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Thread: Kung Fu Restaurants & Bars

  1. #16
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    Now we're cookin!

    The link for KUNGFU below is worth a click. It's in Chinese, but still interesting.
    American Lorain Signs Contracts With Two Popular Chain Restaurants in China

    JUNAN COUNTY, China, Sept. 22 /PRNewswire-Asia-FirstCall/ -- American Lorain Corporation (NYSE AMEX: ALN) ("American Lorain" or the "Company"), an international processed foods company based in Shandong Province, People's Republic of China ("PRC"), today announced that it has started cooperating with KUNGFU Catering Management Co., Ltd. ("KUNGFU") and CSC Catering Management Co., Ltd. ("CSC").

    Under the cooperation agreement with KUNGFU, American Lorain will distribute beef products, mixed vegetables, and frozen chestnut kernels for a total sales value of up to RMB 14.4 million (approximately $2.1 million) to be delivered throughout 2010. The Company has already begun supplying CSC with frozen vegetables and chestnuts and is currently in negotiations with CSC headquarters to determine the distribution of more products. The Company estimates that the increased cooperation with CSC may add approximately RMB 60.0 million (approximately $8.8 million) in revenue for fiscal year 2010.

    These cooperation agreements are part of American Lorain's strategy to strengthen domestic sales channels through shifting sales to agents and entering into new market places like large- to mid-sized restaurant chains. In 2008, the Company signed a distribution contract with Yum! Brands China Division to provide frozen, canned and bulk food products for its restaurants. The Company continues to distribute products under the contract.

    "We are honored to cooperate with KUNGFU and CSC and believe we can provide these restaurant chains with a stable supply of high-quality food products and superior services, thus helping them eliminate food safety concerns and the need to establish stricter quality control standards," said Mr. Si Chen, Chief Executive Officer of American Lorain. "In recent years, chain restaurants have grown in popularity in China for their convenience, consistent quality, and neatness. Cooperating with them should help us reach a broader consumer base domestically."

    About KUNGFU Catering Management Co., Ltd

    KUNGFU Catering Management Co., Ltd was founded in 1994. As China's first chain restaurant to achieve the Chinese Fast Food Standardization certificate, KUNGFU has adhered to international standards on quality, service and sanitation. Currently, KUNGFU operates 332 restaurants in Guangzhou, Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Hangzhou, Suzhou and other major cities, and is becoming one of the leading Chinese fast food brands. For more information, please visit http://www.zkungfu.com .

    About CSC Catering Management Co., Ltd.

    CSC ("Country Style Cooking") Catering Management Co., Ltd. was established in Chongqing in 1996 and operates based on a model by the American CSC International Management Corporation. CSC is the leading healthy fast food brand in the southwestern China and currently owns 70 restaurants in Chongqing. The chain plans to open more than 100 restaurants under its own control in municipalities and provincial capitals throughout China, expanding to Shanghai, Chengdu, Xi'an and other cities within the next three years. For more information, please visit http://www.csc100.com .

    About American Lorain Corporation

    American Lorain Corporation ("American Lorain" or the "Company") is a Delaware corporation that develops, manufactures and sells various food products. The Company's products include chestnut products; convenience foods products (including ready-to-cook foods, ready-to-eat foods, and meals-ready-to-eat); and frozen, canned and bulk foods products. The Company currently sells over 234 products to 26 provinces and administrative regions in China as well as to 42 foreign countries. The Company operates through its four direct and indirect subsidiaries and one leased factory located in China. For more information about American Lorain, please visit our website at http://www.americanlorain.com .

    Forward-Looking Statements

    Statements contained herein that relate to the Company's future performance, including statements with respect to forecasted revenues, margins, cash generation and capital expenditures are "forward-looking statements." Such statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control, which may cause actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from those anticipated. Such statements are based on current expectations only, and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those anticipated, estimated or projected. Among the factors that could cause actual results to materially differ include: general business and economic conditions, particularly the current downturn in the worldwide economy; our ability to obtain adequate supplies of raw materials; our ability to manage our expansion strategy; changes in foreign currency exchange rates; government regulation; difficulties in new product development; changing consumer tastes in disparate markets worldwide and our ability to address those changes; our ability to attract and retain highly qualified personnel; and other factors affecting our operations that are set forth in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2008 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward- looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #17
    The is just a Restaurant with the Name Kung Fu and some decorations.

    I thought it was like the one in China I was told about from Yee Chi Wai.

    It was a restaurant but also had a performance.

    The Waiters were skilled in martial arts and you could order a demonstration from an actual Menu that listed various Hand, weapon and partner forms.

    I'm not kidding.

    Now if this was to open up here in the states then it would be pretty cool.

    There was once a bar in NYC that was Martial Arts themed decorations andalways had some movie playing.

