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  1. #151
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    Our freshest exclusive web article

    Gene Ching
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  2. #152
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    coffee to tea...

    Replacing Coffee With Green Tea Affects Your Body In These 6 Ways, Experts Say
    By JR THORPE
    Dec 1, 2019


    Lars Mensel / EyeEm/EyeEm/Getty Images

    Coffee is one of America's favorite beverages — a survey published in 2018 found that 64% of the nation drinks at least one cup every day — and a hot steaming espresso in the morning can be one of life's greatest joys. However, coffee isn't your only choice for morning caffeine. Green teas, which are created by treating fresh tea leaves with steaming or gentle heating, have less caffeine in them than black teas or coffee, but enough to give you a boost. They also have a host of other health benefits. If you're looking for a way to perk up in the morning but are increasingly dissatisfied with coffee, switching from coffee to green tea might be a great option.

    There isn't one uniform type of green tea; there are a lot of varieties, including those with added flavors like flowers or herbs. Smoky, roasted green teas like hojicha taste very different from steamed teas like sencha because of their method of production — and leaf teas taste much better than anything you get in a teabag. (Sorry, but it's true.) However, all green teas have particular ingredients and compounds that can affect your health. If you're interested in switching over from coffee to green tea in the mornings for your dose of caffeine, here's what might happen.

    1. You'll Be Ingesting Less Caffeine — If You Don't Drink Matcha


    Lorenzo Antonucci/Image Source/Getty Images

    You may have heard that tea contains more caffeine than coffee, but that's only half the story. "At its core, tea leaves contain more caffeine than coffee beans," Dr. Edo Paz, M.D., a cardiologist at online health consultancy K Health, tells Bustle. "However, once both are brewed, the amount of caffeine in coffee exceeds that in tea."

    The amount of caffeine you ingest from green tea depends on a lot of things: the variety you choose, whether it involves leaf tips or buds (which contain more caffeine), and whether it's powdered or uses whole leaves. Matcha, the popular powdered tea, has a much higher caffeine content than leaf green teas, because a single cup of it contains many more ground-up leaves than a cup of leaf tea. If you drink matcha in the mornings rather than coffee, you'll be ingesting more caffeine than you once did. If, however, you stick to the non-powdered varieties of green tea, your caffeine intake will drop, which can cause withdrawal symptoms.

    "If you drink a lot of coffee, you may get headaches when you try to cut back," Dr. Paz says. Switching from coffee to green tea may not cause all the symptoms of caffeine withdrawal, because green tea still contains approximately 20 to 30 milligrams of caffeine per cup. If you're switching from very strong double espressos to one cup of green tea, though, you may experience headaches, irritability, difficulty concentrating and lack of focus for a short time until your body adjusts.

    2. You Might Help Anxiety & Sleep Issues

    Cutting back on caffeine levels by drinking green tea may help lower anxiety and improve sleep, particularly if you happen to be sensitive to caffeine. "The higher caffeine content of coffee may negatively impact people who are sensitive to caffeine," Ramzi Yacoub, the chief pharmacy officer at SingleCare, a prescriptions service, tells Bustle. "They may experience anxiety, insomnia, and heart effects like increased heart rate or blood pressure."

    If this sounds familiar, it might be worth lowering your caffeine levels by switching over to green tea. The change could help decrease your body's anxiety response and reduce symptoms of caffeine over-stimulation — while still giving you enough of a caffeine boost to get going in the morning.

    3. You'll Ingest More Antioxidants


    Jurga Po Alessi/Moment/Getty Images

    Green tea also contains various compounds and ingredients that can help our immune systems, fight off infection, and lower our risk of diseases. "Another benefit of tea is the amount of antioxidants it contains," Dr. Paz tells Bustle. "While coffee also has its fair share, tea typically has a higher concentration." Green tea in particular has a variety of antioxidants that have been shown to have health-boosting properties, and has a higher antioxidant content than coffee.

    One of the most studied antioxidants in green tea are the catechins, a compound found abundantly in tea, cocoa, and berries. Catechins have been shown in studies to have antimicrobial properties, and a review of science published in 2010 found that they've also been shown to lower cardiovascular disease risk, help prevent degenerative diseases, and assist with kidney and liver function. Catechins have also been implicated as a possible way to lower the risk of breast and other cancers, but as with a lot of dietary science, the possibility that green tea is a cancer-buster is hugely individual. Just switching from coffee to green tea won't automatically change your cancer risk.
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  3. #153
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    Continued from previous post

    4. You May Reduce Inflammation

    Inflammation, which is the immune system's response to threats and stress, is a key factor in keeping you healthy, but it's also a component in a lot of health conditions, particularly when it won't go away. Persistent low-grade inflammation has been linked to heart conditions, rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, degenerative illnesses and various cancers, according to research published in 2018.

