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Thread: Successful Street Applications

  1. #31
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    I had always thought that capoeira was "hiding" reality combat grappling moves in its aerial dance moves, but I'm not a capoerista.

    In any case, the bully thing in high school applies just as much to CMA circles as well. Anybody who's perceived as "different" or "uncool" is going to face lots of social opposition from the "in crowd". Bullies don't change their stripes as they get older.

    By the way, I'm sure people remember that incident where that guy robbed the US track and field team and then got chased down by Olympic caliber athletes. I remember thinking "Those track athletes were very fortunate that the guy robbing them didn't have a GUN".

  2. #32
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    rabbi sensei

    This almost went to the Martial Arts and Religion thread, but I felt it would sit better here. The rabbi angle isn't as important as the work.
    Enter the rabbi: sensai helps kids fight illness
    by Ben Hogwood, Assistant Editor
    09/11/2008

    Gary Moskowitz is helping kids with life-threatening illnesses control their fear and have some fun with martial arts. (photo by Ben Hogwood)
    Imagine being 8 years old and riding in the back of your parents car to get another dose of chemotherapy.
    The treatment may be painful, it may cause hair loss and nausea and it may leave you fragile, susceptible to bruising and excessive bleeding.

    You have an enemy but you can’t see it, you can’t control it and you don’t know how to fight it. You are scared.
    Enter Gary Moskowitz, a rabbi and martial arts sensei who is helping children with cancer and other illnesses fight back and empower themselves.
    Moskowitz is the executive director of the non-profit Martial Arts Therapy, which is bringing the program Kids Combatting Cancer to Havurat Israel Temple in Forest Hills. The program will be held on Sundays and an additional weekday, beginning in October. Moskowitz is currently looking for volunteers to help him get the program off the ground.
    Through martial arts, Moskowitz teaches these children how to cope with their fear and empower them to fight their illness. He also lets them enjoy a physical activity in a safe environment, something they would rarely have the opportunity to do.
    The program includes all the common aspects of martial arts — the punching, kicking and even some stick fighting — but it also includes a form of meditation called guidance therapy specifically designed for these young students. The therapy, in effect, lets the students give an identity to their aggressor, which they cannot see. The student imagines the cancer cells as ninjas attacking a specific part of their body. He or she then unleashes an imaginary army of “warriors” to fight back.
    “When you visualize what the pain is, visualize beating up these ninja guys, the pain subsides,” Moskowitz said. “Even if its a placebo effect, it works.”
    Another important practice a student of Moskowitz can learn is how to control fear. Whether it’s getting into a fight with other people or getting injected as part of a chemotherapy treatment, the fear needs to be controlled or it can become overwhelming, Moskowitz said, as he recounted a story of one of his students on his way to the hospital to receive treatment. At first, it took five orderlies to hold him down. After he learned some breathing techniques, he was able to sit still and take the needle.
    “Pain is a message,” Moskowitz said. “We can learn how to scramble that message.”
    But a big portion of the program is to let these children have some fun and interact with others. Because the children are too fragile to actually practice martial arts physically on each other, Moskowitz created “virtual karate,” where two students compete against each other in contests, but are several feet apart. A judge then determines the effectiveness of their kicks, punches and blocks.
    Moskowitz doesn’t know what it’s like to suffer from such a disease, but as a former police officer he is all too familiar with getting into dangerous situations, as he has throughout his life. He was a popular target for bullies as a child, the only white student his age wearing a yarmulke to school in the Bronx. By the age of 14, he had already been the victim of four armed robberies.
    He took up martial arts to protect and empower himself and help get over his own fears. When he became an instructor, he included community service as an aspect of his training, one necessary if the student wanted to advance in rank.
    In 1978, he formed Martial Arts for a Better Community, which trained instructors in how to teach martial arts to physically and emotionally challenged students, in addition to offering classes for poor children in exchange for them volunteering their time to train others.
    The program was initially successful, but ran out of steam as it ran out of funding. However, four years ago he revived the idea, this time focusing primarily on children with cancer.
    Moskowitz is currently trying to set up a study where a group of students can be gauged for a period of time to see how they progress physically.
    Currently, Moskowitz has some volunteers helping him get the word out, including Gloria Katz. She has worked as a paid volunteer coordinator for a number of years and, with some extra time on her hands, decided she wanted to find an organization to help.
    She met Moskowitz through the Havurat Israel Temple. “We got to speaking and we kind of were in sync,” she said. “I was looking for an organization I could really devote some good volunteer time to and something with purpose and meaning.”
    Moskowitz is currently looking for volunteers to help with the program, including instructors as well as people who can work with the families or contact hospitals and schools to tell them what they do.
    Eventually, he hopes to set up these programs all around the state and the country, so more children fighting for their lives can have a more holistic approach to healing.
    “These kids are not treated like sick kids,” he said. “We treat them as heroes. They are very heroic to undergo some of the things they do.”
    To learn more about the program or to volunteer, contact Moskowitz at (718) 575-3504 or e-mail gavriael@aol.com.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #33
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    Talking my kinda lady.

