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  1. #61
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    just *****?

    ...somehow a ***** snake attack seems worse.


    Sea Snakes Attacking Humans Probably Just *****, Scientists Say

    Sea snake attacks are mysterious and sometimes deadly, and now scientists say they may just be 'highly aroused.'

    By Becky Ferreira
    August 19, 2021, 8:00am


    OLIVE SEA SNAKES ARE AMONG THE LARGEST MARINE SNAKE SPECIES, AND ARE ABUNDANT ON SOME CORAL-REEF AREAS. CREDIT: JACK BREEDON

    Picture yourself snorkeling or scuba-diving along a lush coral reef, abundant with color and life. All of a sudden, this serene underwater experience morphs into a horror show as an aggressive sea snake slithers into view and attacks you for no apparent reason.

    Should you ever face this scary situation, ocean scientists have some sage words of advice: don’t panic and stay still, because the snake may just be trying to mate with you.

    That’s the upshot of a new study led by Tim Lynch, a senior research scientist at Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, which is based on his 158 encounters with olive sea snakes (Aipysurus laevis) as a diver in the Great Barrier Reef.

    Lynch and his colleagues observed that unprovoked aggression from these animals almost always involves males during the breeding season, suggesting that these encounters are a result of “mistaken identity during sexual interactions,” according to a study that offers “the first quantitative evidence on sea snake ‘attacks,’” published on Thursday in Scientific Reports.

    These insights about olive sea snakes were recorded in dives Lynch conducted from 1994 and 1995, but it wasn’t until the coronavirus pandemic hit in 2020 that the opportunity finally arose to publish the results.

    “You can blame COVID for this,” said Richard Shine, a professor of biology at Macquarie University and an emeritus professor at the University of Sydney who co-authored the study, in an email.

    “Tim Lynch did the work as part of his PhD,” he continued. “I examined his thesis in 2000, thought it was great, but he never published it. Stuck at home with COVID, I contacted Tim to ask if he was interested in collaborating with me to turn bits of his thesis into published papers. He agreed (bless his heart!), and this is the first one.”

    Though Lynch captured this data decades ago, the lessons from the study remain just as relevant today. Sea snake attacks are rare, but they can be fatal, according to another recent study that Shine co-authored.

    Some snake species are extremely venomous, including olive sea snakes. Victims tend to be fishers because “snakes caught by fishermen are stressed and can’t escape, so they retaliate,” Shine noted. However, recreational swimmers and divers could be threatened by encounters as well: even if a snake doesn’t bite a diver, the panic from an unprovoked attack could put the person’s life at risk.

    It’s easy to see why a sea snake that has been captured by fishers would retaliate and defend itself, but Lynch, Shine, and co-author Ross Alford, an ecologist at James Cook University, wanted to understand the motivations behind unprovoked attacks. The authors note that it is extremely rare for snakes that live on land to charge or bite people for no reason, making this behavior in their marine relatives something of an anomaly in the larger snake family.

    By examining diver reports and Lynch’s own observations, the researchers discovered that aggression toward humans almost always occurred during the winter breeding season, which lasts from May to August. Males approached humans much more often than females, and displayed behaviors that could be related to courtship, such as coiling around a diver’s limb.

    “Agitated rapid approaches by males, easily interpreted as ‘attacks,’ often occurred after a courting male lost contact with a female he was pursuing, after interactions between rival males, or when a diver tried to flee from a male,” the authors wrote in the study.

    These encounters suggest that a “reproductively active male, highly aroused, mistakes the diver for another snake (a female or a rival male),” they added. “At first sight, the idea that a snake might mistake a human diver for another snake seems ludicrous, given the massive disparity in size and shape between those two objects. Nonetheless, this offers the most plausible explanation for our observations.”

    Indeed, the study suggests that sea snakes may have poor eyesight compared to land snakes, which could also explain the rare instances of females charging divers. These females were often fleeing from pursuant males, and may have mistaken humans for coral formations that they could hide behind.

    As tempting as it might be to try to escape these encounters, the team notes that a sea snake might give chase—and you are simply not likely to outswim these speedy ocean animals. The best course of action is for the person to stay still and let the snake explore them by “tongue-flicking,” or even making contact with the skin or wetsuit, which is likely to de-escalate the conflict as the animal realizes its mix-up.

