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Thread: Distance Training Kung Fu & Tai Chi

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    5,096
    Go to plumblossom.net, and find the link for GM Doc Fai Wong's e-mail. He'll answer your questions.
    The weakest of all weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
    ~ Mark Twain

    Everyone has a plan until they’ve been hit.
    ~ Joe Lewis

    A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
    ~ Author unknown

    "You don't feel lonely.Because you have a lively monkey"

    "Ninja can HURT the Spartan, but the Spartan can KILL the Ninja"

  2. #17
    I have emailed him and received a email this morning thanks.

  3. #18
    Any update?

  4. #19
    he has sent me the email, Im just waiting on my check to reach him, its only $50 1 time fee, then you have to buy the videos from the producers, Once you are his student he will then tell you which videos to start with and you will record yourself when it comes time for him to grade you and send to him with a small fee for his critics. Sounds pretty solid. He also said that what else is available for me if i ever get any vacation time i could come in for private lessons and corrections.

    So im gonna do it. Plumblossome.net one anyway.


    - Freebird
    "You have been weighed, you have been measured, and you have been found wanting. In what world would you have ever beaten me?"

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    5,096

    Modern Distance Learning

    Some of us have careers that lead us all over the place, and those places are usually nowhere near a good CLF teacher. For a long time I simply learned from whoever was teaching on the post gym. The usual offerings are karate in some form, krav maga, and for a while I was learning from a Praying Mantis instructor.

    It seems nowadays that distance learning is more attainable, but I still feel that many IT resources are not being tapped for this. While your videos of your techniques and forms are able to be reviewed well within 24 hours, with feedback coming shortly after, I also feel that maybe virtual sessions are possible via webcam, along with forums so correspondence students might compare and make recommendations to one another. Even a virtual training log/schedule might be in order.

    Looking to the future, maybe someday we could implement biometric tracking of movement during reviews, allowing the teacher to see things he/she might not be able to see on the video. Virtual reality is another option, but it seems that with the exception of the medical field, it isn't really going anywhere as a tech.

    In the Army, VTCs are very common downrange. We also have computers tracking our bullet trajectories on the range, and numerous forms of collecting training data. I wonder how we could add that to CLF training for those who aren't fortunate enough to live in CA, FL, China, HK, or Australia.
    The weakest of all weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
    ~ Mark Twain

    Everyone has a plan until they’ve been hit.
    ~ Joe Lewis

    A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
    ~ Author unknown

    "You don't feel lonely.Because you have a lively monkey"

    "Ninja can HURT the Spartan, but the Spartan can KILL the Ninja"

  6. #21

    distance learning

    Hi all,

    I am looking at a distance learning course for qi gong theory, anyone have any opinions on these courses? i am up in sunny northumberland and i am really struggling to find a qi gong class most are usually tai chi with a little qi gong insight anyone with any info i would be grateful.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Whippany NJ, USA
    Posts
    1,550
    Well, that's pretty hard to find.

    Al Simon has a great distance learning Qigong course, it is part of his tai chi training, but you will get a lot out of it anyways.
    My Martial Arts articles archive:

    http://www.bgtent.com/naturalcma/index.htm

    Shaolin Qigong / Neigong Healing & Self Defense Programs and Seminars:

    http://www.jindaolife.com
    http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/index.html

    Qigong Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/QigongProgram.htm
    Chinese Martial Art Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchoo...ArtProgram.htm


  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    19
    Thanks for mentioning me, Sal.

    Ninetoes, if you are looking for theory, I'm not certain my stuff would be right for you. We are mostly a Chi Development course (rather than strictly a Qigong or Tai Chi course) which might fit what you want, but we're mostly focused on practice rather than theory, which doesn't fit. And we mostly work with the "average person" who wants to learn Chi Development, rather than the die-hard practitioners and martial artists.

    But you are welcome to check it out. There's enough free stuff the first few weeks on the list to give you an idea of what we're about.

    Thanks,
    Al

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Whippany NJ, USA
    Posts
    1,550
    Even though I have been practicing, learning, etc Qigong since 1980 and teaching for over a decade, I got a LOT out of your course anyways.

    I knew all the theory, what it helped me with was organizing the material better (which helped me teach beginners better) and double checking that all the physical details are being done correctly (what to make sure my students are doing so that I don't do monkey see monkey do teaching).
    My Martial Arts articles archive:

    http://www.bgtent.com/naturalcma/index.htm

    Shaolin Qigong / Neigong Healing & Self Defense Programs and Seminars:

    http://www.jindaolife.com
    http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/index.html

    Qigong Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/QigongProgram.htm
    Chinese Martial Art Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchoo...ArtProgram.htm


  10. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Whippany NJ, USA
    Posts
    1,550
    If you just want theory, then you are better off with a book.

    "Zen Body Mind Being" is an amazing book by Peter Ralston.
    He has a newer book that is 5 inches thick, but also amazing.

    Bruce Frantzis has a great book out called "The Great Stillness" that I would recommend.

    There are other great books out as well. You'd have to be more clear about what exactly you want.
    Qigong theory starting from scratch?