    Enter green tea. A study in 2018 found that green tea has serious anti-inflammatory properties; in other words, it's capable of reducing inflammation levels, because it stimulates the body's anti-inflammatory responses and calms the immune system down. Coffee can also reduce inflammation levels, but its anti-inflammatory properties are lower than those of coffee. If you have chronic low-grade inflammation, you may find that green tea can help more than coffee does.

    5. It May Be Better For Your Oral Health


    Jurga Po Alessi/Moment/Getty Images

    Switching from coffee to green tea may be an unexpected boost for your mouth. Coffee can heighten your risk for the gum infection periodontitis, according to a large study published in PLoS One in 2018, and also increases your risk of tooth staining. Green tea, however, seems to have benefits. A study published in Oral Chemistry in 2016 found that its anti-microbial properties might reduce the risk of certain harmful bacteria building up in the mouth over time.

    Switching over from coffee to green tea may also help the bacterial population in your mouth in general. We all have an oral microbiome; it's a collection of bacteria and other living things in our mouths that can help or hinder its health. A study published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention in 2018 found that tea drinkers had a more varied microbiome in their mouths than coffee drinkers, complete with higher amounts of helpful bacteria. That could help prevent infections and general oral issues. Tea might change your mouth for the better.

    6. You'll Still Reap The Benefits Of Caffeine

    Caffeine can have serious benefits, even in the small amounts you get from green tea. Scaling your caffeine intake down rather than going cold turkey means that you can still reap some of those benefits. "Caffeine is an effective stimulant to help improve physical performance and mental alertness," Yacoub tells Bustle. "In some studies, caffeine has also been shown to reduce type two diabetes." Harvard Medical School notes that in small doses caffeine has also been shown to help protect against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's. A little caffeine a day may prove to be helpful to your health in the long run.

    If you're thinking of making the move from coffee to green tea, research indicates that you may be looking at improved health outcomes in the future. It's definitely worth considering swapping your espresso for a cup of sencha. Just don't pour boiling water over green tea leaves; it scorches them. Take it from a devotee.

    Studies cited:

    Bhupathiraju, S. N., Pan, A., Manson, J. E., Willett, W. C., Dam, R. M. V., & Hu, F. B. (2014). Changes in coffee intake and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes: three large cohorts of US men and women. Diabetologia, 57(7), 1346–1354. doi: 10.1007/s00125-014-3235-7

    Chacko, S. M., Thambi, P. T., Kuttan, R., & Nishigaki, I. (2010). Beneficial effects of green tea: a literature review. Chinese medicine, 5, 13. doi:10.1186/1749-8546-5-13

    Fujiki, H., Sueoka, E., Watanabe, T., & Suganuma, M. (2015). Primary cancer prevention by green tea, and tertiary cancer prevention by the combination of green tea catechins and anticancer compounds. Journal of cancer prevention, 20(1), 1–4. doi:10.15430/JCP.2015.20.1.1

    Han, K., Hwang, E., & Park, J. B. (2016). Association between Consumption of Coffee and the Prevalence of Periodontitis: The 2008-2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. PloS one, 11(7), e0158845. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0158845

    Khurshid, Z., Zafar, M. S., Zohaib, S., Najeeb, S., & Naseem, M. (2016). Green Tea (Camellia Sinensis): Chemistry and Oral Health. The open dentistry journal, 10, 166–173. doi:10.2174/1874210601610010166

    Pahwa, R., Jialal, I. (2019) Chronic Inflammation. StatPearls Treasure Island (FL). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173

    Paiva, C., Beserra, B., Reis, C., Dorea, J., Costa, T. D., & Amato, A. (2017). Consumption of coffee or caffeine and serum concentration of inflammatory markers: A systematic review. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 59(4), 652–663. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2017.1386159

    Peters, B. A., Mccullough, M. L., Purdue, M. P., Freedman, N. D., Um, C. Y., Gapstur, S. M., … Ahn, J. (2018). Association of Coffee and Tea Intake with the Oral Microbiome: Results from a Large Cross-Sectional Study. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 27(7), 814–821. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.epi-18-0184

    Reygaert W. C. (2018). Green Tea Catechins: Their Use in Treating and Preventing Infectious Diseases. BioMed research international, 2018, 9105261. doi:10.1155/2018/9105261

    Sajadi-Ernazarova KR, Hamilton RJ. Caffeine, Withdrawal. (2019) In: StatPearls [Internet]. Treasure Island (FL): StatPearls Publishing; 2019 Jan-. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK430790/

