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Thread: Asian Film Festivals and Awards

  1. #1
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    Asian Film Festivals and Awards

    Asian Film Festivals have been on the rise in America. One of the leading Asian Film Festivals has been The San Francisco International Asian Film Festival, which has been going now for a quarter century. We've discussed Taipei's Golden Horse Film Festival and UK's Dragon Den Film Festival here in the past. Now our martial media columnist, Dr. Craig Reid is at the 8th San Diego Asian Film Festival. Check out his coverage of the event in his new article SAN DIEGO ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL: The See-World of Festivals, exclusively on KungFuMagazine.com.

    NOTE: SDAFF has since been split into its own indie thread. See San-Diego-Asian-Film-Festival
    Gene Ching
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    16th Golden Rooster and Hundred Flowers Film Festival in Suzhou

    Gene Ching
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    Very cool! Did you get a chance to see Finishing the Game yet?

    Do you know who Kip Fulbeck is? I think some of his work may interest you.
    http://www.seaweedproductions.com/wo...iews.aspx?id=9
    http://www.seaweedproductions.com/wo...iews.aspx?id=2
    The 10 Elements of Choy Lay Fut:
    Kum, Na, Gwa, Sau, Chop, Pow, Kup, Biu, Ding, Jong

    The 13 Principles of Taijiquan:
    Ward Off, Roll Back, Press, Push, Pluck, Elbow, Shoulder, Split, Forward, Back, Left, Right, Central Equilibrium

    And it doesn't hurt to practice stuff from:
    Mounts, Guards, and Side Mounts!


    Austin Kung-Fu Academy

  4. #4
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    Meanwhile, here in SF

    Most notable for us here would be Banquet, Flashpoint and Invisible Target.

    hmm, where's our Invisible Target thread? doug?

    Asian Film Festival expands
    G. ALLEN JOHNSON
    Sunday, November 4, 2007

    As long as it has existed, the 4 Star's annual San Francisco Asian Film Festival has been an upstart event on the city's film festival calendar - no corporate advertising, an eclectic lineup of movies and perennially confused in many moviegoers' minds with the bigger, better-funded Asian American Film Festival that takes place in March.

    For the 10th festival, 4 Star owner Frank Lee decided to think bigger. For the first time, the event will open and close at the Castro Theatre, beginning Thursday with a pre-film party and a movie that will need every inch of the Castro's big screen to do it justice: "Genghis Khan: To the Ends of Earth and Sea," a Japanese take on the Mongol warrior that was filmed on location in Mongolia and cost $30 million (which means it would have cost more than $100 million in Hollywood). It topped the box office earlier this year in Japan.

    "It's about time to expand," says Lee, whose festival runs through Nov. 18. "The time was right. We've been around for 10 years now, and we wanted to try something different."

    Part of Lee's new muscle comes from his partnership with the San Francisco Korean American Film Festival, which contributed 21 Korean films to the mix and is marking this festival as its fifth edition. Ten of those films will be shown for free at the Coppola Theatre on the San Francisco State campus.

    But Korean films are just part of the equation. There are 40 movies in all, from seven countries. With titles such as the Japanese for-mature-audiences-only "The Strange Saga of Hiroshi the Freeloading Sex Machine," the Thai horror film "Sick Nurses" and the Korean comedy "200 Pound Beauty," it's obvious that, despite the new trappings, the festival hasn't lost its edge.

    Some other highlights:

    -- "Confession of Pain": This Hong Kong police drama-action movie reunites Tony Leung, currently burning up the art-house screen in "Lust, Caution," with his "Infernal Affairs" directors, Andrew Lau and Alan Mak. Like "Infernal Affairs," which was remade by Martin Scorsese as the best-picture Oscar winner "The Departed," Hollywood is negotiating for the remake rights to "Confession." Another Lau-Mak action film, "Initial D," also shows in this festival.