    Also, I'm pretty sure that Bruce Frantzis does indeed have a qigong theory distance learning thing set up. It concentrates on meditation.
    My Martial Arts articles archive:

    http://www.bgtent.com/naturalcma/index.htm

    Shaolin Qigong / Neigong Healing & Self Defense Programs and Seminars:

    http://www.jindaolife.com
    http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/index.html

    Qigong Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchool/QigongProgram.htm
    Chinese Martial Art Program: http://www.bgtent.com/CMAQigongSchoo...ArtProgram.htm


  11. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Canzonieri View Post
    Even though I have been practicing, learning, etc Qigong since 1980 and teaching for over a decade, I got a LOT out of your course anyways.

    I knew all the theory, what it helped me with was organizing the material better (which helped me teach beginners better) and double checking that all the physical details are being done correctly (what to make sure my students are doing so that I don't do monkey see monkey do teaching).
    Thanks, Sal. I appreciate your comments and your support.

    Books are a good suggestion. You mentioned some good books. My favorite theory book is The Root of Chinese Qigong by Yang Jwing-ming. Though it does promote mostly his teachings, there's some good general info and it reads a lot like a Qigong "textbook".

    Best wishes,
    Al

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Toronto, Ont. Canada
    Posts
    47
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/48083739/C...Kung-Institute

    you may choose to find a torrent but that is a copy right issue. But you could search the title enjoy
    By Peace or by Pieces.

    You are a human being, not a human doing.
    J Bradshaw.

    Out beyond the ideas of wrong doing and right doing, there is a field. I will meet you there.
    Rumi

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,071

    Who here is doing ZOOM classes?

    Kung fu Master Helps Students Kick the Blues
    ByChang Jun October 27, 2020

    Lu Xiaohong puts students through their paces in an online class in California on Saturday. During the past six months, she has taught 3,000 students martial arts. [For China Daily]

    Lu Xiaohong, a kung fu master in the San Francisco Bay Area, could never have imagined just how much she is cheering up people in a pandemic with her teaching of the Chinese martial art.

    Offering free online lessons every Wednesday since early April, the 40-year-old aims to empower her students — more than 3,000 so far and coming from all backgrounds — by not only helping them improve their physiques but instilling in them the wisdom of kung fu. After 30 years of practice, Lu has much knowledge to impart via the one-hour lessons on the Zoom platform.

    One of the tenets Lu has taught her students is: "Endurance is one of the most difficult disciplines, but it is to the one who endures that the final victory comes."

    And, with the coronavirus pandemic still raging in the United States, she tells them: "A strong will plus optimism will eventually overpower panic, loss and frustrations. We will win."

    In mid-March, California announced a stay-at-home order to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus, which led to the temporary closure of the martial arts studio where Lu teaches.

    "I told my students at our last in-person gathering that we have to pause for a while," she said. "We thought this shutdown was not going to be long."

    With no timetable for a reopening in California, many students sought advice from Lu on how to stay upbeat and fit.

    "I knew it was the time to give back to the community," Lu said. "The first idea coming into my mind was to teach martial arts online."

    After she shared the Zoom link through social media platforms, Lu said she was "thrilled to see how quickly the slots filled up."

    "I felt there is a need for an outlet, a channel that everyone could utilize to alleviate anxiety and resume strength," she said.

    A national martial arts champion in China in the categories of long fist and staff, with her first award in 2001, Lu moved to the US two years ago.

    She hoped her expertise could help bolster cross-cultural, people-to-people exchanges.

    Settling down in Silicon Valley in 2018, she accepted an offer to work as a leading coach at a martial arts studio. Soon after, kung fu lovers in the Bay Area created a word-of-mouth buzz about "a new woman master from China "who knows how to teach.

    "My students are made up of a mix of races, cultures and backgrounds," said Lu. "You hear them talking with distinctive accents-Latino, Indian, Chinese, African American, Korean and Japanese. They're a very diverse group."

    Lu considers each student a unique individual who will benefit from the balanced approach and the discipline required of martial arts — the external training of the hands, eyes, posture and stance, as well as the internal training of the spirit, the mind and inner peace.

    Skanda, 7, had been a student of Lu's for two years. A shy boy at first, he tried to avoid Lu's gaze and couldn't perform the basic movements. To ignite his enthusiasm, Lu "played video clips starring Bruce Lee and Jackie Chan, and told students anecdotes associated with the two iconic masters."

    "Of course, I emphasize why self-confidence and self-challenging can transform a person," Lu said.

    It worked. Skanda gradually opened up after four to five classes — he kicks, punches, sweeps and jumps. He talks loudly and clearly.

    "One day, he told me that he wanted to be a kung fu master," Lu said. "His parents reported that the boy spends hours and hours practicing routines."

    Beginning of the Journey

    Lu wouldn't have embarked on her long, arduous martial arts journey without her father's resolve. Born in a small town in Shandong Province in East China, Lu was often sick as a child. To improve her health, her father sent her to a martial arts training center when she turned six.

    "The daily routine was like I needed to get up at 5:30 am, finish two hours of morning drills before I could have breakfast," she said. "Day in, day out, it's not uncommon that I had bruises, injuries, blisters often."

    There were many times she wanted to quit. "It was too much for a kid," she said.

    However, her father would borrow philosophy from martial arts to inspire Lu to continue. "For example, 'the last leg of a journey marks the halfway point', so 'to persevere means victory'."

    Those efforts yielded fruit.
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