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Thread: Kung Fu Restaurants & Bars

  1. #31
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    hey Sam, we both know, the only REAL Kung-Fu restaurant was the "Bamboo Forest" in Chinatown...
    "My Gung-Fu may not be Your Gung-Fu.
    Gwok-Si, Gwok-Faht"

    "I will not be part of the generation
    that killed Kung-Fu."

    ....step.

  2. #32
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    Kfk

    Just in case you're in FL and don't have plans for NYE yet....
    Catalina Hotel and Kung Fu Kitchen Host Chef's Club and New Year's Eve
    By Jacob Katel in Coming Attractions, Food Industry
    Tue., Dec. 29 2009 @ 11:30AM

    ​There were no kicks fast as lightning, it wasn't frightening, and the staff showed expert timing when the Catalina Hotel's Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi recently hosted South Florida's Chef's Club on their South Beach rooftop lounge.

    Chef Josh Wahler, of Hell's Kitchen fame, and Nobu South Beach and Los Angeles pedigree, is the new chef in charge at the Kung Fu.

    He says, "Besides being a Jewish kid from northern Jersey, Asian food is what I do. I had a pair of chopsticks in my hand as soon as I could hold them."

    Chef Wahler prepared a variety of party snacks for his guest including sushi rolls, a salmon tartare and fried gyoza take on chips and dip, and fried pork dumplings.

    The Catalina Hotel is hosting a Spam Allstars New Year's Eve. A $95 all access pass gets you entry to three buildings, the Spam Allstars performing live, DJ's spinning, a "lavish super buffet" from 8 p.m. to midnight, open bar, champagne toast and breakfast buffet.

    Here are some more pics from the Chef's Club dinner.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  3. #33
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    I don't know about a kung fu restaurant, but how about a teahouse in Hangzhou?

  4. #34
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    Not quite a restaurant - a SALOON!

    Kung Fu Saloon in Austin, TX, no less.

    Monday, January 25, 2010, 12:30pm CST
    Kung Fu Saloon, Haiti fundraising that's fun
    Austin Business Journal

    West 6th Street entertainment venue Kung Fu Saloon will donate 25 cents to Haiti for every game played between Jan. 22 and Feb. 1, officials said recently.

    The bar at 510 Rio Grande St. operates 19 vintage arcade games that cost a quarter per play. For the rest of the month, 100 percent of game proceeds will benefit the American Red Cross, which is leading several earthquake relief initiatives in Haiti.

    “This is the least we can do to help those that have been affected by this unimaginable tragedy in Haiti,” Kung Fu co-owner Nick Adams said.

    Kung Fu is also collecting new or used shoes that will be donated to Karavel Shoes and passed to Haiti earthquake survivors.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Kung Fu Kitchen and Sushi is a lot like Ninja Restaurant and Dim Sum...
    So if you're ever in Miami....
    well to be fair ~G, even with your great publication, and numerous others and the consternation of many a martial artist, many north american people can still not recognize the difference between various asian cultural practices, language, arts etc.

    It's all a hodge podge of asian people.

    I've been in kungfu schools that have japanese stuff everywhere! Look at SD for instance, if that isn't an asian dogs breakfast, then I don't know what is.

    No offense SD-ers, just pointing it out and adding that you guys aren't the only ones who consistently make this gaff. There are plenty who mix and match as they see fit, make up characters and all sort of other outright falseness.

    Who knows why. I think there is more revealed about the warped nature of humanity everyday. Especially when it comes to cooptation!
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  6. #36
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    You forget, I'm Californian, David

    We love fusion cuisine here in CA. Potstickers with nacho sauce? Yum.

    I just like to point out the distinctions. It makes me look more knowledgeable.

    Meanwhile Real Kungfu seems to be doing well.

    China, HK stocks gain in cautious session

    HyComm Wireless Ltd (0499.HK) surged 18.54 percent, after it said it was in preliminary discussions with Stanley Choi and Cai Dabiao, founder of China's "Real Kungfu" Chinese fast food chain, regarding the proposed formation of a consortium for acquiring Fu Ji Food and Catering Services (1175.HK).
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    We love fusion cuisine here in CA. Potstickers with nacho sauce? Yum.

    I just like to point out the distinctions. It makes me look more knowledgeable.