    Yang, C., & Wang, H. (2016). Cancer Preventive Activities of Tea Catechins. Molecules, 21(12), 1679. doi: 10.3390/molecules21121679

    Experts:

    Dr. Edo Paz, M.D., cardiologist at K Health

    Ramzi Yacoub, chief pharmacy officer at SingleCare

    THREADS
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  4. #154
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    Tea laisee for 2020

    New yum cha, butterfly themed HK$20, HK$50 notes to be released in time for lai see to insure widest circulation, HKMA says
    New notes to arrive on January 14, the same day customers can start exchanging notes for lai see
    The HK$20 notes will be themed around tea gatherings, while the HK$50 notes will feature butterflies
    Enoch Yiu
    Published: 8:00am, 2 Jan, 2020


    The new HK$20 and HK$50 notes are presented during a press conference by the Hong Kong Monetary Authority. Photo: Winson Wong

    The Hong Kong Monetary Authority will launch new HK$20 and HK$50 notes on January 14, the same day customers can start exchanging old notes for new currency in preparation for Lunar New Year, it said on Wednesday.
    The notes will be released by the city’s three note-issuing banks, HSBC, Standard Chartered Bank and Bank of China (Hong Kong).
    The HK$20 notes will be themed around yum cha, or tea gatherings, while the HK$50 notes will feature butterflies. Of the 2.36 billion banknotes in circulation in Hong Kong worth a combined HK$503.9 billion (US$64.5 billion), the HK$20 notes represent the highest share at 35.7 per cent, while the HK$50 dollar notes represent 10.4 per cent.
    “The HK$20 banknote is the most circulated banknote in Hong Kong, and is part of the lives of Hong Kong people. Similarly, yum cha is a favourite [activity], as many Hongkongers like to go and enjoy dim sum lunches and tea with their family and friends. This is why we picked yum cha as the theme for the HK$20 banknotes,” Edmond Lau, the HKMA’s senior executive director, said.
    “We chose to launch the new HK$20 and HK$50 banknotes on the same day the public can go to the banks to exchange notes for lai see money, as this is an effective way of widely circulating the new notes,” he added.
    Lai see money is handed out to children and young people who are unmarried during the Lunar New Year holiday, and cash – usually HK$20 and HK$50 notes – is preferred despite the growing popularity of digital payments. According to some estimates, at least HK$10 billion in lai see changes hands each Lunar New Year holiday.


    SCMP Graphics

    Every year, the city’s three note-issuing banks prepare on average 350 million notes – including 55 per cent newly printed notes – in all denominations for lai see, according to HKMA statistics. These banks have printed a combined 260 million of the new HK$20 notes and 85 million of the new HK$50 notes, which Lau said were sufficient to meet the public’s needs.
    The two new notes are the latest and last batch to be issued under the 2018 design series. The HKMA announced the designs of the new banknotes with the latest security features in 2018, but has launched them at different times.
    The HK$1,000 note that celebrates Hong Kong as a smart international financial centre was launched in December 2018, the HK$500 note that features the city’s natural beauty was introduced in February 2019, while the HK$100 note featuring Cantonese opera was launched in September last year.
    Lau said the more than 240 types of butterflies found in Hong Kong were the inspiration for the new HK$50 notes. While the HKMA decides on security features and sets the theme, the three note-issuing banks come up with the designs.
    Older notes will continue to be legal tender, Lau added.
    THREADS
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  5. #155
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    black vs green

    Drinking green tea, rather than black, may help you live longer, new study suggests
    By Katie Hunt, CNN
    Updated 3:29 AM ET, Thu January 9, 2020

    (CNN)Drinking tea at least three times a week could reduce the risk of dying from cardiovascular disease and is linked with a longer and healthier life, at least in China, a new study suggests.