    now this is newsworthy...

    A female Italian karate champion said passersby in Rome just watched as a man grabbed her around the neck and she punched him until he dropped.

    It could have been much worse, Lara Liotta, 29, four-time winner of the Italian women's karate championship, told The Daily Telegraph of London. What would have happened if this person, instead of attacking me, a karate champion who knows how to defend herself well, had attacked a young girl?
    http://www.postchronicle.com/news/st...12171453.shtml

  4. #34
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    Talking

    I generally would require a photo first. There is one available at the telegraph

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/news...ts-mugger.html

    you don't want a situation in which you have austin power saying "that's a man, baby"
    dazed and confused

  5. #35
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    thanks for the upgrade.

  6. #36
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    **** gypsies
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oso View Post
    **** gypsies
    they are something else... i lived in romania for several months... bistrita, craiova, cluj-napoca, brasov... gypsies everywhere. as long as you respect them, they are no problem.

  8. #38
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    karate tackle

    we need a kung fu tackle...
    Karate teacher nabs suspected serial burglar
    posted by: Dan Boniface written by: Kyle Clark 15 hrs ago

    LITTLETON – Martial arts instructor Kevin Kowalczik admits there is no such thing as a "karate tackle," the move he pulled Tuesday night while chasing down a man in the alley behind his studio.

    Kowalczik, part-owner of ProRank Karate in the Piece St. Village, chased and tackled a man he says had just burglarized the nearby Front Range Christian Elementary School in Littleton.

    Kowalczik held 21-year-old Kyle Torres until police arrived. Torres is being held on suspicion of burglary, assault, criminal mischief, theft and possession of burglary tools. Littleton Police suspect Torres is responsible for at least five burglaries. Deputies searched his home Wednesday afternoon.

    Several tenants along the strip plaza tell 9NEWS they have been on alert after a half-dozen burglaries over the last month. Kingdom Kids Academy replaced stolen computers only to have the replacements snatched during a second break-in.

    "By the time an alarm goes off and the police can get here, he's gone," said the academy's Penny Gautier. "That's happened six or seven times."

    Kowalczik said he was locking up the studio around 11 p.m. Tuesday when he saw someone in the alley behind the school.

    The third-degree black belt "armed" himself with a rubber gun he uses for self-defense training and confronted Torres.

    "I figured at nighttime maybe it would look real," Kowalczik said.

    The karate teacher said Torres initially froze and dropped to his knees as ordered, then noticed the "weapon" was anything but a weapon.

    "He noticed the red tip and he got up to run, which was the wrong choice," Kowalczik said.

    Crystal Simangan, Kowalczik's fiancée, followed him into the alley, calling 911 on her cell phone, and witnessed the chase that ensued.

    "It felt like a scene from an action movie," Simangan said.

    "It was kind of like a diving, Superman tackle move," Kowalczik said. "There's not really a karate tackle, but I think there might be now."