    Meanwhile Real Kungfu seems to be doing well.
    Do you have SUSHI LOCO out there?
    "Combining The Asian Art Of Sushi With The Flavors Of The Southwest"

    http://www.sushiloco.com/

  8. #38
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    potstickers with nacho cheese?

    mmm, I've never tried that and probably am not that quick to want to, but if it was presented in front of me, I would try it.

    still, I prefer the red wine vinegar with those.

    as for distinctions, we had a guy training with us for about a year and who couldn't/wouldn't stop calling practice "karate class" lol.

    poor guy.

    anyway, as a martial artist, but not a career martial artist, I pretty much avoid conversations about it in mixed company these days. If someone isn't already into kungfu, they're not gonna get much reference to it or find much about it on my facebook page or that sort of thing.

    I was running out of the kind of sighs that you let out when the 9000th person asks "kungfu? what's that?" or "seafood? that's a funny name for a teacher" or better when they get all racist, squint and brandish their front teeth and make some comment about my brack bert while calling me charie chan #1 son!

    But I digress...
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  9. #39
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    Bumping this in support of hot meals at fair prices.

    Actually, Real Kungfu is almost pricier than McDonalds. When you are living on China wages, these places are occasional treats. For tourists, however, I would really recommend Real Kungfu. Delicious hot Chinese food in a clean location. If you've never been to China you'll understand when you arrive why this is such a breakthrough. AND it's cool eat with Bruce Lee images all around you.

    Thankfully for me, there are a host of copycat places that have sprung up that do the same for cheaper. Ate at a place today that offered meals the same sort of cool bowls as Real Kungfu and was exceptionally clean: a main dish of mushroom and chicken, a side of vegetables, soup and rice all for 16 yuan.

    I think Real Kungfu could be a hit in America, as long as the prices were comparable to McDonalds.

  10. #40
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    Not qutie a restaurant

    Although this guy must have a restaurant somewhere in Toronto.
    Tai chi master takes on the Dragons
    KAREN McKINLEY
    03/01/2010

    Local tai chi master Peng You doesn‘t wield a sword when faced with a den of dragons – he flashes a business plan.

    You appeared for a taping of CBC‘s Dragon‘s Den in the hopes of getting a panel of business magnates to invest in his idea, The Tai Chi Chef.

    Guests are invited to pitch business ideas to a group of five Canadian investors. If the panel likes their ideas, they invest money to get the ideas off the ground and into the market.

    “I had seen the show before, but wasn‘t sure if I wanted to take my idea to them,” You said at his tai chi studio in Thunder Bay. “Last year there was a lady at the Intercity mall that took my information and idea back to the CBC. I received a call two weeks later letting me know my idea had been selected for taping.”

    His was one of 300 chosen from thousands of sales pitches across Canada.

    You, a tai chi practitioner and former restaurant owner, said he has always wanted to combine the two because combining food and exercise is only logical. His idea involves hosting parties at homes and offices where he teaches a few basic tai chi moves, then prepares a Chinese meal. It can be modified to suit all diets, levels of fitness and locations, he said.

    “The best part is there‘s nothing like it anywhere else in Canada,” You said. “Which is why the Dragons were interested in my idea. It‘s unique.”

    The episode was taped in Toronto and is to air on Wednesday.

    You said the taping was stressful. Getting the Dragons to listen to his idea and having to make his pitch in front of the cameras was a lot of work, but he added that he was excited to show his plan. He even taught the Dragons some tai chi moves during his pitch.

    He cannot divulge if he received funding due to contractual obligations.

    “You need to be really prepared when walking onto the set, I had to have everything for them to see.” he said.

    Before You left the studio, he invited the Dragons to Thunder Bay to film an episode here.

    “I told them we have so many great ideas in the city, they really should look into investing here,” he said.

    Like many excited businessmen, he has grander plans for his Tai Chi Chef idea. Eventually, he would like to have a combined restaurant and studio, where he could host banquets and parties. He also mused about having the Tai Chi Chef branded, to start franchises across the country.