    Chinese researchers found the health benefits associated with tea were more pronounced for drinkers of green, rather than black tea, and for those who had been drinking tea regularly over a longer period of time. The benefits were also clearer among men, the study indicated.
    Researchers looked at data from 100,902 Chinese people with no history of heart attack, stroke or cancer and divided them into two groups: habitual drinkers who drank tea three or more times a week, those who never drank tea, and those who drank it less regularly. They followed up with them after a seven-year period.
    Their analysis found that regular tea drinkers had a 20% lower risk of having heart disease and stroke, and a 22% lower risk of dying from heart disease and stroke. Specifically, they found that regular tea drinkers could expect to live 1.26 years longer at age 50 than those who did not regularly enjoy a cup of tea.
    "We found that the protective effects of habitual tea consumption were very pronounced and robust across different outcomes for men, but only modest for women," Dr. Dongfeng Gu from China's National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Peking Union Medical College and the Chinese Academy of Medical Science said via email.
    "One reason might be that the proportion of habitual tea consumers among men was approximately two and a half [times] as high as that among women," Gu said. Some 48% of the men in the study were regular tea drinkers, compared with 20% of women.
    Gu said Chinese women were more likely to drink herbal tea made from rosebuds or lotus leaves but this information wasn't included.
    In their analysis, the researchers controlled for some factors like smoking, drinking, diet and physical activity that could have explained the link between tea drinking and longevity. However, as an observational study it can't establish cause and effect, only association.
    "Other things to consider that are not mentioned in the study are: Firstly, what those who weren't drinking tea were drinking -- was tea replaced by sugary drinks or caffeinated beverages ... and was that what increased their risk...?" said Jodie Relf, a registered dietitian and spokesperson for the British Dietetic Association.

    Black vs. green

    The benefits associated with drinking black tea "were not statistically significant," Gu said, but that could be because there were far fewer black tea drinkers included in the study -- only about 8% of the habitual tea drinkers participating in the study said they preferred black tea.
    Gu also said that green tea is a richer source of flavanoids, especially tea polyphenols, and these bioactive compounds could be protective against cardiovascular disease. While from the same plant and containing the same amount of caffeine, black tea is processed in a different way from green tea after picking.
    "Black tea is fully fermented and tea polyphenols might be oxidized into pigments and inactivate during fermentation. Thus green tea tends to be more effective than black tea in anti-oxidation, improving blood lipid profile, and in turn, to be more effective in cardiovascular protection," Gu said.
    Gunter Kuhnle, a professor of nutrition and food science, University of Reading in the UK, who was not involved in the study but conducts research into the association between flavanoids and health, said it's not currently known how tea -- or the compounds found in tea -- affect health.
    "The antioxidant effect of polyphenols found in tea has long been assumed to be responsible, but this has been resoundingly disproved in the last decade. Some of the compounds found in tea might have a beneficial effect, but this is currently still under investigation," he told the Science Media Centre (SMC) in London.
    As the world's most popular drink after water, Gu said that tea-drinking habits varied from place to place and the findings might not apply to Western countries, where black tea was a more popular choice -- often taken with milk or sugar.
    "Tea consumption is part of a cultural heritage, and its health effects might be confounded by other eating and drinking patterns, for example, consumption of other flavanoid-rich food or beverages like coffee."
    The conclusions of previous research on the health benefits of tea has been inconsistent, Gu said, with the study noting that green tea had been associated with lower risk of cadiovascular disease in Japan but in the UK no link was observed with black tea taken with milk.
    "This study strengthens the body of evidence that habitual tea drinking is associated with lower rates of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, though it cannot prove that it's definitely the tea that's responsible," Dr. Jenna Macciochi, a lecturer in immunology at the University of Sussex, told the SMC.
    However, she noted that "a body of evidence in nutrition suggests that whole diet patterns are more informative of diet-disease relationships than any isolated food or nutrient."
    Dr. Duane Mellor, a registered dietitian and senior teaching fellow at Aston Medical School, Aston University, said that while green tea is safe and may have benefits, green tea supplements "should be considered carefully as there has been a number of cases of liver damage reported in individuals who have consumed these in large doses."
    I drink both, almost daily.

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  6. #156
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    Winter 2020

    Yum Cha
    Where the Real Kung Fu Lessons Take Place

    By Williy Pang



    WINTER 2020


    THREADS
    Dim Sum - dian xin
    Tea
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  7. #157
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    Maybe this is more sexist in Chinese?

    FEBRUARY 21, 20215:51 PM UPDATED 15 HOURS AGO
    Sexist tea mugs leave a sour taste in China: Shanghai Daily
    By Reuters Staff

    1 MIN READ

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - A popular chain of Chinese tea shops has apologised for a range of cups and teabags sporting sexist slogans, after they sparked widespread outrage on the internet, the Shanghai Daily reported on Monday.

    Modern China Tea Shop, based in southern China’s Hunan province, was selling tea bags captioned with “the mouth says no but the body says yes,” and “my dear, I want you.”

    One mug referred to women as a “big bargain,” saying that customers could pick up an unexpected deal by meeting beautiful women while they wait for their tea.

    Modern China apologised on Saturday, saying it took responsibility for offending women and would not mistake sexist jokes for creative ideas in the future, Shanghai Daily reported.

    The offending items are no longer on sale, the newspaper added.

    Reporting by Engen Tham; editing by Jane Wardell
    Those sayings remind me of what's printed on those little candy Valentine hearts.
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