    As Kowalczik, a third-degree black belt, made his "karate tackle," Simangan stuck to snapping cell phone photos.

    "I'm a white belt," she said with a shrug. "I was basically Kevin's wingman."

    Police arrived within minutes to make the arrest.

    Ty Weaver, a 12-year-old student at the karate studio, said Torres met his match in Kowalczik.

    "He didn't stand a chance," Weaver said.

    Kowalczik, who has been studying martial arts since childhood, says he has never had to use those skills against someone in real-life before.

    "We always talk about it's for self-defense only," Kowalczik said. "We don't go around throwing punches and kicks."

    "I'm just really excited that I actually had the opportunity to use it in the real world and it actually works," he said.

    Simangan drew a slightly different lesson.

    "Don't mess with the ninjas," she said with a smile.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #39
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    Shamelessly bumping the racist thread out of first position on the page. This is a successful application of net-fu.
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  10. #40
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    This one is a marginal inclusion

    It came over the newsfeeds and I felt it should be archived here somewhere, but it didn't deserve it's own thread.

    7 Article Marketing Lessons I Learned from Being a Martial Arts Champion
    By: Eric Gruber

    How does my martial arts training directly relate to my success as an article marketing expert?

    When I was seven, I was a scared, scrawny cry baby. Kids in the neighborhood stole my hat and I ran home crying! My younger brother, who was only four at the time, knocked on the bully's' door to get my hat back.

    My parents enrolled me into Chirico's School of Karate, where I learned steps that took me from NOTHING to a SELF-ASSURED 4th DEGREE BLACK BELT.

    I also learned secrets on how to become a champion in the martial arts. I discovered that these same secrets helped me become a champion in all areas of my life.

    So do you want to know what these life-changing, business-evolving secrets are?

    7 Black Belt Secrets for Article Marketing Success

    Secret #1: Watch who you hang around with

    One of our black belts drives all the way from Pennsylvania to New Jersey to practice. That's a 3-hour round trip.

    Why?

    The furious energy at Chirico's School of Karate is undeniable as soon as you walk in the door. You're surrounded by a true grandmaster with more than 40 years of martial arts training and black belts who are determined to succeed.

    Who are YOU hanging around? Where are your articles being associated? Are you just blasting articles out there? Or are you carefully selecting websites and ezines which your targeted audiences and prospects read? Remember, who you associate with will determine the level of success you can reach.

    Secret #2: Consistency is the key for long-term success

    When I don't train consistently because of traveling or personal issues, I lose karate tournaments. If you want to achieve your business goals online, you have to consistently write and submit articles. You have to be in front of your audience on a regular basis. Otherwise you will lose sales to your competitors.

    Secret #3: Ups and downs are part of the process

    During my martial arts training, I learned that there is NO possible way that you can win every tournament. Yes, I can't even tell you how many trophies, medals and plaques I have won throughout my more than 20 years of martial arts training. But, I also lost count of how many tournaments I lost in the very first round.

    Not every article you write and submit online will be a success. You will have ups and downs with your article marketing efforts, but you have to keep writing consistently. It's the only way you will win in the long term.

    Secret #4: Hard work is part of the game

    It took me ten years of blood, sweat and tears to get promoted to the rank of black belt. I learned that there are NO obstacles that I couldn't beat if I consistently persevere.

    How many of us secretly wish our success would be handed to us on a silver platter? Get real. There is work involved. The solution is to make the hard work FUN by doing what you love to do (sharing your expertise) and delegating what you don't (the mind boggling, manual article submission.)

    Secret #5: Model others who are already successful

    My instructor is a 10th degree black belt grandmaster. Yet, he doesn't try to reinvent his own martial arts training programs from scratch. He adapts training techniques, forms and strategies that were created from the ancient masters who have proven their immense success.

    When writing your articles, model article templates that work for others and then adapt it to your own writing style.

