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  1. #46
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    ‘It’s moving and it’s huge!’: An 18-foot-long snake on a roof horrified a Detroit neighborhood


    Juliet, the 18-foot-long reticulated python, found her way onto the garage roof on Thursday. (Latonda Harvey/Facebook)

    By Timothy Bella April 19

    If she’d wanted to, Juliet could have probably eaten the dog that was barking at her on Thursday. But the 8-year-old is a friend, not a fighter. Instead, she climbed up onto the garage roof for safety.

    But when dozens of neighbors started to gather in front of the home, snapping photos and live-streaming from their cellphones, they all had the same question: What exactly was an 18-foot-long snake doing on a roof in the middle of Detroit?

    “Oh my God!” exclaimed Latonda Harvey, a neighbor who live-streamed the scene Thursday on Facebook. “It’s moving and it’s huge!”

    The scare-turned-spectacle had residents and police in awe of the reticulated python, a nonvenomous species native to South and Southeast Asia that is the longest snake in the world.

    “She’s about 18 feet long, 18-plus feet, so I can understand people worried about seeing a big snake sitting on top of a garage like that,” Devin Jones-White, her 25-year-old owner, later told WXYZ.

    While it’s unclear how the docile Juliet found her way up to the shingles atop the home in Detroit’s East Seven Mile neighborhood, Jones-White had a theory. As first reported by WXYZ, Jones-White said he did not lock up her cage properly. And he suspected Juliet slithered out toward the front of the home on Thursday afternoon, where one of his dogs probably barked at her. Startled, Juliet made her way to safety — and a part of the home she where hadn’t been before.

    “That’s what snakes do in the wild. They try to get somewhere safe,” he said. “[If] they don’t want to eat it, they’re trying to get away from it.”

    Soon, word got around that a giant snake was on a neighbor’s roof, drawing a curious crowd who had to see it to believe it.

    “Everyone kept coming here, driving by, taking pictures, getting out of their cars and video recording,” neighbor Kashires McReynolds said to FOX 2.

    Once police arrived, one neighbor wondered aloud what authorities could do to address the unorthodox situation.

    “What the flashlight gonna do?” Harvey asked during her live-stream, laughing. “Oh, that’s his walkie-talkie. He’s like, ‘Hell no!’”

    But Juliet’s newfound attention got to the python, Jones-White said. She probably wanted to get as far out of reach as she could in that moment. The anxiety only worsened with the growing neighborhood commotion, he guessed.

    “When everybody came out and crowded around her, she was spooked even more with the crowd,” Jones-White told FOX 2. “That’s why she never came down and stayed up there, doing her own thing.”

    Once Jones-White was alerted, he said he was scared for Juliet. He asked a friend on the scene to make sure police didn’t do anything to the snake. When he arrived, he made his way to the roof to retrieve his 18-foot-long pet. Adults, children and cops alike gawked at the prospect of a human coming so close to a creature of cartoonish length.

    “Is he really about to go up there?” Harvey wondered.

    He did. Slowly but surely, Jones-White began the clunky process of carrying Juliet down the side of the roof. One onlooker could be heard yelling excited obscenities as the rescue unfolded. As he led Juliet down, Jones-White tripped and nearly fell off the roof, perhaps the most drama-filled moment of a situation involving an 18-foot-long snake in residential Detroit. Foot by foot, Jones-White patiently waited as Juliet wrapped around his torso until the 8-year-old made it safely to the ground.

    Embedded video

    Brian Abel

    @BrianAbelTV
    Made a new friend today. This is Juliet and she created quite the scare in a Detroit neighborhood. 😳

    233
    5:04 PM - Apr 18, 2019
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    Brian Abel

    @BrianAbelTV
    · Apr 18, 2019
    Replying to @BrianAbelTV
    He said the dog part to make the point that she is friendly. Has a diet of thawed out rabbits.
    Here is Juliet's owner Devin Jones-White:

    Embedded video

    Brian Abel

    @BrianAbelTV
    The python that escaped in #Detroit and climbed on a roof is now safe and sound.
    See this gal's primetime debut at 11 on @wxyzdetroit pic.twitter.com/9vluYIRu3E

    30
    7:29 PM - Apr 18, 2019
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    Jones-White said he took in Juliet about five years ago from an older couple who had raised her for her first three years. For food, she eats thawed-out rabbits, he said. Since Juliet is nonvenomous, Jones-White told Fox 2 he has a special permit to own the python.