    “If mistaken identity underlies most ‘attacks’ by sea snakes on divers, the best strategy for divers in such a situation may be to allow the snake to investigate them and in particular to allow for the snake to investigate chemical cues with its tongue; a bite is unlikely unless the animal is threatened or injured,” the team said in the study. “Attempting to flee is likely to be futile and may even increase the ardour of the pursuit; and attempting to drive the animal away may induce retaliation.”

    Shine and his colleagues also point out that male sea snakes are far from the only species that “court inappropriate objects,” in the words of the study, and provide many colorful examples of other mistaken courtship attempts. Dolphins, dugongs, sea lions, and sea turtles have all been observed attempting to copulate with humans, and “some beetles famously court beer bottles,” the study notes.

    Shine hopes that these recent studies into sea snakes will motivate people to better understand these mysterious and important marine animals.

    “Sea snakes are very understudied, so the potential is huge,” he said.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #62
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    Wait ... what?

    Our forum censors h0rny? Oh man, that's hilarious.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #63
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    Snake pizza

    Pizza Hut in Hong Kong rolls out snake-meat pizza for limited time
    Doc Louallen
    USA TODAY

    Pizza Hut introduced a new and exotic pizza option available only in Hong Kong that's garnering attention around the world. The new pizza is topped with finely shredded snake meat, giving it a distinctive texture and flavor.

    Pizza Hut and Ser Wong Fun teamed up to create a 9-inch pizza inspired by traditional snake stew. The pizza features shredded snake meat, black mushrooms, and Chinese dried ham.

    The pizza will only be available until November 22nd.

    According to CNN, customers who have tried the pizza claim that the texture of the snake is similar to dry chicken.

    No strings attached:Krispy Kreme wants to gift you a dozen donuts on World Kindness Day.


    Pizza Hut pizza with snake meat.
    Inspired by popular regional dish

    Snake meat is believed to have medicinal properties and Pizza Hut claims that it can boost blood circulation.

    “Combined with pizza, it marks a breakthrough from the conventional concept of what maintaining good health means while challenging one’s taste buds,” Pizza Hut Hong Kong said in a statement to CNN.

    A popular Hong Kong and southern China snake stew inspired the dish.

    Pizza Hut Hong Kong has announced its plans to introduce unconventional menu items, such as a pizza topped with Chinese preserved sausages. This move is part of a trend among Asian franchises of American brands to celebrate local food culture with gastronomical creations, including pizzas featuring durian, pig blood curds, or Tonkotsu ramen.

    Fast-Food-Nastiness
    snakes
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  4. #64
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    northern green anaconda

    Gigantic new snake discovered in Amazon rainforest could be biggest in world at ‘astounding’ half a ton
    AMY WOODYATT, CNN Feb 24, 2024 0
    This is a modal window.The media could not be loaded, either because the server or network failed or because the format is not supported.
    Scientists have made a remarkable discovery in the Amazon rainforest, uncovering a previously unknown species of giant anaconda. This discovery was made while filming National Geographic’s Disney+ series "Pole to Pole" with Will Smith. This newly documented species, named the northern green …


    Scientists working in the Amazon rainforest have discovered a new species of snake, rumored to be the biggest in the world.

    A team from the University of Queensland traveled to the Ecuadorian Amazon to search for the previously undocumented northern green anaconda (Eunectes akayima), following an invitation from the Waorani people to observe anacondas “rumoured to be the largest in existence,” according to the scientists.

    The team joined the hunters on a 10-day expedition to the Bameno region of Baihuaeri Waorani Territory, before paddling down the river system to “find several anacondas lurking in the shallows, lying in wait for prey,” Professor Bryan Fry, a biologist from the University of Queensland, who led the team, said in a statement.


    A Northern green anaconda on a riverbank.
    Bryan Fry, The University of Queensland

    Anacondas are giant, non-venomous constricting snakes found in or near water in warm parts of South America.

    “The size of these magnificent creatures was incredible — one female anaconda we encountered measured an astounding 6.3 meters (20.7 feet) long,” Fry said of the team’s discovery, which was made while filming for National Geographic’s upcoming series “Pole to Pole with Will Smith.”