    Secret #6: Don't put all your eggs in one basket

    When we practice self-defense, we train for a variety of attacks from the front, sides and back. We do grappling and ground techniques. And, we even practice fighting against multiple attackers. So we're ready for all situations.

    Just like we want multiple fighting strategies, you want multiple streams of income that will help you fight the recession. You can easily turn your articles into products like special reports and eBooks.

    Secret #7: Find a mentor or coach for faster results

    I would not have been a state champion for two years in a row, if my instructor didn't walk me through every step of the way. I know many entrepreneurs who have wasted thousands of dollars on marketing programs that got them nowhere. Don't make that mistake. Invest in someone to show you the way - the right way - the first time. (Not sure where to start? Join my Write Your Way to Profits Insiders Circle)

    Follow these secrets, and you will reach article marketing success. You will be found online. And, you will get more prospects, publicity and profits

    About the Author:

    Article Marketing Expert Eric Gruber uses the power of articles to create online opportunities for entrepreneurs who want more publicity, prospects and profits. Now, Eric is sharing the exact roadmap, broken into 5 easy-to-follow steps that thousands have used to launch and build their businesses online with articles. And, he's giving this knowledge for FREE, with his new e-Book at: http://www.BroadcastYourArticles.com/freebook
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #41
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    Ptsd

    PTSD is the other shoe dropping from our wars. I've always thought martial arts has tremendous therapeutic effects and am impressed to see a school offering free classes for vets.

    Finding peace in ancient art
    Kung fu helps turn around life of violence for struggling Army veteran
    By Dana M. Nichols
    Record Staff Writer
    October 01, 2008 6:00 AM

    VALLEY SPRINGS - David Foster got hooked on combat.

    "At the time, it is a sense of euphoria," said Foster, who served in the Army during Operation Desert Storm (the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War) as well as in operations against drug dealers and slave traders. "Afterward, you crash."

    Civilian life was a big crash for Foster. So he hunted for ways to regain the euphoric clarity of combat. For a long time, he lived in Stockton, picking fights with other rough characters ranging from gang bangers and drug dealers to people beating their dogs. "I probably got in two or three fights a week for 10 years," Foster said.

    The Sheng Chi Foundation is offering free martial arts classes for veterans at Sheng Chi Kung Fu, 139 Main St., Valley Springs. Information: (209) 772-1760 or www.shengchifoundation.org.

    The Veterans Affairs Department finally caught up to Foster and forced him into a treatment program for post-traumatic stress disorder. That allowed him to kick the fighting habit and resume something closer to a normal life. But it didn't give him the spiritual healing he has found since through another path, an ancient art of which the VA doctors didn't approve: kung fu.

    "The VA didn't want me in martial arts, because it is related to violence," said Foster, 38, of Campo Seco in Calaveras County.

    Shou Shu kung fu is a very traditional form of the Chinese martial art. Foster began studying it at Sheng Chi Kung Fu in Valley Springs.

    Although kung fu trains a person in fighting methods, Foster said he found it an effective and safe way to capture the vivid, in-the-moment consciousness of combat without hurting anyone.

    "That is one thing the martial arts will help a military veteran do is revisit the here and now," Foster said.

    Now other veterans will have the same opportunity, as the Sheng Chi Foundation affiliated with the Valley Springs martial arts studio began in August to offer free classes to veterans. Sheng Chi co-owner Phil Weaver said he has had a number of students over the years who reported that studying the art helped their recovery from post-traumatic stress disorder.

    "You have to concentrate so much on what you are doing in here that you can't have any other thoughts in your head," Weaver said.

    Weaver said he and his wife, Liz Weaver, who co-owns the business and also teaches kung fu, wanted to do something to help veterans, including those returning to civilian life from the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Experts on post-traumatic stress disorder said studying an art such as kung fu may be helpful to PTSD patients, but they also offered some cautions.

    "I think that can be helpful, but you always have to be careful of whether a student is tolerant of an exposure to things that are going to mimic combat," said David Lechuga, a Southern California neuropsychologist who runs his own clinic in Lake Forest and teaches at University of California, Los Angeles, and Pepperdine University.