    Once even the Palladium (showing my age ) had a Kung Fu Fighting Night complete with movies and demonstrations while the DJ had the dance floor packed.

  3. #18
    my brothers and I have the ideas long ago.

    kung fu pictures on the wall, tai chi 24 postures, shaolin hong fist, tan tui 12 roads, shuai jiao ba zi--- basic jian shu or dao shu, basic poles and spears postures

    kung fu moves/styles names for the menu for the foods

    but we give up, may be we just like to eat and not to think about kung fu anymore.

    b/c we are not in a training hall anymore.

    there are names for legends of water margins for the food names

    such as wu song bao zi

    lin chong (bao zi tou, leopard head) noodle

    song jiang soup

    --

  4. #19
    I heard of a place like this where I live ,it is called Kung Fu'od Chinese fast food!!!I havent seen it yet but am going to look.

  5. #20
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WQ65DM8c1I4

    the most famous bao zi is gou bu li from Tian Jin

    Gou zi was a boy abandoned by his father. He made good bao zi. it was so popular that many people came and waited in line. He was so busy that he ignored them. thus gou bu li.

    Yuan Shi Kai was training new army officers for Qing at Tian Jin.

    Yuan liked it much. He presented it to empress Ci Xi. She liked it, too. It became an imperial item.

    --

    nowadays, they imported flour from cananda and australia. and mixed them half and half to make the dough.

    if you are really into money making, try start a chain in your country.


  6. #21

  7. #22
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    More on Kung Fu Tacos

    I got to follow there tweets and find this truck...
    Social networking driving lunch trucks
    Monday, October 05, 2009 | 7:05 AM
    By Kristen Sze

    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- From the East Bay, to San Francisco, to the Peninsula, it seems everywhere you look - there's a sudden explosion in lunch trucks. But these are not your father's lunch trucks; they are serving up innovative cuisine and driving in profits, thanks to social networking.

    Roast duck with mango salsa and grilled chicken with garlic ginger sauce, doesn't sound like your standard taco toppings. But then again, Kung Fu Tacos in San Francisco's Financial District, is not your standard food truck.

    "We took traditional Chinese flavors, married it with traditional Mexican tacos," said Jonathan Ward of Kung Fu Tacos.

    But there's nothing traditional about Kung Fu Tacos' business approach; its part of a new generation of lunch trucks in the Bay Area, serving high-end cuisine, in what used to be thought of as the lowest of culinary purveyors.

    In San Francisco, there is Spencer on the Go, operated by French restaurant Chez Spencer; where you can nosh on escargot, sweetbreads or frog legs and curry. In Emeryville, there's Seoul on Wheels, cooking up tacos with Korean barbeque meat, garnished with daikon and cream.

    "It's so awesome food trucks showing up. Because they're so delicious, they seem like they're exploring new food territory," said customer Kelly Booth.

    Bay Area foodies indulging their champagne tastes on a beer budget are gobbling up the entrees almost always priced under $10.

    "It's good in a recession. That's for sure," said customer Chris Kilkes.

    The recession is one factor in the sudden explosion of food trucks. Many cooks with a dream can't afford to open a restaurant, but can buy a truck for under $20,000. And once they have that truck, they go straight into fast lane of the information super highway. This new wave of food truck operators is using tech to grow their business, using Twitter to spread the word on the promotions, locations and more.

    It makes sense given the co-owners of Kung Fu Tacos and the operator of Seoul on Wheels has all worked in high-tech. They send out daily tweets, each has nearly 1,000 followers.

    "I might decide to do a special the night before or the day of, so it's a really good way for me to let people know, come to get this, it's really tasty," said Seoul on Wheels owner Julia Yoon.

    "When I do our night gigs, we tweet about that usually a couple days ahead of time, so people have time to plan," said Ward.

    And if you ask customers, many say they're here because of what they read on Yelp, Facebook or Twitter.

    "My buddy put it up on Facebook. So I looked it up online and saw it was only five blocks away," said customer Jamie Abenojar.

    These haute cuisine trucks are well aware social networking can also destroy them, if customers have a negative experience. They say that's why they work hard to keep their trucks clean, their food fresh and just as important, their Twitter accounts active.

    "I think I might have been successful, but it might have taken longer. It's like tweet of mouth, instead of word of mouth. It's just faster, it's just instant," said Yoon.

    San Francisco's famous upscale Vietnamese restaurant, Slanted Door, is even planning to start a lunch truck. Charles Phan tells the Wall Street Journal, the business would allow customers to observe the food.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #23
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    On the WSJ now

    Time to grab one of those Real Kung Fu t-shirts with Bruce on it. Because if I was Shannon, I'd be working at shutting their copyright infringing asses down pronto.
    * October 23, 2009, 4:25 AM ET
    Real Kung Fu, But Not Real Bruce Lee

    Todayís WSJ looks at efforts by Bruce Leeís family to turn the martial arts star into a global brand on par with Elvis Presley and James Dean, more than 26 years after his death. Mr. Leeís daughter, Shannon, has set up licensing and production companies and consulted with the estates of other celebrities for advice on how to keep a deceased icon alive.