    “She’s been around people her entire life,” Jones-White said to WXYZ. “She was born in captivity, raised in captivity. She doesn’t really know anything about the wild.”

    So why would someone have an 18-foot-long snake native to Asia in a Detroit home? Jones-White is hoping to start a small zoo in the city, something that doesn’t exist in Detroit’s city limits, WXYZ reported. The Detroit Zoo, which hosts more than 1.5 million visitors annually, is actually located in Royal Oak, Mich., about three miles north of the Motor City.

    No one was in danger Thursday, which is par for the course for the species. As The Washington Post’s Amy B Wang and Avi Selk have reported in recent years, the chance of a reticulated python attacking a human is, to put it lightly, rare. Emily Taylor, a professor of biological sciences at California Polytechnic State University, once wrote that the odds of a human getting eaten by a snake like the reticulated python are “lower than the chances of being struck by lightning at the exact same time as winning Mega Millions.”

    Even with that you’ve-got-to-be-kidding-me scenario, there have been at least two recent instances in which people were eaten by a reticulated python. In 2017, a 25-year-old Indonesian man who was missing was gruesomely discovered when villagers cut open a 23-foot-long reticulated python to find the man’s legs, Wang reported. Last year, another Indonesian villager, a 54-year-old woman, was devoured by another 23-foot-long reticulated python so bloated that it could barely move, Selk wrote.

    Despite Juliet’s impressive length, she does not come close to being the longest python of her kind. That honor goes to Medusa, who, at 25 feet, 2 inches, is the longest snake ever recorded in captivity, according to Guinness World Records. In 2011, the 350-pound reticulated python needed 15 men to hold her to be measured at full length. Based out of Kansas City, Mo., Medusa shares Juliet’s taste for rabbits but also devours hogs and deer, according to her owner, Full Moon Productions.

    Inevitably, the excitement near East Seven Mile gave way to exhaustion. And the only one to blame was Juliet, the reticulated python on the roof.


    “I’m gonna need a drink after this one,” Harvey said.

    Correction: A previous version of this article said the Detroit Zoo is about 13 miles northwest of Detroit. It is approximately three miles north of the city.
    That's a big snake...
    Gene Ching
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  2. #47
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    Florida trappers capture record-setting python in Everglades
    By THE ASSOCIATED PRESSBIG
    CYPRESS NATIONAL PRESERVE, Fla. — Oct 6, 2019, 12:15 PM ET


    In this Sept. 22, 2019 photo from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Florida trappers Jonathan Lopez, left, and Cynthia Downer pose with a record-setting python they captured at the Big Cypress National Preserve, west of Miami, Fla. A statement by the Fish and Wildlife Commission says it was the largest snake captured by the new Python Action Team and the largest ever captured at the Big Cypress National Preserve. The agency says it is the second-largest python ever caught in the wild in Florida. (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
    Officials say Florida trappers have captured a record-setting python as part of a growing effort that encourages hunters to remove the invasive snakes from the Everglades.

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission says the 18-foot, 4-inch-long (5.58 meters) female python weighed 98 pounds and 10 ounces (45 kilograms). A statement by the Fish and Wildlife Commission says it was the largest snake captured by the new Python Action Team and the largest ever captured at the Big Cypress National Preserve, west of Miami.

    The agency says it is the second-largest python ever caught in the wild in Florida. The commission says hunting female Burmese pythons is critical because they add between 30 and 60 hatchlings each time they breed.
    That's a lotta snake.
    Gene Ching
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  3. #48
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    Choked out

    Woman found dead with a python wrapped around her neck in a home with 140 snakes
    By Allen Kim and Rebekah Riess, CNN
    Updated 10:19 AM ET, Fri November 1, 2019

    (CNN)A woman was found dead with an 8-foot python snake wrapped around her neck, according to Indiana State Police.
    The snake was a reticulated python, which is native to southeast Asia and is considered to be the longest snake in the world.
    The Benton County dispatch in Oxford, Indiana, received a 911 call Wednesday night after Laura Hurst, 36, was found unresponsive.


    Laura Hurst was found dead with a reticulated python wrapped around her neck.
    Medics arrived and attempted life-saving measures on her but were unsuccessful.