    Lechuga knows the issue well; he is a fifth-degree black belt in Shotokan karate, and his students include veterans who witnessed heavy combat.

    "There is an underlying theme of violence in everything we do," Lechuga said. "It is controlled, but it is violence nonetheless."

    Phil Weaver said maintaining a safe, trusting environment is key to effective learning, and at times he has paused classes when students with PTSD began suffering a negative reaction.

    "It is very emotionally challenging to learn the art. It does push people out of the box," he said.

    Scott Jensen, assistant professor of psychology at University of the Pacific in Stockton, said it makes sense that studying a highly disciplined martial art would offer benefits to people with stress disorders but said he is not aware of any particular research indicating martial arts are better or worse than other highly disciplined activities.

    Research shows that a method called exposure therapy is an effective way to treat PTSD, Jensen said. Exposure therapy patients are encouraged to re-experience traumatic events, which can be anything from war violence to a car accident to a molestation, in a safe environment, thus gradually reducing the impact of the trauma.

    Experts agreed that individuals suffering PTSD should seek treatment first from clinicians skilled in helping people with the disorder. But those interviewed for this story also said martial arts training is a positive opportunity for veterans.

    "It sounds like a great program and a great service," Jensen said.

    Gary Howells is a professor of psychology at Pacific and a Navy veteran who served two tours in Vietnam.

    He said arrangements such as the free kung fu classes offer the hope of communitywide healing as veterans are welcomed back to civilian life.

    "If nothing else, it is another means of removing the isolation and saying that we appreciate you. And I think that is an important, positive message," Howells said. "We are doing it better with (the Persian Gulf War and the Iraq war) than we did with Vietnam veterans."

    Foster, meanwhile, is still studying kung fu, although he is doing it privately with an instructor who lives in Mokelumne Hill.

    He still suffers many of the classic PTSD symptoms, including nightmares and hypertension, and he pretty much avoids crowds by staying at home and gardening. But he says his human relationships have improved.

    "Things are better. I fell better about myself."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by bodhitree View Post
    Wow, that lady is 53, I wish they said what martial art she did, her weight, and other stuff.


    And she's a marathon runner.
    Yeah...nobody likes a show-off at any age...very impressive.

  13. #43
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    Decision 2008

    Would you vote for this guy?
    2-term incumbent faces martial arts instructor in House District 68
    By CYNTHIA REYNAUD • creynaud@dmreg.com • October 18, 2008

    An incumbent with a focus on keeping young people in Iowa faces a martial arts instructor and business owner in the race for Iowa House District 68.

    Republican challenger Larry Voorhees, the owner of and master instructor at Voorhees Taekwondo Inc., said he decided to run against incumbent Democrat Rick Olson to get off the sidelines and fix the issues with which he disagrees.

    "For too many years, I've been fussing about what happens at the Statehouse," Voorhees said. "I can't tell my black belts to get involved in life if I don't do it myself."

    Voorhees is a newcomer to government and politics, but says he has held leadership positions as the president of the State of Iowa Black Belt Association and as a project manager at Nationwide Insurance in Des Moines. Those jobs have provided him with skills he would use as a state representative, he said.

    "People have this perception that government is so complex, and it's not, or it doesn't need to be," he said. "I have the contacts, I have the ability, to gather a group of people and get something done."

    Olson has served two terms in the Iowa House. He said his background in law has set him apart from others in recent years.

    Olson works as a private practice attorney.

    "I've got the ability to communicate ... and an understanding of Iowa code and statutes," he said.

    Olson's focus in the past four years has been on keeping young adults in Iowa. Another term in office would allow him to continue that work, he said.

    He cited his own daughters as an example of talented youth who left the state for positions in other areas of the country.

    "There's no reason for them to come back here," he said. "I wish they were back here in Iowa, but there's nothing here to keep them here."

    Olson said he hopes to create benefits that offer discounted college tuition to students from Iowa who commit to live and work in the state for a certain number of years after graduation.