    The team also said they had heard anecdotal evidence that snakes of 24.6 feet and 1,100 pounds had been sighted in the area.

    Green anacondas are the world’s heaviest snakes, according to the UK’s Natural History Museum, which noted that the heaviest individual ever recorded weighed 500 pounds. It measured 27.7 feet long and was 3.6 feet wide.


    Close-up of a northern green anaconda head.
    Bryan Fry, University of Queensland
    While another species, the reticulated python, tends to be longer — often reaching more than 20.5 feet in length – it is lighter.

    But experts studying the creatures discovered that the newly identified northern green anaconda species diverged from the southern green anaconda almost 10 million years ago, and they differ genetically by 5.5%.

    “It’s quite significant — to put it in perspective, humans differ from chimpanzees by only about 2%,” Fry said. The findings are described in the journal MDPI Diversity.

    The team then set out to compare the genetics of the green anaconda with other specimens elsewhere to assess them as an indicator species for the health of ecosystems, and warned that the Amazon is facing numerous threats.

    “Deforestation of the Amazon basin from agricultural expansion has resulted in an estimated 20-31% habitat loss, which may impact up to 40% of its forests by 2050,” Fry said.

    Habitat degradation, forest fires, drought and climate change threaten rare species like the anacondas, which exist in such rare ecosystems, he added.
    That's terrifyingly big.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #65
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    China Snake Farm - How Farmer Make 1 Billion USD from 3 Million Snake Every Year?

    Gene Ching
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  6. #66
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    venomous snake migration

    Venomous snakes likely to migrate en masse amid global heating, says study
    Researchers find many countries unprepared for influx of new species and will be vulnerable to bites
    Neelima Vallangi
    Fri 3 May 2024 05.35 EDT

    Climate breakdown is likely to lead to the large-scale migration of venomous snake species into new regions and unprepared countries, according to a study.

    The researchers forecast that Nepal, Niger, Namibia, China, and Myanmar will gain the most venomous snake species from neighbouring countries under a heating climate.

    Low-income countries in south and south-east Asia, as well as parts of Africa, will be highly vulnerable to increased numbers of snake bites, according to the findings published in the journal Lancet Planetary Health.

    The study modelled the geographical distribution of 209 venomous snake species that are known to cause medical emergencies in humans to understand where different snake species might find favourable climatic conditions by 2070.

    While a majority of the venomous snake species will experience range contractions due to loss of tropical and subtropical ecosystems, habitats for some species such as the west African gaboon viper will increase by up to 250%, the study found.

    The ranges of the European asp and the horned viper were also forecast to more than double by 2070.

    However, some snakes, including the variable bush viper endemic to Africa and the hognosed pit viper of the Americas were projected to lose more than 70% of their range.

    “As more land is converted for agriculture and livestock rearing, it destroys and fragments the natural habitats that snakes rely on,” said study authors Pablo Ariel Martinez at the Federal University of Sergipe in Brazil and Talita F Amado at the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research in Leipzig, Germany.

    “However, some generalist snake species, especially those of medical concern, can adapt to agricultural landscapes and even thrive in certain crop fields or livestock areas that provide food sources like rodents.”

    “Our research shows that when venomous snakes start showing up in new places, it’s a wake-up call for us to start thinking about how we can keep ourselves and our environment safe,” the study authors said.

    The World Health Organization estimates 1.8 to 2.7 million people are bitten by venomous snakes each year, causing up to 138,000 deaths and at least 400,000 amputations and permanent disabilities. The WHO categorised snakebite envenomation as a neglected tropical disease of the highest priority in 2017.

    “We are now finally getting a better handle on how snakes will change their distributions with climate change but there is also a major concern that they will bite more people if warm temperatures, severe wet weather events, and flooding that displaces snakes and people get more frequent,” said Anna Pintor, a research scientist with the WHO’s neglected tropical diseases group. “We urgently need to understand better how exactly this will affect where people get bitten, and how many people get bitten, so that we can prepare.”

