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Thread: Shaolin Temple & Buddhism

  1. #46
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    Shaolin coffee - nice!

    There used to be a French pastry & coffee shop past just before the Aviary. I only remember that being there for a year or two. They had decent coffee, or so I'm told. I never tried it. That was independent however - privately owned - and it was removed early during the relocation.

    Shaolin has its official line of tea. We used to carry it here. In fact, I have some of the containers right next to me on my desk. Some of the tea boxes were absolutely gorgeous.

    There used to be a vegetarian restaurant for the public inside Shaolin Temple. That's actually fairly common in Buddhist temples. I never ate there either.

    I need to get back to Shaolin. It's been too long since I've been there.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by RenDaHai View Post
    Its on the right side of the entrance, It is actually a tea house but inside is done up all modern. They do coffee as well. It leads into the new shopping area inside the hall of steles. where they sell unique shaolin merchandise, even expensive shoes specialy branded shaolin, clothes, lots of books and all kinds of other stuff (even a shaolin brand meditation tent). TO the left of the temple is the new shaolin medicine shop, that is actually pretty cool. If you want to get into the temple you can simply walk in through the medicine shop or the tea house for free! At least you could last year, december was the last time I went inside, I live in Kaifeng now.

    As much as i hate it being inside the temple the new little shopping area actually sells some pretty cool stuff, and some good books that you can only buy in that one gift shop, only after going inside shaolin si. If you missed it you missed out on some good souvenirs.
    I didn't miss it. I saw the meditation tent. I almost bought that gold sword but, kinda funny, shaolin si doesn't take visa. They do take Discover though. I bought quite a lot from the gift shop. Our masters though kept telling us not to and giving us stuff for free, like insence. Two of our students would only eat in the vegie cafe, is that where the coffee was? I got a lot of stuff at the temple but you can't haggle over prices there, had much more fun doing that in Dengfeng. The medicine shop was cool. However, one of my brothers jammed his thumb during training and the medicine didn't help him. Our Master Yan Wen ended up driving him and another of my brothers into Dengfeng to see this back alley doctor who ended up being this old lady who ended up diging her fingers deep into his joint causing him excrutiating pain. Wished they would have brought a video camera for that trip. When they got back and told their story we were all rolling on the ground laughing.

  3. #48
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    Haha,

    Yeah thats the place. It was only finished late last year. I don't think it really goes with the style of shaolin.

    Yeah they do coffee,

    The books are the best buy at the gift shop, they are quite uniqe, only wish I could read chinese.

  4. #49
    Quote Originally Posted by Citong Shifu View Post
    I was wondering if any of you were aware that throughout Shaolin's 1500 year history, Buddhism "WAS NOT" the only religion / philosophy taught or practiced?

    "Maybe not in recent years", but confisianism, daoism, confisian/daoist hybrid mixes, muslim, etc all had been the doctrines of the Shaolin Temple. Even christianity has seen its day at the S. Temple...

    The reason I bring this up is that Modern Shaolin Temple (PRC & SS) has shoveled this under the rug, so to speak, and have forbid others to speak the truth concerning this issue.

    Just curious about this.

    CS
    Very interesting, but i have to say this is totally misleading, let me rephrase, totally
    wrong... to us Chinese,
    Shaolin Temple is where the origins of Buddhism can be found in China, when
    it first arrived from India.

    Seriously, tell this to anyone in the Asian countries and they will laugh and will
    not even bother to question it. If you will seriously study the differences, and
    including picking up the Chinese language, the differences between what you
    have stated will be very clear.
    Last edited by -木叶-; 10-02-2009 at 01:35 PM. Reason: Rephrase misleading to wrong :)
    "In fighting, the hand you can see will not hurt you, the hand you cannot see, will hurt you." - Grandmaster Gary Lam

  5. #50
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    Isn't Malawi where Madonna gets her kids?

    Monday November 23, 2009
    In the spirit of love
    By FOONG THIM LENG

    Venerable Hui Li’s mission to propagate Buddhism in Africa is bearing much fruit.

    VENERABLE Hui Li was branded a devil and a “poisonous weed” by the locals in the early days of his missionary work in South Africa.

    “I was condemned by the local people, government officials and people of other faiths. They did not know what Buddhism is and have not seen a Buddhist monk in robes before,” he said.

    He faced protest from the local church and local residents over the building of a Buddhist temple in Bronkhorstspruit, near Pretoria.

    However, he remained adamant on his undertaking despite threats that his temple would be seized by the government.

    “I had to remain calm, and practise patience and kindness before I could overcome the obstacles,” he said in an e-mail interview.

    To prove his sincerity and to win over the people, Ven Hui Li carried out charity events and assisted the sick and poor by distributing clothing, food and medicine.