    -- "Tuya's Marriage": Although it played in October at the Mill Valley Film Festival, it's good to see this Chinese-Mongolian co-production on the schedule. The winner of the top prize at the Berlin Film Festival in February, it's about a woman, married to a disabled man, who starts across the desert to find a new husband who can support her - and her first husband.

    -- "The Banquet": Considering the star power of Ziyi Zhang and the impressive production values of this martial-arts fantasy, it's amazing this Chinese film, co-starring San Francisco native Daniel Wu, has yet to receive American distribution. It was nominated for seven awards at the Hong Kong version of the Oscars, and it is deservedly the closing-night film at the Castro.

    -- "Nanking": Co-directed by Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman and headed for a U.S. release, this American film looks at the 1937 rape-and-murder rampage of occupying Japanese forces in Nanking and the Westerners who tried to help the Chinese victims. It stars Hugo Armstrong, Rosalind Chao and Woody Harrelson.

    -- "Barking Dogs Never Bite": Although made in 2000, this irresistible comedy about one man's extreme quest to silence a neighbor's dog is on the schedule because of the sudden popularity of director Bong Joon-ho. Since this film, he made "Memories of Murder" and "The Host," and, like the latter film, "Barking Dogs" contains a satisfyingly oddball performance by actress Bae Doo-na, who plays a sort of apartment vigilante.

    -- "A Flower in Hell" and "Marines Who Never Returned": These two films, from 1958 and 1962, respectively, provide an invaluable look at Korean society during and just after the Korean War. "Flower" is about a black marketeer and a prostitute, who will do anything to survive; and "Marines" details a South Korean platoon that must hold off advancing Chinese troops.

    Other highlights: Two new Hong Kong action movies, one starring Donnie Yen ("Flash Point"), the other a film by Benny Chan ("Invisible Target"), in which the director insisted that all the stunt work be done by the actors; rare screenings of the 1934 Chinese silent "The Goddess" (starring Ruan Lingyu) and "Sopyonje," a 1993 film about Pansori singers (directed by Im Kwon-taek) that is considered one of the great Korean films of all time; and the Peter Chan musical "Perhaps Love," which opened last year's San Francisco International Film Festival.

    "The films obtained for this festival are more genre pictures," says Lee, who is also restoring his Presidio Theater in the Marina district and will reopen it in December. "Most of these films were box-office hits in their own countries."

    In other words, lower the brow and pass the popcorn. That upstart festival is back.

    10th Annual San Francisco Asian Film Festival: Movies will screen Thursday through Nov. 18 at the Castro, 4 Star and Coppola theaters in San Francisco. $6-$18. (415) 666-3488, eastraordinary-cinema.com, brownpapertickets.com.
    Gene Ching
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    invisible target

    i'm working on it its been sitting on top of my dvd player along with fatal contact. i just saw dog bite dig give me a chance gene **** lol.

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    Asian Film Awards

    Man, I'm waaaay behind. I haven't seen any of these...

    'Lust, Caution,' 'The Warlords' lead Asian Film Awards nominations

    HONG KONG - Ang Lee's spy thriller "Lust, Caution" and Peter Chan's historical epic "The Warlords" led with six nominations each in the shortlist for the second Asian Film Awards announced Thursday.

    Other top contenders include Jiang Wen's "The Sun Also Rises," with five nominations. The Japanese movie "I Just Didn't Do it" and South Korea's "Secret Sunshine" each had four in the event organized by the Hong Kong International Film Festival.

    "Lust, Caution," about the affair between an undercover student activist and the Japanese-allied spy chief in Second World War-era Shanghai, and "The Warlords" are both up for best film and best director.

    The lead actors from "Lust, Caution," Tony Leung Chiu-wai and Tang Wei, also were nominated for top acting awards.

    "The Warlords" star Jet Li is also competing for best actor along with South Korean Song Kang-ho from "Secret Sunshine," who won in the same category last year for the monster thriller "The Host," and Ryo Kase from "I Just Didn't Do It," about a young man fighting sexual harassment charges.