    “Snakebite is in essence a human-animal-environment conflict. The modelling does not take into account how humans themselves will adapt/change to climate change. [But] the global study addresses a significant gap in knowledge,” said Soumyadeep Bhaumik, a medicine lecturer at the University of New South Wales in Sydney who was not involved in the study. “The need for countries with high [snakebite] burden to collaborate with neighbouring countries is something that the new study underlines.”

    “After all, international borders are not for snakes, they are for humans,” he added.
    yikes
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  7. #67
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    Oh man...



    Published 14:54 23 May 2024 GMT+1
    Man who tried to get eaten alive by snake immediately regretted it
    Paul Rosolie offered himself up on a plate for the largest, heaviest snake in the world
    Olivia Burke

    We've all watched some kind of wildlife documentary before and been absolutely fascinated by the way snakes secure their lunch - but I'll bet seeing a bloke offer himself up on a plate to one will blow all of that out of the water.
    Most people would run a mile if they saw a slippery serpent making a beeline towards them, as all those hours watching David Attenborough have left us pretty clued up on their killer capabilities.
    Honestly, you'd probably be better off doing ten rounds with Tyson rather than taking your chances with one of the most powerful snakes on the planet, like the green anaconda.
    But for Paul Rosolie, these semi-aquatic species are sort of his pals - and the same goes for every other animal in the Amazon rainforest, as the conservationist has made it his life's mission to try and save it.

    Paul Rosolie in the Amazon. (Instagram/@paulrosolie)
    He's dedicated everything to protecting creatures, their habitats, and essential ecosystems over the last 16 years, spending time in countries such as Indonesia, Brazil, India and Peru.
    The researcher has spent years studying the green anacondas which call the Amazon home, while dually watching their 'habitats decrease and decrease' helplessly - so he knew he needed to pull out the big guns to help try and save it.
    Rosolie reckoned that people needed to see something which would give them a 'shock' to actually stir up support for their mission to save the rainforest - so naturally, he volunteered to get eaten alive by a green anaconda.

    Back in 2014, the nature lover embarked on a daring mission that saw him offer himself up for dinner to the largest and heaviest snake in the world, which also doubled as a 'massive fundraiser to protect the rainforest'.
    The Junglekeepers founder, whose organisation claims to have protected more than 77,000+ acres of Amazonian habitat and wildlife, quickly came to regret this decision though when it came down to it.
    Rosolie's incredible quest was featured in an episode of the Discovery Channel series Eaten Alive and showed how the 38-year-old spent weeks trying to track down a green anaconda with a 10-strong team.
    Luckily, they found the perfect candidate - a 20ft long, 18 stone snake - in the Peruvian Amazon.
    Rosolie was donning a carbon-fibre suit for the bizarre experiment, which had been custom-made by a team of engineers using 3D technology to ensure he wouldn't get crushed by the snake.

    He wore a custom-made carbon fibre suit to protect himself (Discovery Channel)
    It was streamlined so that it would not irritate the animal's insides and was strong enough to survive its digestive fluids too.
    The animal lover was slathered in pig's blood to make sure his journey into the snake's gob went as smoothly as possible.
    Rosolie's specialist suit was also rigged out with a radio mic and built-in cameras, so his team could communicate with him about what was going on at all times.
    He also sported a face mask which was connected to a crush-proof hose that trailed behind him which was attached to a three-hour oxygen supply - just in case he did get completely eaten and ended up suffocating in the snake's stomach.
    Rosolie approached the anaconda 'on all fours' in a bid to fool the snake into thinking he was a wild boar and it only took a matter of seconds before the female anaconda had her 5ft 9ins victim exactly where she wanted him.
    It latched onto Rosolie's head and began constricting his arms and body by wrapping itself around him.

    Rosolie approached the green anaconda on all fours (Discovery Channel)
    "I'm getting coils over me," he told his team at the time. "She's got my arms pinned. She knows there's nothing I can do."
    Rosolie was then heard saying 'Oh god,' but reassured his colleagues that he was okay, even though his heart rate had shot up 'pretty high' and his breathing had become 'really laboured', according to one of the team.
    He said he was 'trying to stay calm' as the green anaconda began to tighten her grip around his body as he wriggled on the rainforest floor, later admitting that he is 'the type who’ll say, 'I’m fine, I’m fine'...until I’m dead'.
    The daredevil didn't respond when another colleague checked in with him, before the snake then latched onto his head.
    Rosolie then screamed to his pals: "Stand by guys, I'm starting to feel like she's consuming me. Guys, my face is down.
    "I'm calling it, I need help!"
    The team immediately rushed over and wrestled the snake off of him, despite only part of his head being consumed.