    Photos and details about his pitch to the Dragons are available at www.cbc.ca/dragonsden.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  11. #41
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    Kung Fu Plaza Restaurant in Las Vegas

    A Precursor to Peking Duck Found in Las Vegas -- Authentic Chinese And Thai Restaurant Features Lessor Known Dishes

    There are only small number of customers who venture away from the most commonly ordered Asian dishes at Kung Fu Plaza Restaurant in Las Vegas, and most of those patrons are visiting from Asia.

    Las Vegas, NV (Vocus/PRWEB ) March 10, 2010 -- One such receipt that most Americans would consider “off the beaten path” is Kung Fu Plaza Roast Duck. While most citizens are already familiar with Peking Duck, a famous duck dish that originated in Beijing during the imperial era, there is another recipe served daily that has humbler and more ancient origins.

    “The Kung Fu Plaza Roast Duck recipe comes from a small valley in China, where the people still speak Teochew (Chaozhou hua in Mandarin),” said Allen Wong, general manger of Las Vegas Chinese Food. “Even some of their language retains archaic promotions that have been lost to modern dialects. The cuisine, Chiuchow or Teochew as it is called, relies much less on heavy seasoning and more on the quality of the ingredients, which is why we only purchase Maple Leaf Farm Premium duck.”

    According to Wong, while Teochew people later migrated from southern Fujian in China, they settled from areas that were geographically isolated and remote. Many of the Teochew ancestry can be traced back to the Taihang Mountain range of north-central china, he said.

    “It’s significant because just like not all Asian people are the same, neither are all Chinese people,” said Wong. “The culture is as rich and diverse as the United States and the cuisine is a varied as you might expect traveling from Boston to Biloxi and Santa Fe to San Francisco.”

    Attempting to appeal to authentic preference of Asian visitors in Las Vegas, Kung Fu Plaza maintains a menu that includes almost 800 dishes, predominantly from China and Thailand. The menu selection, Wong says, represents one of the most expansive Chinese Food and Thai Food menus in the region.

    To review a complete menu, visit http://www.kungfuplaza.com. Kung Fu Plaza delivers within a three-mile radius and is located at 3505 S. Valley View Boulevard, which is just east of the Fashion Show Mall on the Las Vegas Strip. For reservations, call 702-247-4120.

    Founded in 1973, Kung Fu Plaza is the oldest and most authentic Chinese and Thai restaurant in Las Vegas. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. The average entree is under $10 and most patrons order family style.
    So here's the deal. If any of you want to review a kung fu styled restaurant for our e-zine, email me at Gene@KungFuMagazine.com. I'm not going to compensate you for that, but you could wheedle a free meal from it. You'd just have to hustle it with the manager, get some pics and deliver a decent restaurant review. Let me know what you're doing and I'll back you up if the manager runs a check on your authenticity. I'm just putting that out there because I know some of you members could probably use a good meal.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  12. #42
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    Again, Las Vegas

    More on Kung Fu Plaza.
    All Press Releases for May 7, 2010
    Healthier Diets Begin at School, Says Thai Restaurant Owner
    One Restaurant Owner’s Thoughts On Obama’s Healthier Foods Campaign

    Las Vegas, NV (Vocus/PRWEB ) May 7, 2010 -- Allen Wong, general manger of Kung Fu Plaza, a Thai Restaurant in Las Vegas, has taken a real interest in first lady Michelle Obama’s national campaign to fight childhood obesity. While most of the campaign is geared toward mobilizing public- and private-sector resources to coordinate public information, Wong believes any healthy food campaign ought to occur in the public school system.

    Student meals are often high in fat, additives, and preservatives
    So far, the only defense various school districts have offered up is that brown bag lunches tend to be less healthy. I don’t understand when less adequate became an acceptable replacement for less than adequate. Make better meals at school and kids won’t pack brown bag lunches.
    Thai food is the healthiest cuisine on the planet. The ingredients have numerous health benefits, including anti-oxidants and immune-system boosters
    I became more aware of the Clark County School District lunch program after a friend of mine mentioned that his child’s school rewards children with candy and other sweets
    When I asked him what they had for lunch, he said the menu read like a fast food restaurant.
    “Student meals are often high in fat, additives, and preservatives,” said Wong. “So far, the only defense various school districts have offered up is that brown bag lunches tend to be less healthy. I don’t understand when less adequate became an acceptable replacement for less than adequate. Make better meals at school and kids won’t pack brown bag lunches.”

