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Thread: Chi Sao; donít over work the mind (strong stance)Ö

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ali. R View Post
    I think just about everyone here would agree; when they first heard of wing chun they heard of things like; ďitís a fighting art in which uses sensitively and it teaches you to stay softĒ, and so and so forthÖ

    When you do wing chun or while playing chi sao, do you promote and perpetuate softness and sensitively, just like everyone talks about? Do you have rigidness, tension in the hands and lost of balance when playing chi sao? If so, then youíre going against everything that really brought you to the art (softness and sensitively)Ö
    Ali Rahim.
    What brought me to the art was the idea that a self-defense situation could be diffused very quickly easily. The same engine for everything (elbow) enables me to shut my thinking brain off and just drive forward.

    My opinion of all this "sensitivity training" is that most of it is going to go out the window when the sh!t hits the fan. When I get an adrenaline dump and tunnel vision, it's going to be little more mash-mash than sensitivity.

    So while the sensitivity training can provide a little more of an advantage, I think it's more important that I concentrate on hitting and making my fist act like the ball on the end of a chain. When it comes to Chi Sau, I'm really leaning more into the idea that the drill has been made into a soft-patty-cake mess. I'm looking for ways to eliminate the extraneous movements and wet- spaghetti-like movements.

    My opinion on the whole matter,
    Kenton
    ďAn ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.Ē Ė Friedrich Engels

  2. #32
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    Why spaz out?

    I like your post, because I truly can relate to it, I had the same problem until I really started to focus on structure…

    That’s because one gives up on structure first when under pressure… Sensitivity is only lost when ones structure is not consistent, trading in the ideal of structure with ones own ideals dealing with might and physical force, because all was lost in the beginning stages of pressure (Grace and understanding), usually the stance will go first…

    That’s why one should work on their stance first, then work on their chi sao structure (defensively)… The more one thinks of hitting, the more one forgets about defense, then the more punches will be traded with one another, and you will get hit a lot…

    Maybe it’s just me; I’ll rather simultaneously strike and block or just pull someone's strike right out of the air, knowing in my mind that I will develop the understanding of truly stopping someone’s strike ,and not just trading punches…

    Take care,


    Ali Rahim.
    Last edited by Ali. R; 07-04-2008 at 02:04 PM.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ali. R View Post
    I like your post, because I truly can relate to it, I had the same problem until I really started to focus on structureÖ

    Thatís because one gives up on structure first when under pressureÖ Sensitivity is only lost when ones structure is not consistence, trading in the ideal of structure with ones own ideals dealing of might and physical force, because all was lost in the beginning stages of pressure (Grace and understanding) usually the stance will go firstÖ

    Thatís why one should work on their stance first, then work on their chi sao structure (defensively)Ö The more one thinks of hitting, the more one forgets about defense, then the more punches will be traded with one another, and you will get hit a lotÖ

    Maybe itís just me; Iíll rather simultaneously strike and block or just pull someone's strike right out of the air, knowing in my mind that I will develop the understanding of truly stopping someoneís strike ,and not just trading punchesÖ

    Take care,


    Ali Rahim.
    I agree that trading punches is not a good idea.

    I also agree with the idea of working the stance more than anything. Well, almost more than anything (facing and elbow).

    I see a lot of people almost standing up in their YJKYM. Lazy monkeys aren't getting low enough!

    No horse = No kung-fu!
    ďAn ounce of action is worth a ton of theory.Ē Ė Friedrich Engels

  4. #34
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    6 to 8 years is not enough to officially teach Chi SaoÖ

    I heard thatÖ And mostly those that have trained with good sifus and masters still donít have it (because their stance want allow it), it usually takes up to ten years to develop such energies correctly (far as chi sao)Ö

    And letís face it; you need more then just 7 or 6 years of this type of training (wing chun) because half of those years are just fundamental understandings, but you have some that are teaching these method that are with well known sufus, and their teachers allowing this and letting this to continue to happen (need the money huh)Ö

    If one has not truly mastered at least the first three forms, and have at least 9 to 10 years of training, it would be hard to take their word on what chi sao should really be like, unless they spent a lot of time with an experience teacher daily, and not just becoming a seminar babyÖ

    A see yah, when I see yah, or see yah when I can type of studentÖ When one teaches chi sao to early in there wing chun careers you will know it, because they well get hit a lot by their own students while in training, literally turning themselves and their students into punching bagsÖ

    My students only hit me when I let them, and many of them are members here on this forum and would vouch for itÖ When I say the door is now shut, they cannot hit me at all and I never have to use any offense, Iíll just ĎDí up until they slow down, then Iíll snatch them right out the frameÖ

    Iím not saying this because I think that Iím the man or something like thatÖ I just know what I know, and learned it from someone that does alsoÖ

    Take care,


    Ali Rahim.
    Last edited by Ali. R; 07-06-2008 at 03:30 PM.

  5. #35
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    I would rather learn to stop strikes other than becoming a punching bag…


    Ali Rahim.
    Last edited by Ali. R; 07-06-2008 at 10:18 AM.

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