    Police say there were 140 snakes at the property, and that approximately 20 of the snakes belong to Hurst. According to police, Hurst frequented the property "about twice a week."
    The home is owned by Benton County Sheriff Donald Munson, according to property records. Munson did not return a CNN call for comment Thursday afternoon.
    Munson told the Lafayette Journal & Courier that Hurst's death was a "tragic accident" and that he was "being fully cooperative with everybody."
    Indiana State Police Sgt. Kim Riley told CNN that no one lives in the home and that it had been renovated and set up specifically for the collection of snakes.
    He said that Hurst was "apparently there checking on her snakes. For whatever reason, she apparently got the snake out and she was doing what people do with snakes."
    Riley said that the snake may have caused Hurst's death and that an autopsy will be performed on Friday to provide an official cause of death.

    CNN's Tanika Gray contributed to this story.
    What a horrible way to go. And on Halloween no less.

    Wonder what became of the snake...
    Gene Ching
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  4. #49
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    xmas in oz

    Woman finds 10-foot python in her Christmas tree
    By Amy Woodyatt, CNN
    Updated 6:05 AM ET, Fri December 13, 2019


    Leanne Chapman was alerted to the python's presence by birds "kicking off on the balcony."

    (CNN)There are many ways to decorate a Christmas tree -- from monotone minimalism to old-school kitsch.
    But for one woman in Australia, the seasonal theme was very big snakes, when she got home to find a 10-foot python adorning her tree.
    Leanne Chapman and her partner returned to their home in Brisbane, Queensland on Thursday, and noticed a commotion on their balcony.
    "We came home from work and there's a couple of butcher birds that visit every day and they were just kicking off on the balcony, going crazy," Chapman told CNN affiliate 7News.


    The snake eventually slithered away.

    Chapman, who is originally from England, told 7News that her partner started to video the birds, and leaning on the tree -- not realizing what lay wrapped around it.
    "As he's turned around and stepped back, he didn't realise he was leaning on the Christmas tree with the snake wrapped around it," she told 7News.
    The couple left the snake alone, and later that night, it slithered away.
    "It wasn't bothered by us. It just stayed there for a good few hours as we watched it through the window," Chapman said.
    It was only when the reptile moved from its position that the couple realized how big it was.
    "It was big -- really big," Chapman said.
    "After the initial shock wore off, it was a really beautiful snake," she said.
    "It was actually quite nice to see it that close up because I've never seen anything like it before," she added.
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    Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays
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  5. #50
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    whole lotta nope

    We had a tarantula invasion this year in our area. My cousin, who lives in SF's sunset district, found one in his house. He told me about that last Wednesday.

    I'll take tarantulas over pythons.

    ENVIRONMENT JANUARY 17, 2020 / 4:23 AM / UPDATED 3 HOURS AGO
    'It was going for my throat': Florida python hunters wrestle invasive snakes
    Zachary ***enson
    4 MIN READ

    OCHOPEE, Fla. (Reuters) - Thomas Aycock’s life flashed before his eyes one night in the Everglades as a 13-foot Burmese python squeezed his arm and a leg in its coils. Aycock, who was trying to bag the snake by himself, still recalls feeling its tail across his back.


    Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission staff bag an invasive Burmese python in the Everglades Wildlife Management Area, Florida June 23, 2019. FWC/Alicia Wellman/Handout via REUTERS

    “I knew what it was doing, it was going for my throat,” said the 54-year-old Florida Army National Guard major who was able to wrestle free during that incident in the summer of 2018. “I said to myself, ‘It can’t go down like this.’”

    That scare has not stopped him from returning again and again to the sprawling wetland, devoting almost every spare moment to searching the thick brush and sawgrass for more snakes, as he was doing during this interview.

    The state encourages hunters to capture or kill the giant, invasive south Asian snakes that are decimating local wildlife. Dozens of hunters are prowling the Everglades during Florida’s 10-day Python Bowl, which ends Monday. Armed with long metal hooks that resemble fireplace pokers and bags, many hunters catch the snakes and take them in live.

    Those who take the most longest and heaviest pythons each will win $2,000 in cash. Other prizes include off-road vehicles.

    Aycock and his fellow hunters are spending days and nights slowly creeping across the webs of levees that span the Everglades by foot, bicycle and souped-up SUV looking for the glint of an eye or the shine of brown and black scales.

    First found in the Everglades around the year 2000, the snakes were introduced by pet owners and possibly a snake research facility that was destroyed when Hurricane Andrew struck the region in 1992.