    As a point of comparison, Wong cites a Feb. 2008 article in Edutopia that compared school lunches in the United States, Russia, and Japan (http://www.edutopia.org/lunch-around-the-world). Americans are eating turkey dogs and tater tots. Russians are eating beef, beet soup, and rye bread. And Japanese students are eating wonton miso soup, spinach and Chinese cabbage, rice, and milk.

    “Thai food is the healthiest cuisine on the planet. The ingredients have numerous health benefits, including anti-oxidants and immune-system boosters,” said Wong. “Why aren’t more programs developing affordable menus that bring the best of the world’s foods into cafeterias instead of the worst?”

    Wong said that while he has an affinity for Thai food, the solution doesn’t have to be Thai cuisine. The National Farm to School Network program is one step in the right direction, even if Wong’s home state is one of only two states that has not made any progress to improve school lunches. The national program is committed to delivering farm fresh foods as opposed to relying on caterers. Forty-three states have operational programs and five more are committed to them.

    “I became more aware of the Clark County School District lunch program after a friend of mine mentioned that his child’s school rewards children with candy and other sweets,” said Wong. “When I asked him what they had for lunch, he said the menu read like a fast food restaurant.”

    Wong says he made a joke about how his friend’s children ought to be eating Thai food. Rather than laugh it off, his friend said such a change would be welcomed, adding that Obama’s national campaign to fight childhood obesity should begin by fixing what the government serves children for lunch.

    To review a menu consisting of more than 800 Chinese and Thai dishes, visit http://www.kungfuplaza.com. Kung Fu Plaza delivers within a three-mile radius and is located at 3505 S. Valley View Blvd., which is just west of the Fashion Show Mall on the Las Vegas Strip. For reservations, call 702-247-4120.

    Founded in 1973, Kung Fu Plaza is the oldest and most authentic Chinese and Thai restaurant in Las Vegas. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. The average entree is under $10 and most patrons order family style.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    More on Kung Fu Plaza.
    I like that place. I ate there for my high school graduation.
    Although the changes are infinite, the principles are the same.
    - Wang Tsung Yueh

    To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill.
    - Sun Tzu

    Boards don't hit back.
    - Bruce Lee

  14. #44
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    Two today

    Here's number one Kung Fu Plaza (should be Muay Thai Plaza if it's Thai, but after Karate Kid, all bets are off )

    Large Menu Underpins Thai Restaurant’s Success
    Authentic Thai Restaurant Helps Educate Customers About The Cuisine

    Las Vegas, NV (Vocus) July 15, 2010

    When Americans visit Kung Fu Plaza, a Las Vegas Restaurants that has been serving the oldest and most authentic Chinese food and Thai food in the valley since 1974, it is not uncommon for them to browse some 800 dishes and ask if there is a difference between Thai food and Chinese food. The question always makes Allen Wong, general manger of Kung Fu Plaza, smile.

    “Everything is different between Thai food and Chinese food,” Wong says. “Many Thai dishes cannot even be cooked properly at home because they require temperatures of 400 degrees for the ingredients, vegetables, and meats to bond properly, which most conventional stovetop burners cannot reach. I know, I’ve tried myself.”

    Wong should know. His parents immigrated to the United States from Thailand in the 1960s, opening one of the first Thai restaurants in the United States. The concept was so different then that his parents named the restaurant Kung Fu to help distinguish it from Chinese restaurants.

    “Most people assume the difference is the spice, but that is not really true,” says Wong. “Thai cooking was influenced by India, China, Persia, and other countries across Southeast Asia. That is the charm about our food; it blends all of these influences to make something very new and unique.”

    Like American cuisine, Thai cuisine is also divided into regional cooking, with the central region consisting of the most dishes familiar to Americans. Rice, fish, vegetables with garlic, black pepper, and fish sauce-nam pla are common. The introduction of fiery-hot chili peppers was not introduced until the 1500s, along with coriander, lime, and tomato imported from the West. All of these ingredients were used to create increasingly complex blends.

    The most common staple is sweet jasmine rice, which is indigenous to Thailand. Most authentic Thai meals consist of rice khao with complementary dishes served concurrently. “Gang pad” and “Gang juud” refer to curried dishes and soups whereas “Yum” refers to Thai style salads.