    Song's co-star from "Secret Sunshine," Jeon Do-yeon, is up for best actress, along with Korean-American actress Kim Yun-jin from the hit U.S. TV. show "Lost" and veteran Chinese actress Joan Chen.

    Jeon already won Cannes best actress last year for "Secret Sunshine," in which she portrays a woman's mental breakdown after moving to her husband's hometown following his death in a traffic accident, only to face the kidnapping and murder of her son.

    The winners will be announced at an awards ceremony in Hong Kong March 17.

    The Hong Kong film festival launched the Asian Film Awards last year in an attempt to add lustre to the event, which is facing growing competition from other film festivals in the region, most notably the Pusan International Film Festival in South Korea.

    The awards ceremony was one of two pan-Asian film awards that debuted last year, along with the Asia Pacific Screen Awards, organized by Australia's Queensland state government, the International Federation of Film Producers Associations, broadcaster CNN and UNESCO.

    The Hong Kong International Film Festival Society Chairman Wilfred Wong said the budget for the Asian Film Awards was increased by about one million Hong Kong dollars (US$128,000) from last year to about HK$10 million ($1.3 million) this year.

    The Asian Film Awards also added best supporting actor categories this year.

    Wong said the budget for the overall Hong Kong Film Festival increased by several million Hong Kong dollars to HK$40 million (US$5 million). For comparison, the Pusan International Film Festival was budgeted at 7.4 billion Korean won ($7.8 million) last year.

    Asked about Pusan's bigger budget, Wong said he welcomed more Hong Kong government funding but that "even though we have less money, we work very efficiently."

    The Hong Kong film festival will run from March 17 to April 6.

    List of nominees for the 2nd Asian Film Awards

    HONG KONG - A list of nominees in top categories at the 2nd Asian Film Awards announced Thursday in Hong Kong:

    Best film: "Buddha Collapsed Out of Shame" (Iran), "I Just Didn't Do It" (Japan), "Lust, Caution" (Taiwan-China-United States), "Secret Sunshine" (South Korea), "The Sun Also Rises" (China-Hong Kong), "The Warlords" (China-Hong Kong).

    Best director: Peter Chan ("The Warlords"), Jiang Wen ("The Sun Also Rises"), Ang Lee ("Lust, Caution"), Lee Chang-dong ("Secret Sunshine"), Masayuki Suo ("I Just Didn't Do It"), Zhang Lu ("Desert Dream").

    Best actor: Jack Kao ("God Man Dog"), Ryo Kase ("I Just Didn't Do It"), Tony Leung Chiu-wai ("Lust, Caution"), Jet Li ("The Warlords"), Song Kang-ho ("Secret Sunshine"), Joe Odagiri ("Tokyo Tower: Mom and Me, and Sometimes Dad").

    Best actress: Joan Chen ("The Home Song Stories"), Jeon Do-yeon ("Secret Sunshine"), Kirin Kiki ("Tokyo Tower: Mom and Me, and Sometimes Dad"), Kim Yun-jin ("Seven Days"), Deepika Padukone ("Om Shanti Om"), Tang Wei ("Lust, Caution").
    Gene Ching
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    Asian American Film Festival SF

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Asian Film Festivals have been on the rise in America. One of the leading Asian Film Festivals has been The San Francisco International Asian Film Festival, which has been going now for a quarter century. We've discussed Taipei's Golden Horse Film Festival and UK's Dragon Den Film Festival here in the past. Now our martial media columnist, Dr. Craig Reid is at the 8th San Diego Asian Film Festival. Check out his coverage of the event in his new article SAN DIEGO ASIAN FILM FESTIVAL: The See-World of Festivals, exclusively on KungFuMagazine.com.
    Brings a smile to my face Gene. And a frown at the same time

    While I was in the Bay Area before, I was fortunate enough to catch it at the Kabuki 8 in Japan Town. I remember watching Jeff Adachi's The Slanted Screen. Mr. Adachi had a little Q&A session before and after. He's very personable and was open to suggestions.