    The behemoths, some of which measure more than 18 feet (5.5 m) long and weigh more than 100 pounds (45 kg), have wreaked havoc on the fragile ecosystem. A 2012 study in Everglades National Park by the United States Geological Survey found 99% fewer raccoons, 98% fewer opossums and 87% fewer bobcats. Massive snakes have even been found trying to eat alligators.

    “I saw an opossum last night out on the levee and it was the first small animal I’ve seen in probably five or six months,” Aycock said.

    Agencies including the South Florida Water Management District and the Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commission have all launched python removal programs in recent years, offering hunters hourly wages and bonuses depending on the size and weight.

    According to a 2019 report, contracted python hunters brought in about 1,900 snakes since the program launched in March 2017.

    The success has been hard fought. Despite their size and numbers, which some estimate in the hundreds of thousands, Aycock said it can take eight hours on average to find a snake.

    From the start of the program to mid-2018, the most current data available, hunters working for both agencies spent 14,000 hours in the field yielding 1,186 snakes. Some larger females have been found holding up to 100 eggs.

    “We’re targeting removal in bird rookeries, in sensitive ecological areas, so regardless of the snakes’ population we know every one removed makes a difference,” said Kristen Sommers, the state’s wildlife impact management section leader.

    Yet on Wednesday night, finding even one proved impossible for Aycock. The cooler weather meant the cold-blooded serpents stayed hidden and out of sight.

    “Every python removed out of this ecosystem serves a purpose in restoring this ecosystem,” Aycock said. “We have a good time out here, but it’s also a mission we take seriously and are willing to work at.”

    Editing by Scott Malone and David Gregorio
    Gene Ching
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  6. #51
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    Snakes and Coronovirus

    I liked the Bat theory better (although there is a connection)

    Snakes could be the source of the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak
    By Haitao Guo, Guangxiang "George" Luo and Shou-Jiang Gao, The Conversation
    Updated 6:32 AM ET, Thu January 23, 2020

    (CNN)Snakes -- the Chinese krait and the Chinese cobra -- may be the original source of the newly discovered coronavirus that has triggered an outbreak of a deadly infectious respiratory illness in China this winter.
    The many-banded krait (Bungarus multicinctus), also known as the Taiwanese krait or the Chinese krait, is a highly venomous species of elapid snake found in much of central and southern China and Southeast Asia.
    The illness was first reported in late December 2019 in Wuhan, a major city in central China, and has been rapidly spreading. Since then, sick travelers from Wuhan have infected people in China and other countries, including the United States.
    Using samples of the virus isolated from patients, scientists in China have determined the genetic code of the virus and used microscopes to photograph it. The pathogen responsible for this pandemic is a new coronavirus. It's in the same family of viruses as the well-known severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), which have killed hundreds of people in the past 17 years. The World Health Organization (WHO) has named the new coronavirus 2019-nCoV.
    We are virologists and journal editors and are closely following this outbreak because there are many questions that need to be answered to curb the spread of this public health threat.
    What is a coronavirus?
    The name of coronavirus comes from its shape, which resembles a crown or solar corona when imaged using an electron microscope.
    The electron microscopic image, reveals the crown shape structural details for which the coronavirus was named. This image is of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
    Coronavirus is transmitted through the air and primarily infects the upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tract of mammals and birds. Though most of the members of the coronavirus family only cause mild flu-like symptoms during infection, SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV can infect both upper and lower airways and cause severe respiratory illness and other complications in humans.
    This new 2019-nCoV causes similar symptoms to SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV. People infected with these coronaviruses suffer a severe inflammatory response.
    Unfortunately, there is no approved vaccine or antiviral treatment available for coronavirus infection. A better understanding of the life cycle of 2019-nCoV, including the source of the virus, how it is transmitted and how it replicates are needed to both prevent and treat the disease.