    Known as the African Monk, Ven Hui Li has vowed to devote five lifetimes to develop and propagate Buddhism in Africa.
    Building strong minds: The children also get to learn and practise meditation.

    Born in Pintong county, Taiwan, in 1955 to poor farming parents, Ven Hui Li learned early that life is fragile. His school was located next to a cemetery and the frequent funeral processions left a deep impression on him.

    In 1987, he became a student of Master Hsin Yun, the founder of the Fo Guang Shan Buddhist Order, and was ordained a monk a year later.

    In 1992, to fulfil Master Hsin Yun’s vow to build a Fo Guang Shan temple on every continent, Ven Hui Li volunteered to go to South Africa to build the first Mahayana Buddhist temple on African soil.

    He arrived in South Africa, a total stranger, and it took him weeks of travelling around and hardship to get a clearer view of the country. At one stage, he contracted malaria but he did not falter in his determination to serve Africa.

    “If you don’t get malaria, you have not got your passport to work in Africa,” he quipped.

    In 1994, the African Buddhist College (the first Buddhist seminary in Africa) opened at Nan Hua Temple in Bronkhorstspruit to teach Buddhist scriptures and practices to young men with the aim of helping them alleviate their problems through education.

    When he visited Malawi in 1998 to make a donation of wheelchairs, Ven Hui Li became aware that 40% of the population was HIV-positive and over one million children had lost one or both parents to AIDS. He realised that there would be a whole generation of orphaned children, who, if they reached adulthood, would have no proper upbringing and very little education. Thus was born the concept of Amitofo Care Centres (ACC).
    On a mission: Ven Hui Li and 30 of his young charges from the Amitofo Care Centre will be in Malaysia for the Spread The Seeds Of Love charity event.

    Ven Hui Li abdicated the abbotship of Nan Hua Temple in 2001 to dedicate himself fully to his work in Africa, earning himself the reputation of being the Albert Schweitzer of Mahayana Buddhism.

    Following successful negotiations with Malawi’s First Lady, the late Ethel Mutharika, a piece of land just outside Blantyre, in southern Malawi, was donated for his project.

    Construction of the first ACC began in 2003. Generous donors, mainly from Taiwan, provided financial support. By 2005, the first stage of construction was completed and 120 children aged between three and 12 moved in. By 2008, the Malawi Care Centre was looking after nearly 300 orphans and children of single parents.

    At present there is a preparatory school which is occupying one of the hostel blocks until a school for about 500 kids can be built. Next on the agenda is the building of a high school and a centre for vocational training. There is a clinic run by two care mothers, qualified nurses, and volunteers from abroad.

    Kung fu is the special skill taught at the Blantyre Care Centre as a cultural exchange programme. About 100 children practise kung fu taught by masters from the Shaolin Temple in Henan, China, to instil discipline, tenacity and focus.

    The children attend service every morning and receive Buddhist teachings.

    The ACC also assists other community-based organisations in the surrounding district that support over 2,000 children and more than 1,500 adults.

    ACC has branches in Harare (Zimbabwe), Nhlangano (Swaziland), Mafikeng (Lesotho) and Yaound (Cameroon). There are plans to set up centres in Zambia and Tanzania next.

    ACC needs about US$12mil a year to achieve its goals.

    Ven Hui Li and 30 children from the centre will be visiting Malaysia and Brunei on a charity tour entitled Spread The Seeds Of Love from Nov 28 to Dec 30.

    They will stage charity performances in Ipoh, Penang, Johor, Petaling Jaya, Kuantan, Kuala Lumpur, Kelantan, Muar, Malacca, Kota Kinabalu, Miri, Bintulu, Sibu and Kuching.

    The main organisers of the tour are Persatuan Anak-anak Yatim Eduwis Selangor, NSS Centre (a charity organisation in Ipoh) and Hai Tao Foundation. Entry to the performances is by invitation card.
    Solid stances: Children at the Amitofo Care Centre in Malawi get to learn kung fu taught by masters from the Shaolin Temple in China.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #51
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    Interesting statement at NPC

    I wonder if this is fallout from the stock option debacle.
    Shaolin Abbot calls for social harmony
    By Wang Ke

    Buddhism shares with traditional Chinese culture a deep reverence for the value of harmony, and its doctrines promote social accord and world peace, the abbot of the Shaolin Temple told China.org.cn.

    As a religion with "profound ideas of harmony and a concept of peace," Buddhism can help prevent conflict among people, promote social accord and harmony between man and nature, Shi said.

    Buddhism took root in China after being introduced from India more than 2,000 years ago. There are now more than 100 million Buddhists in China.

    Shi said Buddha's vision of peace is more relevant than ever before, and called on people everywhere to work together towards the common goal of a harmonious and peaceful world.