    I don't remember any martial art flicks in the line up back then...

    Unfortunately I won't be able to make it this year as I am not there at the moment. (Reason for the frown)

    Do you plan to attend? The line up looks like it would be enjoyable.
    Cordially yours,
    冠木侍 (KS)
    _____________________________________________


    "Jiu mo gwai gwaai faai dei zau" (妖魔鬼怪快哋走) -- The venerable Uncle Chan

    "A fool with a sword is more dangerous than any weapon..."

    “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”--John Quincy Adams

    "If you have an unconquerable calmness, you can overcome the enemy without force" -Bushi Matsumura

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    I assume you mean SFIAAFF?

    And not the Asian Film Awards. Funny how the SFIAAFF site rolled over, updated for the new year. That keeps the opening post pretty current. I wish I could attend both, of course, but it's unlikely I'll attend either. I haven't been to SFIAAFF in years. I almost went when they showcased Finishing the Game, but something came up at the last minute.
    Gene Ching
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    Sfiaaff

    Yes, that was the one I was referring to...because out of all the ones you mentioned, it is the only one I was familiar with. Even having been in the Bay Area, San Diego was still a trek for me.

    I was just wondering if you were going to cover any screenings. Of course I realize that you have a busy schedule. Thanks for replying.
    Cordially yours,
    冠木侍 (KS)
    _____________________________________________


    "Jiu mo gwai gwaai faai dei zau" (妖魔鬼怪快哋走) -- The venerable Uncle Chan

    "A fool with a sword is more dangerous than any weapon..."

    “If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.”--John Quincy Adams

    "If you have an unconquerable calmness, you can overcome the enemy without force" -Bushi Matsumura

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    26th Asian American Film Festival

    Not to be confused with the 11th San Francisco Asian Film Festival coming later this year, we presume...

    SF's Asian American Film Festival starts this week.

    26th Asian American Film Festival
    G. ALLEN JOHNSON

    It's fitting that Wayne Wang is the main honoree at the 26th San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival. The director made his name with Asian-themed films such as "Chan Is Missing" and "The Joy Luck Club," but has shifted effortlessly to Hollywood, where he directed Jennifer Lopez and Ralph Fiennes in "Maid in Manhattan" and Queen Latifah in "Last Holiday."

    And yet, to get his passion projects made, such as his opening-night film, "A Thousand Years of Good Prayers" - about an Americanized daughter whose father visits, disapprovingly so, from China - he must join forces with Asia for valuable partnerships.

    "After working in Hollywood, it was like I had to relearn how to make films," Wang said at a festival news conference at the Sundance Kabuki last month. "I hadn't made an Asian-themed film in 15 years, or an independent film in quite a while (2001's "The Center of the World")."

    That kind of re-education is becoming more commonplace. Across the United States, Asian filmmakers and actors are not banking solely on Hollywood enlightenment or American money to realize their dreams.

    Actress Joan Chen, like Wang a San Francisco resident, has acted alongside Peter O'Toole, Rutger Hauer, Christopher Walken, Tommy Lee Jones, Sylvester Stallone and Michael Caine. Twenty years after "The Last Emperor" won best picture and established her as a star in the United States, she's logging frequent-flier miles to Asia and beyond - her performance in the festival's closing-night film, "The Home Song Stories," was turned in Down Under for Australian Chinese director Tony Ayres.

    "It is more vibrant now," Chen said of the Asian film business. "And hopefully, in China, the censorship will become a rating system."

    And Hollywood? Most of Chen's stateside work has come in the independent arena.

    "I did turn a couple of (American) independent films down, but there aren't a lot of big studio offers at all," she said.