    Zoonotic transmission
    Both SARS and MERS are classified as zoonotic viral diseases, meaning the first patients who were infected acquired these viruses directly from animals. This was possible because while in the animal host, the virus had acquired a series of genetic mutations that allowed it to infect and multiply inside humans.
    Now these viruses can be transmitted from person to person. Field studies have revealed that the original source of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is the bat, and that the masked palm civets (a mammal native to Asia and Africa) and camels, respectively, served as intermediate hosts between bats and humans.
    In the case of this 2019 coronavirus outbreak, reports state that most of the first group of patients hospitalized were workers or customers at a local seafood wholesale market which also sold processed meats and live consumable animals including poultry, donkeys, sheep, pigs, camels, foxes, badgers, bamboo rats, hedgehogs and reptiles. However, since no one has ever reported finding a coronavirus infecting aquatic animals, it is plausible that the coronavirus may have originated from other animals sold in that market.
    The hypothesis that the 2019-nCoV jumped from an animal at the market is strongly supported by a new publication in the Journal of Medical Virology. The scientists conducted an analysis and compared the genetic sequences of 2019-nCoV and all other known coronaviruses.
    The study of the genetic code of 2019-nCoV reveals that the new virus is most closely related to two bat SARS-like coronavirus samples from China, initially suggesting that, like SARS and MERS, the bat might also be the origin of 2019-nCoV. The authors further found that the viral RNA coding sequence of 2019-nCoV spike protein, which forms the "crown" of the virus particle that recognizes the receptor on a host cell, indicates that the bat virus might have mutated before infecting people.
    How influenza jumped from animals to humans
    But when the researchers performed a more detailed bioinformatics analysis of the sequence of 2019-nCoV, it suggests that this coronavirus might come from snakes.
    The Wuhan Huanan Wholesale Seafood Market, where the coronavirus outbreak is believed to have started, is now closed.

    From bats to snakes
    The researchers used an analysis of the protein codes favored by the new coronavirus and compared it to the protein codes from coronaviruses found in different animal hosts, like birds, snakes, marmots, hedgehogs, manis, bats and humans. Surprisingly, they found that the protein codes in the 2019-nCoV are most similar to those used in snakes.
    Snakes often hunt for bats in wild. Reports indicate that snakes were sold in the local seafood market in Wuhan, raising the possibility that the 2019-nCoV might have jumped from the host species -- bats -- to snakes and then to humans at the beginning of this coronavirus outbreak. However, how the virus could adapt to both the cold-blooded and warm-blooded hosts remains a mystery.
    The authors of the report and other researchers must verify the origin of the virus through laboratory experiments. Searching for the 2019-nCoV sequence in snakes would be the first thing to do. However, since the outbreak, the seafood market has been disinfected and shut down, which makes it challenging to trace the new virus' source animal.
    3 reasons the US is not ready for a pandemic
    Sampling viral RNA from animals sold at the market and from wild snakes and bats is needed to confirm the origin of the virus. Nonetheless, the reported findings will also provide insights for developing prevention and treatment protocols.
    The 2019-nCoV outbreak is another reminder that people should limit the consumption of wild animals to prevent zoonotic infections.
    THREADS
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    Gene Ching
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  7. #52
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    Revenge of the baby snake

    Drunk Man Dies After Biting Venomous Baby Snake in Apparent Revenge Attack
    Jack Beresford 6 days ago
    A man in India has died after chewing on a baby snake in an apparent revenge attack on the reptile.


    © Evgenyi_Eg/Getty Stock image of a small snake - a man in India died after biting a venomous baby snake.
    According to the Times of India, Rama Mahto, 65, captured and bit a baby viper in retaliation for an earlier attack outside his home in the village of Madhodeh in the Nalanda district of Bihar.

    Mahto, who was allegedly under the influence of alcohol at the time, was sitting out the front of his house on Sunday when the baby snake reportedly bit him on the leg.

    He eventually managed to capture the viper and, in a surprising twist, decided to enact his own unique form of vengeance on the animal, reported India TV.

    In a statement issued to police and reported by the news outlet, Mahto's family said he was "bitten more than 10 times" on the face while chewing the snake.

    He eventually discarded the reptile in a nearby tree.

    Despite his family urging him to go to the hospital and seek treatment, "he refused and went to sleep" believing the snake's bite carried no venom due to its age.

    Mahto went to bed and was found dead on Monday morning. The official cause of death has not yet been recorded.

    Untreated venomous snakebites are a serious problem in several regions of the world.

    The U.K. Centre for Snakebite Research & Interventions (CSRI) estimates that snakebites kill 81,000 to 138,000 people annually.

    A further 400,000 victims are also left with permanent physical disabilities and disfigurements as a result of venomous animal bites of this kind.