    The 20ft long snake latched onto the daredevil's head while wrapping itself around him (Discovery Channel)
    Speaking of his attempt at getting eaten alive afterwards, Rosolie said: "The last thing I remember was her mouth open wide and everything went black. I went limp and let it constrict. All the while I was just thinking: 'Eat, eat, eat!'
    "She wrapped around me and I felt my suit cracking and my arms ripping out of their sockets," he recalled.
    As you can tell, the animal lover realised very quickly that he could be inches away from death.
    He explained that he feared the snake was going to 'snap' his arm, as 'her force was fully on his exposed arm', which is why he decided to 'tap out' of the experiment.
    But Rosolie insisted he 'wasn't terrified' during an interview with MSNBC, as he was confident that his carbon-fibre suit was 'strong' and that he 'wouldn't get crushed', adding that there were 'experts on hand' in case of any issues.
    "We took a lot of care," the author added. "It was really all about showing people the power of these snakes with the mission of protecting their habitats."
    The fact he was between the jaws of a green anaconda that was squeezing the life out of him and that he lived to tell the tale while dodging asphyxiation is certainly a mean feat - but let's leave the 'eaten alive' stuff to the movies, eh?
    Featured Image Credit: Discovery Channel
    What some people will do for the spotlight...
    Gene Ching
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  8. #68
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    python surprise

    Large Snake Found Coiled Up In Upper West Side Backyard: NYPD
    The five-foot-long serpent found its way into an Upper West Side home and has now been relocated to the ASPCA, police said.

    Vianella Burns,
    Patch Staff

    Posted Wed, Jun 5, 2024 at 12:20 pm ET
    Updated Thu, Jun 6, 2024 at 10:01 am ET


    The five-foot-long serpent found its way into an Upper West Side home and has now been relocated to the ASPCA, police said. (Google Maps/Shutterstock)
    UPPER WEST SIDE, NY — A massive snake slithered into an Upper West Side apartment on Wednesday morning, according to police.

    Authorities reported that the serpent slid into the building at West 87th St., between Columbus and Amsterdam Avenues, and was discovered in the early hours of Wednesday morning.

    Police were called to the building when a resident saw the snake slither on an exterior gate attempting to enter the basement apartment, cops said.

    Upon arrival at the scene, police discovered the five-foot-long python perched in the backyard of the apartment, an NYPD spokesperson said.


    The five-foot-long serpent found its way into an Upper West Side home and has now been relocated to the ASPCA, police said. (NYPD)

    Emergency Service Unit members assisted in removing the snake from the apartment, and it was then taken to a nearby ASPCA chapter for further care, police said.

    It was not made immediately clear where the python came from, but the investigation remains ongoing, police said.

    This article has since been updated with additional information from the NYPD.
    5ft ain't that large for a python.
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  9. #69
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    45-Foot Serpent

    An Ancient, 45-Foot Serpent Is Unearthed In India—Possibly The Biggest Snake Ever Discovered
    Scott Travers
    Contributor
    I write about the world of biology.
    Jun 16, 2024,09:39am EDT

    It’s not uncommon for ancestral species to be much larger than their modern day relatives. The giant ... [+]GETTY
    Scientists at the Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee discovered fossilized remnants of what they believe to be a giant madtsoiid snake of the early-middle Eocene epoch, approximately 50 million years ago. They made their discovery while fossil hunting at the Panandhro Lignite Mine in Kutch, Western India–finding an excellently preserved, partial vertebral column of the giant Eocene snake.

    “We report the discovery of a giant madtsoiid snake, one of largest snakes ever reported, from an interval corresponding to a warm Middle Eocene period (~47 million years ago) of India,” write the authors in a recent paper published in Scientific Reports. “The estimated body length of 11–15 meters makes this new taxon (Vasuki indicus) the largest known madtsoiid snake, which thrived during a warm geological interval with average temperatures estimated at 28 °C.”