    Daniel Wu can relate. Born and raised in the Bay Area and a graduate of the University of Oregon, Wu has become an A-list star in Asia. His Hong Kong-Chinese film "Blood Brothers," a big-budget gangster saga, plays at the festival.

    "Having lived there for 10 years, I feel more Hong Kong than American," said Wu, who is scheduled to appear at a panel discussion at the festival called "Crossing Over: Asian Americans and Asia." "Because basically my maturing years have been spent in Hong Kong. ... You see it from a third-party perspective, and you see it differently than we do."

    Perhaps most striking about the latest trend is the cooperation between independent filmmakers and Asia. Korean companies in particular are jumping into the fray; they have poured significant money into two New York-shot American independent films with Korean themes being shown at the festival: Michael Kang's "West 32nd" and Gina Kim's "Never Forever."

    "Never Forever" especially shows the dichotomy between Asians and Asian Americans. Caucasian actress Vera Farmiga ("The Departed") plays a character who is married to a Korean American businessman and is unable to get pregnant. To get the baby she thinks will save their marriage, she enlists the help of a Korean illegal immigrant, hoping to pass off any offspring as her husband's.

    "It was a big plus to see something so daring - if I may say - to see explicit sex scenes between a Caucasian woman and an East Asian man," said Kim, who was born in South Korea, taught at Harvard and is now based in New York. Kim got her script to noted Korean director Lee Chang-dong, which proved to be a stroke of good fortune.

    "We got some money from Prime Entertainment, one of the biggest studios in Korea, and also got substantive money from the government - grant money from the Korean Film Council," Kim said.

    Other examples of East-West collaborations include a fascinating documentary about kamikaze pilots, "Wings of Defeat," in which Japanese American Risa Morimoto is able to draw some surprising revelations from former kamikaze-trained pilots. That Morimoto is American and female might have helped the men - who live in a society that does not encourage frankness - to open up.

    Anthony Gilmore might have had a similar advantage when he spoke to former Korean sex slaves in his "Behind Forgotten Eyes," narrated by Yunjin Kim - an actress who has bounced from Korea ("Shiri") to Hollywood (the TV series "Lost").

    No wonder festival director Chi-hui Yang said at the news conference that he and his crew had thought better of dropping the "international" from the festival's official name, even though "it's one of the longer festival names out there."

    Assistant festival director Taro Goto is even going so far as saying Asian Americans now have an advantage in some aspects of the entertainment field, thanks to the new paradigm. As he writes in an essay published in the festival program, "Their cross-cultural perspective gives them versatility and the ability to transcend national borders, which translates into both cultural and commercial value."

    Lest you think this is a new phenomenon, consider the festival's retrospective programs.

    Once again the festival is visited by Anna May Wong, the patron saint of Asian American crossover film artists. The Los Angeles-born actress who became a noted star in American silent films and shot to larger fame working in German and British silent films is the subject of a new documentary, Elaine Mae Woo's "Anna May Wong: Frosted Yellow Willows."

    But most fascinating is the case of Sacramento-born singer-dancer Betty Inada, one of a wave of Japanese American jazz artists who became stars in Japan in the 1930s.

    "Whispering Sidewalks" (1936), which plays Saturday at the Castro, was Japan's first musical.

    Inada plays an American singer-dancer who goes on tour in Japan but is swindled by her managers. Penniless, she casts her lot with a group of struggling musicians, singing songs such as "La Cucaracha" and "Blue Moon" along the way.

    More than 70 years later, going global is noble once again for Asian American artists.

    San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival: Thurs.-March 23. Sundance Kabuki, Castro and Clay theaters in San Francisco; Pacific Film Archive in Berkeley; and Camera 12 Cinemas in San Jose. (415) 865-1588, asianamericanmedia.org/2008. For G. Allen Johnson's festival picks, go to sfgate.com.
    Gene Ching
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    Asian Film Awards in Hong Kong

    Haven't heard about Secret Sunshine, but it doesn't sound like my kind of flick...