    But while Mr. Leeís image has been officially licensed for use by a range of companies, from jeansmaker Lucky to Nokia (which used it to promote a mobile phone with this inventive commercial),there are plenty of unlicensed image floating around on T-shirts, posters and other memorabilia.

    In China, a domestic fast-food chain known as Real Kung Fu (真功夫, zhen gongfu in Mandarin) may not use a literal image of Bruce Lee as part of itís brand, but itís hard not to associate the company with the legendary martial artist.

    The chain, based in the south China city of Guangzhou, uses as its logo an image of dark haired man in a kung fu pose, wearing a yellow top that looks a lot like the famous yellow track suit worn by Mr. Lee in the posthumously-released Game of Death. Many of the chainís 300-plus restaurants across China feature large, black and white murals of a man who bears a strong, albeit blurry, resemblance to Mr. Lee.

    A spokeswoman for Zhen Gongfu said the company did not engage in discussions with Mr. Leeís family before using the images and added that they are not meant to represent Bruce Lee.

    In that case, it seems we have a shanzhai Bruce Lee on our hands, and just because itís Real Kung-Fu doesnít mean itís real Bruce Lee

    The food is perhaps a bit more authentic (by fast food standards) with a Cantonese twist. On the menu: steamed chicken and mushrooms, egg custard with preserved pork and fish ball noodle soup.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #24
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    I really want one of you NYCers to try this place...

    ....in fact, if one of you posts a review on this thread and then IMs me your address, I'll send you something cool like an ugly Bruce Lee patch or a headband or something.
    In Which We Finally Try Kung Fu Bing
    By Sarah DiGregorio in DiGregorio, Featured
    Monday, Nov. 2 2009 @ 12:01PM

    ​When Fork in the Road first walked by the still-under-construction Kung Fu Bing, it aroused our curiosity. What's a bing? (It's the Mandarin word for "pancake.") What's a kung fu bing? (A bing with so much MSG that you might completely tweak out after eating it.) And why the attack panda, brandishing chopsticks? We still don't know the answer to that.

    After the place opened, Joe DiStefano went and checked it out for Serious Eats, and reported back that it was greasy, gave him an MSG hangover, and was just generally wrong. But he had chosen the sausage and cheese filling, and that, surely, was his mistake. The bing is a greasy, flaky flatbread, much like a paratha or a roti canai. Filling it with more grease is too much. So we went and blithely ordered a bing filled with an egg, plus the standard lettuce and tomato.

    In front of the griddle is a large window that looks out onto the street. An old man pressed his nose up onto the glass and stared at the Kung Fu Bing counterwoman for a good 10 minutes, as though she were a zoo exhibit. It wasn't a terribly interesting show: The woman forked up a round of dough from a container, and put it on the the large griddle. She took an unmarked spice shaker and shook out a bunch of some sort of seasoning onto the bread. The she cracked an egg and dispensed a large amount of the seasoning onto that as well. After a while, the bread puffed up and became golden. She put the egg in the pancake, folded it up with lettuce and tomato, and added several more vigorous shakes of the seasoning.

    The egg kung fu bing is not actually very substantial, and at $3 it borders on overpriced. Still, it was reasonably tasty--the bread stretchy, light, and oily, although there's no sign of the scallion that's reportedly supposed to be in there. The seasoning imparted a deep, meaty, hard-to-pin-down flavor that must have been pure MSG. Now, we love MSG. It makes things taste good. But ingesting about a tablespoon of pure MSG? That is not something you want to do. Heart racing, extremities tingling, we scurried back to the Voice offices.

    Kung Fu Bing strikes again! And apparently, there are plans for the panda to spread around town. Eeek!

    79 Division Street
    212-226-2838
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #25
    for the panda alone... I am so gonna check it out
    Chan Tai San Book at https://www.createspace.com/4891253

    Quote Originally Posted by taai gihk yahn View Post
    well, like LKFMDC - he's a genuine Kung Fu Heroô
    Quote Originally Posted by Taixuquan99 View Post
    As much as I get annoyed when it gets derailed by the array of strange angry people that hover around him like moths, his good posts are some of my favorites.
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    I think he goes into a cave to meditate and recharge his chi...and bite the heads off of bats, of course....

  11. #26
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    Awesome!

    We look forward to your review.

    I'm thinking a kamikaze headband would look mighty fine on you, lkfmdc.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #27
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    Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi? WTF?

    Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi is a lot like Ninja Restaurant and Dim Sum...
    So if you're ever in Miami....
    Hell's Kitchen Alum Joshua Wahler Now Executive Chef of Kung Fu Kitchen at Catalina
    By Jackie Sayet in Restaurant News

    ​Being shown the door by Gordon Ramsay is like facing the martial arts whoopass of Jackie Chan in Brett Ratner's Rush Hour series, only a bit more brutal.

    Josh Wahler, a former contestant of Hell's Kitchen 3 (quite possibly its best season on record,) survived one such exit rather elegantly, and has now samboed his way from Doral's 5300 Chop House into the role of executive chef of Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi at The Catalina Hotel and Beach Club. New breakfast, lunch and dinner menus will launch in three weeks.

    "I left my last employer at the end of August because I was looking for a new challenge leading up to the season," says Wahler. "This amazing opportunity presented itself with open arms. There is a single unified vision for this restaurant between our ownership and management.

    We are going to shake up the South Beach culinary community with our new and innovative menu, experienced front of house management and extraordinary atmosphere that will make Kung Fu a destination restaurant."

    Sounds like strict corporate messaging to us, but hopefully Wahler will flex culinary creativity worthy of the restaurant's name. Stay tuned, folks.

    Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi
    (305) 674-1160
    1732-1756 Collins Avenue
    Miami Beach
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #28
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    Another restaurant to review

    Now this place sounds freaking great... just like those ninja restaurants.
    Making a name in kungfu kitsch
    (China Daily)
    Updated: 2009-12-04 11:42

    Making a name in kungfu kitsch

    Down a small, dusty side street next to a couple of convenience stores and several new highrise apartment buildings in Haidian district sits a bamboo shack that appears anachronistically out of place.

    It is meant to look that way.

    The shabby structure is home to Feng Bo Zhuang, a kungfu-themed eatery intended to take diners on a martial arts-infused food journey back to a half-fantasized Chinese past filled with evil monks, heroic swordsmen and fair-skinned maidens.

    The restaurant's concept takes inspiration from famous martial arts author Louis Cha, known to his readers by his pen name Jin Yong. Virtually a literary movement, more genre than author, Cha's novels of chivalry and romance have captured the imagination of millions of Chinese for more than half a century.

    Since Feng Bo Zhuang was established in Hefei province in 2000, the restaurant has expanded exponentially across China. There are now 500 locations, 10 of which are in Beijing. The first overseas branch opened in Singapore last year.

    All have a similar ambience. Light wooden walls are lined with ample kungfu kitsch: various swords and fighting sticks mixed with calligraphic banners and warrior-filled paintings.

    Guests are expected to bang on a large, red drum to announce their arrival after which the wait staff, decked out in appropriate marshal arts garb, greet clientele as "swordsmen" and "swordswomen" and guide them to modest tables surrounded by low, and not exactly comfortable, wooden benches.

    From there, the experience slides back further into China's past. There are no menus. Instead, staff take it upon themselves to decide for the table what humble grub best suits the palates of kungfu masters who have entered from fighting modern-day battles on Beijing's busy streets.

    Making a name in kungfu kitsch

    For four people, a spread of six dishes served on replicated ancient warrior pottery from Anhui province is usually selected. Rice-covered chunks of meat and egg, also known as "big power meatballs", are always included in the mix.

    Other popular selections include fried prawns, bean curd with chicken soup and a spicy fish soup with peanuts and broiled greens. The average price of a dish is around 25 yuan. For those looking to splurge, a platter of roasted donkey meat is available for 75 yuan.

    These can all be washed down with a silver flask filled with the restaurant's strong brew of homemade wine.

    If any of the platters fail to suit the palates of guests, staff will eagerly replace them with another Chinese culinary creation at no extra charge (unwanted food is bizarrely disposed of in a trash can in front of guests).

    Feng Bo Zhuang is frequented mostly by Chinese looking to relive at least a small piece of the kungfu fantasies that filled their childhood imaginations as well as recall a vast period of Chinese history that subtly floats underneath the country's rapidly modernizing reality today.

    A few foreigners come as well. However, for them, the experience may not be as endearing as it is for those longing to taste memories that transcend lifetimes, generations and entire chapters in time that make up the cultural lifeblood of the country itself.

    Meng Jing contributed to the story

    Add: No 75 Baofusi Road, Haidian district

    Tel: 62652729
    "big power meatballs" yea, there are some forum members here that could use a serving of those...
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Now this place sounds freaking great... just like those ninja restaurants.
    ...worth it for the roasted donkey platter alone!
    "The true meaning of a given movement in a form is not its application, but rather the unlimited potential of the mind to provide muscular and skeletal support for that movement." Gregory Fong

  15. #30
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    There is one on 86th St in Brooklyn, N.Y.

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