the Chinese landscape, the film is a co-production with the state-run China Film Group and Columbia Pictures.

    The former contributed a reported $5 million to the production's $40 million budget.

    For years, Sony Pictures considered and then decided against re-launching the franchise as the studio had by then pounded the series into submission.

    The third installment, 1994's "The Next Karate Kid" starred a 19-year-old Hilary Swank which was both a commercial and critical disaster.

    So when Will Smith's Overbrook Entertainment pitched Sony on a remake featuring Smith's 11-year-old, martial-arts-obsessed son Jaden, the studio remained unconvinced.

    It was only when China was factored in just before the kick-off of the Beijing Olympic Games that the studio gave the green light, seeing the box office potential for an emerging Chinese film market.

    There's more riding on the film than most people realize.

    Although the film's production formed the biggest movie co-production between an American studio and China, it also conceded to government-mandated control of its content -- resulting in two slightly different cuts of the final version.

    Chinese censors requested that several scenes, including sequences of bullying and a kiss between Dre and his Chinese love interest, be left on the cutting room floor.

    But even without the Chinese government-enforced deleted scenes, the film's authenticity remains untouched.

    -The Korean Herald/Asia News Network
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  8. #263
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    **** wish i could fly to cali today to get them passes...sucks sucks sucks!!!and nobody is taking them...****

  9. #264
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    Actually, I've given out three passes today

    I still have a couple more. They'll be gone soon tho.

    It's tough to get here on such short notice - Fremont is off the beaten path - so it's sort of a last minute perk, I know. Still, we're a long way from the KFM flash mob.
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  10. #265
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    Kung fu just stole a crown jewel from karate

    When I think of karate films, there's not too much. There's Chiba's stuff, but that's fairly obscure unless you're really into the genre. Then there's Karate Kid, which defined the genre in America in the '80s. Now Karate Kid is a kung fu film. I know, I know, every martial artist has his gi-gusset in a bunch because it's 'karate' not kung fu, but as a kung fu practitioner, I can't but sit back and grin at this one. The Karate Kid dismisses that controversy with a wax-on, wax-off wave of the hand, and its on with the story.

    Karate Kid 2010 has several nice homage scenes to the original, and the ending is exactly the same, so overall, it's not surprising. Jaden, Jackie and Taraji deliver solid performances, although unlike Morita's Mr. Miyagi, there's never any doubt that Jackie's Mr. Han is a total ass-kicker. The remake, like any remake, lacks the element of surprise. But still, Jaden is charismatic in the role, and Jackie handles his dramatic parts well. I was hoping that there would be more depth to Mr. Han's tragedy, something involving the Cultural Revolution perhaps, as Miyagi's grief stemmed from WWII injustices - the internment and such - but the film played a politically-neutral card there, which is just as well as like I mention in our the cover story of our latest issue, this is not about Hollywood. It's about the international release. This film is positioned to do very well in America, but it's poised to be huge in China. Even the credits are Chinese/English from start to finish. I'd like to see the Chinese version now, as they will surely tweak it a little, as mentioned in the Korean review above.

    As for the action, it's actually more pro wrasslin' than kung fu or karate. Jackie delivers a signature bit of choreography - the lone fight scene. Like I said, the ending is the same, note-for-note, except a snake is swapped for a crane.

    It's a great postcard of China. Beijing is portrayed well, with all its clutter and crowds, only everything is really close. Sure you could train on the Great Wall, but it's an hour+ taxi ride out of Beijing. And Wudang is called Dragon Well, which we all know is in Zhejiang, not Hubei. But none of that really matters.

    Ultimately, I think this is a better film than the original in that it's more global. There's a subtle race issue, very subtle, but it's more like the original in being about being a stranger in a strange land, an innocent dealing with bullies. Of course, I'm very biased as its set in China. On a professional level, I think it will be great for our industry. It's funny, poignant, and generally entertaining summer film fare. Go see it when it comes out. It's definitely worth supporting.
    Gene Ching
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  11. #266
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    I doubt I will bother to see it, I have to be honest.
    Part of the reason is the ridiculous title and the other part is that I knoe how it ends and don't care.
    Not a good thing for a movie.
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  12. #267
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post
    I doubt I will bother to see it, I have to be honest.
    Part of the reason is the ridiculous title and the other part is that I knoe how it ends and don't care.
    Not a good thing for a movie.
    I think you'll end up seeing it. I'm not going to try to resist, I've found it futile.
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  13. #268
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    Interesting take on it

    Goldstein sees the Chollywood angle in part with this picture. It's a bit slanted, but at least he sees it. If you don't get that angle, you don't understand where Asian cinema is at right now at all.
    The Big Picture
    Patrick Goldstein on the collision of entertainment, media and pop culture
    Is the China of 'The Karate Kid' the real China?
    June 3, 2010 | 5:38 pm

    I took my son to see "The Karate Kid" Wednesday night and I found myself with a lot of explaining to do. Don't get me wrong, we had a good time, since if you're a stone-cold Jackie Chan fan, like my 12-year-old, its worth the price of admission to see Chan give a nicely nuanced, almost totally effortless performance as a mysterious maintenance man who turns out to be a canny kung fu instructor, teaching a forlorn American kid (played by Jaden Smith) how to find himself by mastering the art of kung fu.