    SKorea shines at Asian film awards
    12 hours ago

    HONG KONG (AFP) — South Korea dominated the Asian Film Awards for the second year running, with "Secret Sunshine", a tragic movie about death and faith, taking home three top prizes including best picture.

    "Secret Sunshine" -- the story of a widow who moves to her dead husband's hometown with her son, and then turns to evangelical Christianity when her child is abducted and murdered -- also won for best director and actress.

    South Korean actress Jeon Do-Yeon, who won the top acting prize at last year's Cannes film festival for her performance as the suffering woman, again took home top honours in Hong Kong late Monday.

    "This is beyond my expectations," she said.

    "Secret Sunshine" director Lee Chang-dong bested Taiwan's Ang Lee, whose erotic World War II spy thriller "Lust, Caution" went home with just one award -- a best actor trophy for Hong Kong veteran Tony Leung Chiu-wai.

    The South Korean director said he had come to the gala event in Hong Kong to celebrate Jeon's work, and never expected to take home the awards for best film and director.

    "I'm a very happy man now," he said.

    The Asian Film Awards, organised by the Hong Kong International Film Festival, are aimed at showcasing the depth of talent in the region.

    At last year's inaugural event, South Korea also blitzed the field, with smash hit monster flick "The Host" -- the story of a mutant monster spawned by toxic waste released from a US military morgue -- winning four prizes.

    On Monday, Chinese-American veteran Joan Chen won best supporting actress honours for "The Sun Also Rises", while China's Sun Honglei was named best supporting actor for his work in "Mongol", about the life of Genghis Khan.

    Best screenwriting honours went to Au Kin-yee and Wai Ka-fai for "Mad Detective", another cop flick from prolific Hong Kong director Johnnie To.

    Liao Pen-jung won the trophy for best cinematography for "Help Me Eros", while Cao Jiuping, Zhang Jianqun won for best production design for "The Sun Also Rises".

    India's Vishal Dadlani and Shekhar Ravjiani were named best composers for "Om Shanti Om", David Richardson was crowned best editor for "Eye In the Sky" and the prize for best visual effects went to Ng Yuen-fai for "The Warlords".

    More than 30 films from across the region vied for the 12 prizes.

    Veteran Japanese director Yoji Yamada, best known for the light-hearted human dramas of his "Otoko wa Tsurai yo" ("Tough to be a man") series that started in 1969, took home the Special Lifetime Achievement Award.

    The series features iconic character Torajiro Kuruma, a warm-hearted but hapless travelling salesman who is constantly falling in love with women and getting his heart broken.

    Yamada, 76, made 48 movies about the salesman, played by late film legend Kiyoshi Atsumi, until 1995.
    Gene Ching
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    I enjoyed both Warlords and CJ7

    Still haven't seen The Assembly yet...

    "Assembly," "CJ7" up for Students' Favorites
    2008-03-27 08:27:10 CRIENGLISH.com
    Lucrative Chinese films of the past year, such as "The Assembly," "The Warlords," and "CJ7," are among the 36 final competitors for this year's Beijing Student Film Festival.

    The films not only include box-office leaders, but also small-budget films that have not had as big an influence in the theaters, Xinhua news agency on Thursday quoted the festival committee as saying.

    The 36 candidates were selected from a record-setting 104 submissions, according to the festival's Web site. Genres span action, war, comedy and art-house films.

    Other notable nominations include "In Love We Trust," "Ganglamedo," and "My Left Hand."

    The 15th annual Beijing Student Film Festival will run from April 6 to 26. Nominated films will be screened in several local universities, where students will choose their favorite film, director, actor and actress.

    Other major awards for Best Film, Director, Actor and Actress will be decided by a judge panel of professionals and students.