    "It is the rural impoverished African and Asian communities, and particularly the most economically important and educationally vulnerable 10-30 year olds, that suffer disproportionately high rates of snakebite mortality and morbidity," the CSRI states.

    Another recent story from the U.K, has further highlighted the dangers of leaving a snake bite untreated.

    An 11-year-old schoolgirl ended up being hospitalized after she was bitten by a venomous adder while out walking with her family.

    Grace Roys' father did not initially believe she had been bitten by a snake, given how rare attacks of this kind are in the U.K.

    However, he soon realized something was amiss when she began to suffer with stomach pains and vomiting while her foot eventually turned black and blue.

    She went on to spend several days in the hospital, during which time her leg swelled to three times its normal size. Worse still, doctors discovered some of the adder's venom had reached her kidneys.

    Newsweek has reached out for the Centre for Snakebite Research & Interventions for comment.
    According to some reports, this drunk dude bit the baby snake in revenge. When you walk the road of revenge, dig two graves.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    We had a tarantula invasion this year in our area. My cousin, who lives in SF's sunset district, found one in his house. He told me about that last Wednesday.

    I'll take tarantulas over pythons.
    My friend got his first ball python 2weeks ago. It's not that long but I guess he can sustain its needs.

  9. #54
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    Cobra

    Indian man gets life sentence for killing wife with cobra
    By Joshua Rhett Miller
    October 15, 2021 9:54am Updated

    An Indian court has found a man guilty of murdering his wife with a cobra


    A man in India convicted of murdering his wife with a cobra has been sentenced to life in prison.

    Sooraj Kumar, 28, was handed the sentence Wednesday for killing his wife, Uthra, 25, in May 2020 in what prosecutors dubbed the “rarest of rare” cases, Agence France-Press reported.

    Prosecutors said Kumar, a bank employee, was unhappy in his marriage and feared that divorcing Uthra would force him to return a large dowry, including a new car and roughly $20,000 in cash.

    Kumar, who was convicted of murder Monday after pleading not guilty, first decided last March to set loose a highly venomous Russell’s viper in Uthra’s bedroom, where she was bitten by the snake and spent nearly two months in a hospital, authorities said.

    As she recovered afterward at her parents’ house, prosecutors said Kumar carried out his twisted plot using a cobra that he obtained from a snake handler and tossed it at his sleeping wife, prosecutors said.

    Kumar even stayed in the room after his wife was bitten and continued about his morning routine when alerted by Uthra’s mother the following day, prosecutors said.

    “The mode of execution and the diabolic plan of the accused to murder Uthra, his wife who was bedridden, makes it [the case] fall into the category of rarest of rare,” a prosecutor who sought the death penalty said.


    Sooraj Kumar was unhappy in his marriage and feared that divorcing his wife would force him to return a large dowry, so he set a snake loose in her bedroom.
    Getty Images/iStockphoto
    Uthra’s parents became suspicious of their son-in-law after he tried to take control of her property after she died, Agence France-Press reported.

    Kumar was sentenced after being found guilty of murder in the state of Kerala, NBC News reported. Prosecutors accused him of marrying his wife for financial gain and conspiring to kill her upon becoming dissatisfied in their marriage.

    “If he divorces her, he will have to part with all her wealth,” assistant superintendent of Kerala police Hariram Shankar told NBC News. “If he kills her through an explicit murder weapon, the wealth would also have to be returned. So he wanted to get rid of her through something that would resemble an accident.”

    But the woman’s death was clearly a “well-planned murder,” Shankar said.

    The snake handler, identified only as Suresh, was also arrested for supplying the snakes to Kumar, the Indian Express reported.

    Fatal snakebites in India are not uncommon, according to NBC News, citing World Health Organization data showing 1.2 million such deaths from 2000 through 2019.

    The country’s Supreme Court, meanwhile, has suggested murder by snake may be part of a growing trend in India, where another man, Krishna Kumar, was one of three defendants accused of murdering a woman from Rajasthan in June 2019 by leaving a poisonous snake in a bag near her bed.

    India’s Supreme Court denied bail to Kumar on Oct. 6 in the slaying of Subodh Devi, NBC News reported.

    Devi was killed after she found out her daughter-in-law, Alpana, was having an affair, court documents show. When confronted by Devi, Alpana and her partner allegedly went to a snake charmer with Kumar and bought a poisonous snake that bit Devi, killing her.
    cold blooded murderer
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