    A view of the dig site in the western Indian state of Gujrat, where the fossils of Vasuki indicus ... [+]DATTA & BAJPAI (2024)
    The authors can only speculate about the giant snake’s characteristics and disposition, but they believe Vasuki indicus to be the largest known snake in the extinct madtsoiid family. Given the shape of its vertebral column, they don’t believe the snake was water-dwelling. And, given its sheer size, it’s unlikely that it was arboreal either.

    “Similarity in vertebral morphology with extant large-bodied pythonids (e.g., Python and Malayopython) suggests a terrestrial/semi-aquatic paleohabitat for Vasuki,” hypothesize the authors. “Corroborative evidence comes from the depositional environment of the Vasuki-yielding horizon, which was reconstructed as a back swamp marsh, similar to the habitat of modern large pythonids.”

    The authors posit that Vasuki indicus was a slow-moving, ambush predator that would subdue its prey through constriction, similar to present-day anacondas and large pythons.

    Whether this is the biggest fossilized snake ever discovered is a matter of debate. The only clear rival to Vasuki indicus are the remains of a 60 million year old Titanaboa (Titanoboa cerrejonensis), discovered in northeastern Columbia and documented in a 2009 paper published in Nature.

    “It is worth noting that the largest body-length estimates of Vasuki appear to exceed that of Titanoboa, even though the vertebral dimensions of the Indian taxon are slightly smaller than those of Titanoboa,” state the authors. “We acknowledge that this observation may be a reflection of the different datasets used to formulate the predictive equations.”

    Here’s a bit more about what is known about these two ancient and massive snake groups.

    Titanoboa


    A drawing of what a massive Titanoboa might have looked like. BY NOBU TAMURA EMAIL:NOBU.TAMURA@YAHOO.COM WWW.PALAEOCRITTI.COM - OWN WORK UPLOADED BY ARTIST HERE:[1] LARGER VERSION FROM:[2], CC BY 3.0, HTTPS://COMMONS.WIKIMEDIA.ORG/W/INDEX.PHP?CURID=8879916
    Titanoboa, a genus within the family Boidae, stands out as one of the most remarkable and largest snakes ever discovered. Fossils of Titanoboa cerrejonensis, estimated to have lived around 58-60 million years ago in Colombia, indicate a colossal serpent that likely exceeded 40 feet in length and weighed over a ton. This ancient giant inhabited the warm, tropical environment of what is now northern Colombia, thriving in lush rainforests of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana. As a top predator of its time, Titanoboa would have preyed upon a variety of large vertebrates, employing its powerful constricting abilities akin to modern boa constrictors.

    Madtsoiid snakes


    Massive fossilize vertebral bones of Madtsoia bai are shown here.BY GHEDOGHEDO - TOOK THE FOTO ON THE "AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY" IN NEW YORK, PUBLIC DOMAIN, HTTPS://COMMONS.WIKIMEDIA.ORG/W/INDEX.PHP?CURID=4082998
    The Madtsoiidae is a family of extinct snakes that lived from the Cretaceous period through the Cenozoic era. These snakes were typically large, with some species reaching several meters in length, and they likely functioned as constrictors akin to modern boas and pythons. Fossils of madtsoiid snakes have been unearthed on various continents, indicating a broad geographical distribution during their existence. Carnivorous predators, madtsoiids preyed on a variety of animals, including small dinosaurs, mammals, and other reptiles. Taxonomy within the Madtsoiidae family, encompassing genera like Madtsoia, Wonambi, and Sanajeh, is subject to ongoing research and revision as new fossils are discovered. Madtsoiids became extinct millions of years ago, likely during the late Cenozoic era, possibly due to factors such as climate change, habitat loss and competition with other predators.



    Scott Travers
    I am an American evolutionary biologist, based at Rutgers University, where I specialize in biodiversity, evolution, and genomics. Drop me a note, here. Thanks for your readership and support.
    At 45 ft, it's really more of a dinosaur, right?
    Gene Ching
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  10. #70
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    Man tries smuggling more than 100 snakes in his pants

    Gene Ching
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