    If you've only seen Chan mug his way through the "Rush Hour" movies or breathtakingly defy gravity in Hong Kong classics like "Super Cop: Police Story 3," the role is a treat, since he gives a remarkably restrained performance, walking slowly and gingerly, like a man who's broken nearly every bone in his body, then rousing himself into action when wrongs must be righted.

    But back to my original point: Why did I have so much explaining to do?

    First off, as my kid asked afterward, if the movie is all about kung fu, why is it called "The Karate Kid"? He's seen the original 1984 "Karate Kid," so he has kind of figured out that the movie is a brand, but still -- why not call it "The Kung Fu Kid"? At least it would be accurate, since almost any 12-year-old can tell the difference between kung fu and karate. I had to explain that in Hollywood, brand trumps accuracy and authenticity every time, which is why -- according to this recent story by my colleague John Horn -- when Sony tried to change the title, the film's producer, Jerry Weintraub, said essentially, no dice. (He also produced the original.)

    Speaking of Weintraub, the film offers an intriguing lesson in Hollywood insider politics. My son is a huge Will Smith fan, so he knows that Smith is one of the biggest stars in the business. On the other hand, he's never heard of Weintraub, who's more of a behind-the-scenes force in the industry (but not so behind the scenes that he hasn't been all over TV and radio recently shilling for his memoir, "When I Stop Talking, You'll Know I'm Dead: Useful Stories From a Persuasive Man"). So how was it possible that, when it came to display the film's producer credits, that the biggest star in Hollywood had to share a crowded credit block with his wife, Jada Pinkett Smith and his production company partners, James Lassiter and Ken Stovitz, while Weintraub got a producer credit block all to himself?

    Ah, my son, that is a sign of true power in action. I'm betting that Smith and Co. tried to negotiate a better credit-block deal, but once again, Weintraub said, no dice.

    But the brand that gets the best treatment in the movie is the brand of China. For Sony, the idea of having the film set in China was a huge inducement to make the film, since it gave the studio the opportunity to bolster the film's enormous global appeal. Finding a way to have your summer movie play in China is a rare opportunity indeed, since the country is so restrictive that it only allows roughly 20 non-Chinese movies into its theaters each year. By cutting China's state film arm into the action -- China Film put up $5 million, roughly 1/8 of the movie's budget -- Sony was allowed to actually film in China, even in such normally inaccessible locations as the Great Wall and the Forbidden City.

    Of course, in return, China clearly had veto power over any issues involving the film's portrayal of the country. I know that "Karate Kid" is intended as pure entertainment, but it operates as a wonderfully organic propaganda tool for China, presenting a largely sanitized version of the country. There are no political dissidents, no shots of environmental disasters, no one trying in vain to reach thousands of restricted Internet sites.

    Although there is a plot wrinkle involving a pack of teenage bullies who prey on Jaden's character, the rest of the populace is portrayed as happy, contented and well-fed, without any complaints, even about the unbearable air and the hideous traffic. The parks are full of people exercising and playing sports, the schools are full of well-mannered, upwardly-mobile kids. Jaden's romance with a local Chinese girl is as chaste as anything you'd see on the Disney Channel (though as Horn's story points out, not chaste enough for the Chinese censors, who made the filmmaker cut out a teeny-tiny kiss between the kids for the Chinese version of the film).

    So if Sony benefits by getting access to the huge Chinese market, China benefits too, by having its society presented in the film as it was during the Summer Olympics, as a benign place of wondrous growth and unlimited potential.

    I had only one other small piece of explaining to do. After the film was over, my son said, "Dad, that was a really good movie, but why was it soooooo long?" (By our count, it was well over 2 hours.) I didn't really have a good answer for that, since, well, like so many other movies these days, there really was no good reason for it being that long. All I could say was: "I guess if you have to go all the way to China to make your movie, you want to get your money's worth."
    Gene Ching
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  14. #269
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    I have seen the the previews. I can't say that he is doing Wing Chun. Pretty much all of Kung Fu shares certain elements, but I don't see any resemblance to WC beyond that.

  15. #270
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    Take off the jacket = Bong I think..

    Looks like a hodgepodge of KF with some Chun in it..but he's a karate kid...
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