    "As a responsible country, China has its own profound beliefs and vision for the promotion of world harmony," he said. "Religious beliefs are one of the important social forces from which China draws strength."

    He said that throughout history Buddhism had helped avert conflict and preached a doctrine of peace among people and between humanity and nature.

    "All schools of Buddhist are equal and co-exist peacefully and amicably. And Buddhism has become an important channel for international cultural exchange," he told China.org.cn.

    While Buddhism values unity over division, there is a deep-rooted acceptance of the concept of difference and variety in all aspects of life. Its philosophy of selflessness, charity, respect, equality and tolerance naturally leads it to promote and safeguard world peace, Shi said.

    Shi said that at this year's session of the NPC he was planning to introduce legislation to protect traditional Chinese culture, and in particular the unique Buddhist traditions of the Shaolin Temple.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    I wonder if this is fallout from the stock option debacle.
    http://www.smallisbeautiful.org/budd...s/english.html


    BUDDHIST ECONOMICS
    by E. F. Schumacher



    " "Right Livelihood" is one of the requirements of the Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path. It is clear, therefore, that there must be such a thing as Buddhist economics.

    Buddhist countries have often stated that they wish to remain faithful to their heritage. So Burma: “The New Burma sees no conflict between religious values and economic progress. Spiritual health and material well-being are not enemies: they are natural allies.” 1 Or: “We can blend successfully the religious and spiritual values of our heritage with the benefits of modern technology.” 2 Or: “We Burmans have a sacred duty to conform both our dreams and our acts to our faith. This we shall ever do.”

    All the same, such countries invariably assume that they can model their economic development plans in accordance with modern economics, and they call upon modern economists from so-called advanced countries to advise them, to formulate the policies to be pursued, and to construct the grand design for development, the Five-Year Plan or whatever it may be called. No one seems to think that a Buddhist way of life would call for Buddhist economics, just as the modern materialist way of life has brought forth modern economics. ..."

  8. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by kfson View Post
    http://www.smallisbeautiful.org/budd...s/english.html


    BUDDHIST ECONOMICS
    by E. F. Schumacher



    " "Right Livelihood" is one of the requirements of the Buddha’s Noble Eightfold Path. It is clear, therefore, that there must be such a thing as Buddhist economics.

    Buddhist countries have often stated that they wish to remain faithful to their heritage. So Burma: “The New Burma sees no conflict between religious values and economic progress. Spiritual health and material well-being are not enemies: they are natural allies.” 1 Or: “We can blend successfully the religious and spiritual values of our heritage with the benefits of modern technology.” 2 Or: “We Burmans have a sacred duty to conform both our dreams and our acts to our faith. This we shall ever do.”

    All the same, such countries invariably assume that they can model their economic development plans in accordance with modern economics, and they call upon modern economists from so-called advanced countries to advise them, to formulate the policies to be pursued, and to construct the grand design for development, the Five-Year Plan or whatever it may be called. No one seems to think that a Buddhist way of life would call for Buddhist economics, just as the modern materialist way of life has brought forth modern economics. ..."
    It appears that Burma has collectively read "The Secret" and are now actively exercising the techniques expressed in it. Or at least, using it for an excuse to become rich...
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #54
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    sort of OT

    Shaolin Temple offers benedictional Laba congee to visitors
    11:17, January 12, 2011


    China's Shaolin Temple in Henan Province offers free benedictional Laba congee to visitors on Jan. 11, 2011, the Laba Festival, which is also the date of the Sakyamuni Buddha's enlightenment. (Photo: chinanews.com)

    China's Shaolin Temple in Henan Province offered the benedictional Laba congee to visitors on Jan. 11, 2011, which is the day of the Laba Festival according to the Chinese lunar calendar.

    The Laba Festival, which falls on the eighth day of the 12th month of the Chinese lunar calendar, commemorates the date of Sakyamuni Buddha's enlightenment. The tradition of eating Laba congee is believed to bring good fortune.

    By Ye Xin, People's Daily Online



    China's Shaolin Temple in Henan Province offers free benedictional Laba congee to visitors on Jan. 11, 2011, the Laba Festival, which is also the date of the Sakyamuni Buddha's enlightenment. (Photo: chinanews.com)
    Laba is fresh rice boiled to a porridge, with some fruits and nuts.
    Gene Ching
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  10. #55
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    This is dated but I was on vacation so I didn't get to it until now

    I received these emails from Shaolin last week. I'm posting them here strictly for archival sake.

    To all Shaolin overseas culture centers and disciples,

    To mourn for the victims of recent earthquakes and send prayer and relief to the disaster-stricken regions, Shaolin Temple will hold a world disaster pray and relief aid event, which is due to commence on April 5, 2011.