    Alongside traditional dishes such as Tom-Yum Koong, Pad Thai, Pa-nang and Laarb, Kung Food Plaza serves an abundance of Chinese dishes. Originally, they were incorporated at the request of customers looking for popular Chinese dishes in the 1970s. Since, Kung Fu Plaza has added dozens of lesser known recipes.

    “We use curries from several regions to create unique dishes, including Pa-nang and a spicy Thai Green curry,” says Wong. “We also serve Laarb, which is a rural classic, and have created our own Smoked Pork Salad.

    Kung Fu Plaza maintains a menu that includes almost 800 dishes, predominantly from China and Thailand. The menu selection represents one of the most expansive Chinese and Thai menus in the region. To review a complete menu, visit http://www.kungfuplaza.com/home.html.

    Founded in 1974, Kung Fu Plaza is the oldest and most authentic Las Vegas Restaurants serving Chinese food and Thai food. It is open daily from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. The average entree is under $10 and most patrons order family style. For more information about Kung Fu Plaza Restaurant visit http://www.adventuresinkungfu.com, or call 702-247-4120.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  15. #45
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    #2

    First Kung Fu Thai, next Kung Fu Sushi...
    Posted on Thursday, 07.15.10
    A FORK ON THE ROAD
    Life is a cabaret at Kung Fu & Sushi

    BY LINDA BLADHOLM
    lbb75@bellsouth.net

    Nathan Lieberman has gone from snow bird to Peking duck. The restaurateur who spent winters in South Florida as a kid now offers the classic duck dish at Kung Fu Kitchen & Sushi on the beach. The menu combines Chinese favorites, maki rolls and a smattering of Southeast Asian dishes.

    The eclectic space in the Catalina hotel lobby has an onyx sushi bar that lights up, magenta ceilings hung with black glass chandeliers and a mural of a samurai sporting headphones. A DJ spins most nights. On Saturday nights there's an interactive burlesque show based on Forbidden City, a '30s club in San Francisco, creating a three-ring circus of fun, food and music.

    Lieberman, 31, a native of Philadelphia, grew up in an eccentric Russian-Romanian-American family, and studied real estate finance and film at NYU while working in restaurants. After graduating, he moved to Miami, where his parents had ``retired'' and worked in construction and promoted club events.

    Six years ago his dad, Alan Lieberman, bought the Catalina and renovated it himself. Dad designed and built the interior; Nathan hired several sushi chefs and Chef Oa to run the Chinese kitchen.

    Starters include chunks of miso-glazed sea bass, octopus salad with avocado and kimchi, and Vietnamese rice papers rolled up in tofu, lettuce and bean sprouts with peanut dipping sauce. General Tsao chicken (stir-fried bits of bird, bell peppers and whole dried red chiles in a sweet spicy sauce) or pepper steak strips tossed with asparagus can be shared by two with shrimp crackers and cubes of fried tofu.

    The deep-fried snapper looks whole, but it is filleted skin wrapped around bite-size bits of fish under a top hat of crispy potato ``noodles'' doused in ginger-honey sauce. Tangy pad Thai has shrimp, veggies, omelet strips and peanuts.

    The signature roll is the Kung Fu crunch with cream cheese, crabstick and spicy tuna topped with tempura flakes and eel sauce. Scallop dynamite is a house special with chopped bivalves rolled up inside out with red tobiko and spicy mayo. There's also sushi rolled in cucumber instead of rice.

    The sushi counter hops until the wee hours with combos from Iron Monkey to Godzilla served with sake bombs.

    Vanilla ice cream with lychees makes for a cool ending in this funky-hip spot.

    Linda Bladholm's latest book is ``Latin and Caribbean Grocery Stores Demystified.''

    Place: Kung Fu Kitchen & Sushi.

    Address: 1720 Collins Ave., Miami Beach.

    Contact: 305-534-7905.

    Hours: 5 p.m.-midnight Sunday-Thursday and until 5 a.m. weekends.

    Prices: Appetizers $7-$11, entrees $13-$24, sides $5, rolls $5-$18, sushi pieces $3-$5.

    FYI: The Forbidden City dinner show starts at 10 p.m. Saturdays (no cover charge).
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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