    The Beijing Student Film Festival is growing in popularity as filmmakers are seeing a potential market among college students.
    Gene Ching
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    Somewhat related

    An event my friend is organizing. If you are in the Portland area, feel free to PM me and I will keep you updated. We will be having a fundraiser dinner to help get this off the ground, if you are interested I will let you know when and where.

    "About the organization that I am with it's called Thymos, and it is created to give more awareness of Asian Americans in the media and the misrepresentations they show as being accurate. Well that is part of what we do, the other part is helping to improve the status of Asian Americans by showing that we are a multi-ethnic group and not just a monolithic entity. A way to do this is to have an event showing how Asian Americans have overcame certain difficulties but still reach a glass ceiling whether it be in social or academic events. A way to break this ceiling is spthe event that Thymos is going to put on in June. The event will have two main parts, the first is to show the progression of Asian American studies over the last forty years , since this is the 40 year anniversary of Asian American Studies. The second part is having two speakers here to actually talk about the progression of Asian American Studies and also the independent film arena. The speakers are Frank chin and Curtis Choy. I will attach you some links so that you have a better idea of who they are. So far we have a some success in gathering support and fundraising however we still need more help.

    The event will most likely take place at OHSU because we have a contact there. We are expecting to have a full attendance and the room can hold up to 150 people.

    Here are some links to the people who are coming.
    Frank Chin
    - http://www.enotes.com/drama-criticism/chin-frank
    - http://www.bestwebbuys.com/Frank_Chi...b-authorsearch (these are the books he has written)
    Curtis Choy
    - http://www.chonkmoonhunter.com/ (this is his production company and the films/documentaries he had made)

    Curtis Choy made a documentary about Frank Chin talking about Frank Chin called "What's wrong with Frank Chin?" and that film will also be another part of the selling point."

  14. #14
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    Asian Excellence Awards

    The Asian Excellence Awards will be held on 4/23/2008 at Royce Hall at UCLA

    OUTSTANDING TELEVISION ACTRESS
    Yunjin Kim Lost ABC
    Lucy Liu Cashmere Mafia ABC
    Parminder Nagra ER NBC
    Sandra Oh Grey’s Anatomy ABC
    Lindsay Price Lipstick Jungle NBC
    Navi Rawat Numb3rs CBS
    OUTSTANDING TELEVISION ACTOR
    Naveen Andrews Lost ABC
    Daniel Dae Kim Lost ABC
    Masi Oka Heroes NBC
    Sendhil Ramamurthy Heroes NBC
    B.D. Wong Law & Order: SVU NBC
    SUPPORTING TELEVISION ACTRESS
    Moon Bloodgood Journeyman NBC
    Michaela Conlin Bones Fox
    Janina Gavankar The L Word Showtime
    Mindy Kaling The Office NBC
    Michelle Krusiec Dirty Sexy Money ABC
    Sonja Sohn The Wire HBO
    SUPPORTING TELEVISION ACTOR
    James Kyson Lee Heroes NBC
    Rex Lee Entourage HBO
    Will Yun Lee Bionic Woman NBC
    Ken Leung Lost ABC
    Kal Penn House M.D. Fox
    James Saito Eli Stone ABC
    OUTSTANDING FILM ACTRESS
    Devon Aoki War
    Joan Chen Lust, Caution
    Vanessa Hudgens High School Musical 2
    Sharon Leal This Christmas
    Maggie Q Balls of Fury
    Tang Wei Lust, Caution
    OUTSTANDING FILM ACTOR
    Naveen Andrews The Brave One
    Jackie Chan Rush Hour 3
    Chow Yun-Fat Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End
    Tony Leung Lust, Caution
    Jet Li War
    Lee-Hom Wang Lust, Caution
    OUTSTANDING FILM
    Finishing the Game Dir Justin Lin
    Lust, Caution Dir Ang Lee
    Rush Hour 3 Dir Brett Ratner
    War Dir Philip G. Atwell
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Midgard
    Posts
    10,853
    why is rush hour 3 on that list? the director listed is a whitey

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