    On behalf of the temple and the abbot, we are calling forth a global prayer by performing an incense offering ritual in all Shaolin overseas culture centers and voluntarily light the incense of mercy from heart for relief aid of disaster-stricken people. Meanwhile, Shaolin Temple has dedicated itself to collecting online dedications, messages and blessings.

    We sincerely invite all Shaolin overseas centers to join in the event and send us your prayer messages, pictures and news for this event, which are to be released on Shaolin Website.

    ***

    Expiate sins of the dead and pray luck for the living

    On February 22, 2011, a 6.3-magnitude quake struck New Zealand; March 10 a 5.8-magnitude quake hit the China Yunnan province; March 11, a great 9.0-magnitude earthquake and the tsunami hit in the Northeast Japan. The impermanence of the universe caused thousands of victims and the heaven and living were deeply touched with Buddha’s mercy.

    Ven. Shi Yongxin, abbot of Shaolin Temple together with monastic and lay Buddhists will be presided a prayer for heavenly peace on The upcoming occasion of Qingming Festival(April 5)..Meanwhile, Ven. Shi Yongxin appeals the Shaolin disciples of the world to cultivate earnestly by “offering Incense of Love from heart and blessing the universe from Buddha”. Sutra states: Dhama offering is the most sincere one among all the offerings. May all the shaolin disciples of the world keep “pity without cause and mercy for the same nature”to expiate the dead and pray luck for the living beings. Buddha bless the world peace and human happiness.

    Lets recite the following :
    Na Mo Ben Shi Shi Jia Mou Ni Fo
    Na Mo Ben Shi Shi Jia Mou Ni Fo
    Na Mo Ben Shi Shi Jia Mou Ni Fo
    (Adhere to our fundamental master Buddha Sakyamuni)
    Gene Ching
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  11. #56
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    Shaolin Temples varied in the philosophy they subscribed to. For example, the Honan (Henan) Temple was mainly a Ch'an (Zen) Buddhist Temple, which is to be expected since it was the birthplace of Ch'an. The Fukien and Omei Temples had strong philosophical (as opposed to the religious side) Taoist tendencies. Philosophical Taoism is not incompatible with Ch'an. In the article Gene posted from Shaolin the Abbot speaks of harmony. This is definitely a Taoist tenet that was adopted. Emulation of the animals in Wugong was also a Taoist concept in seeking harmony with nature.

    Keep in mind, that with the exception of perhaps one temple the monks were all Buddhist Ch'an monks. Their philosophies, beliefs and teachings were flavored by the teachings of the great sages, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Mencius, and Chuang Tzu. But Christianity and Islam were not influences that I am aware of.
    May Peace Be With You

  12. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sifu Bok Se Teung View Post
    In the article Gene posted from Shaolin the Abbot speaks of harmony. This is definitely a Taoist tenet that was adopted.
    Almost every religion speaks of harmony. Why does it have to be that one adopted it from another? You mean Buddhism didn't teach about harmony until it came in contact with Taoism?

    Emulation of the animals in Wugong was also a Taoist concept in seeking harmony with nature.
    Using animal inspired techniques to fight more effectively has nothing to do with harmony with nature. It's fighting. Fighting is not harmonious, but rather destructive. The inventors of such styles were firstly martial artists.

    Keep in mind, that with the exception of perhaps one temple the monks were all Buddhist Ch'an monks. Their philosophies, beliefs and teachings were flavored by the teachings of the great sages, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Mencius, and Chuang Tzu. But Christianity and Islam were not influences that I am aware of.
    What makes you think they were influenced by these characters? What, for example, was something incorporated into Chan Buddhism from these guys that was not already present in Chan through its Indian lineage? And what is the historical evidence for your claim?

  13. #58
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    <<Using animal inspired techniques to fight more effectively has nothing to do with harmony with nature. It's fighting. Fighting is not harmonious, but rather destructive. The inventors of such styles were firstly martial artists.>>

    No, not really. They were "firstly" contemplative men of demonstrated the power of that contemplation by developing a martial art inspired by natural forms. Like the advertising says "To chinese it is the place buddhism came in from India".
    "The perfect way to do, is to be" ~ Lao Tzu

  14. #59
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    Before proceeding, can we name these "contemplative men", or is it just romanticism?

    The previous poster was talking about animal styles in Shaolin. That would trace back to one Bai Yufeng, who was "firstly" a martial artist before ever coming to Shaolin and ordaining.

    Furthermore, most of the martial arts material in Shaolin also came externally from military generals who used it as necessity in actual combat, not to "be in harmony with nature". In Shaolin it was used by monk soldiers also for defending the monastery and serving the country. It was by all means "fighting". Romanticize it as you like.

  15. #60
    shaolin knows why modern people come to their temple, and tell them what they want to hear.
    Last edited by bawang; 04-24-2011 at 07:58 PM.

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