    "That's how you keep these kids here," Olson said.

    Voorhees said he will focus on whatever the community deems important.

    "This is not pushing Larry's agenda. It's about what the people want me to represent them for," Voorhees said.

    He listed "protecting traditional family values by seeing a marriage amendment voted on by the people of the state" and "providing fiscal restraint and responsibility in the state budget" as examples of what he thinks should be priorities.

    "The bottom line is I want them to vote," Voorhees said. "It's not only our right, it's our duty and obligation to vote. If you didn't vote, you lost the chance to make the difference."
    Candidate Q&A

    Democrat Rick Olson and Republican Larry Voorhees answered the following questions about state issues:

    Q. What is your top priority for enhancing economic growth in Iowa?

    Olson: Providing a work force that meets the needs of business — existing or potential.

    Voorhees: Encourage small businesses to grow, develop, invest and be innovative. Provide incentives to the smaller businesses so that the playing field becomes at least a bit more level.

    Q. What is the most important thing the state should do to make Iowa schools more competitive in the global economy?

    Olson: Emphasize math and science. Every child that graduates should be fluent in a language other than English.

    Voorhees: I think a better question would be, “what is the most important thing the state should do to make Iowa GRADUATES more competitive in the global economy?” It is the students who we need to educate better so they can be more successful and competitive. We should emphasize basic skills: reading, writing, computational skills, basic economics, consumer skills, comprehensive reasoning, appreciation for the arts … and we do what we can to ensure that students don’t just pass these classes, but that they have the skills to be successful in these areas. Initially, it is the responsibility of local school boards to insist on these things, but it is up to the state to help make this the environment and the baseline.

    Q. How would you hold state government accountable to taxpayers?

    Olson: Encourage citizens to vote.

    Voorhees: A good first step would be to require that any increase in taxation that equals 10 percent or more of the current budget must be voted on and approved by the general public before it can be instituted. Secondly, I would strongly suggest that tax monies raised for a specific purpose only be used for that specific purpose.

    Q. What are Iowa’s most urgent infrastructure needs and how would you pay for them?

    Olson: Most urgent would be highways. We need to re-evaluate the amount of taxpayer money being spent on farm-to-market roads, and reallocate the same to primary and secondary highways. We are increasing licensing fees. The bipartisan infrastructure and transportation task force has spent considerable time evaluating this subject. I would defer to their recommendations.

    Voorhees: Roads, bridges, existing levees, in that order. Roads and bridges should be paid for out of the current funding models, for the time being, until we have a chance to see if we can do a better job. Levee repair/reconstruction will need to find at least a temporary funding source, within the current general fund, without imposing new taxation on people, if there isn’t a current mechanism in place. I also think we should research whether the development of light rail transit would be beneficial; however, that may be something that needs to be addressed by local metro areas, rather than by the state Legislature.

    Q. What should Iowa do, in light of this year’s flood disaster, to protect property and taxpayer dollars in the future? If there are costs involved, say how you would pay for it.

    Olson: Obviously, the federal government needs to step up to the plate and provide disaster relief. There are few ways to protect the community from flooding that doesn’t, then, cause flooding downstream. Nature has a mind of its own, and our ability to predict rain totals is not an exact science. The Army Corps of Engineers bears a certain responsibility in that they regulate the amount of water released in our major reservoirs in Iowa. The development of additional reservoirs may be of some benefit in the future. Re-evaluate flood plain development.

    Voorhees: What funding sources are currently targeted for those types of projects? Has there been a well-thought-out program or project plan for the future? Without having access to that information, it would be inappropriate of me to speculate an answer. It remains to be seen what the current federal and state responses will be in the immediate future. Then, a long-term, broad-based solution will need to be studied and brought forward.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #44
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    well the guy has a memorable last name....lets just be happy his first name isnt Jason.

    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

  15. #45
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    Well... he'd probably promise to slash spending. And institute a one-strike policy where he'd severely punish people for vice crimes by impailing them...
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

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