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Thread: Kung Fu Restaurants & Bars

  1. #61
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    麦当劳

    McDonald's seeking a new menu for mainland success
    Updated: 2011-08-31 07:50
    By Gao Changxin (China Daily)

    Customers at a McDonald's Corp outlet in Changzhou, Jiangsu province. The restaurant chain is adapting its strategy in China to accommodate changing conditions in the industry. Wang Qiming / for China Daily

    SHANGHAI - McDonald's Corp, the world's biggest fast-food chain, is tweaking its strategy in China to take account of changing industry conditions.

    The new efforts include loosening its ownership structure to expand the number of stores and renovating current stores to provide a better customer experience.

    Last week, McDonald's expanded its trial franchise program to include Kunming North Star Enterprise Co. The move allows the local catering company to take over the 11 existing stores in Yunnan and open new ones throughout the province.

    "We are walking our way through this franchise program, we will continue looking for franchise partners in China," Kenneth Chan, chief executive officer of McDonald's (China) Co Ltd, said on Tuesday.

    McDonald's relies heavily on franchises in developed markets including the United States, but in China almost all its stores are self-operated.

    The trial program was launched in China six years ago. But before last week it had only three franchisees running six restaurants. Expanding the program is expected to help it accelerate a plan to expand its China network to more than 2,000 outlets by 2013.

    Adding more stores will help the US-based company to put more resources into China, where competition in the fast-food market has intensified two decades after the golden arches first made an appearance.

    At present, the top spot is held by rival Kentucky Fried Chicken, owned by Yum! Brands Inc, which has about 3,200 locations. McDonald's has about 1,300.

    More players are coming in, giving consumers more choices and threatening to cut into McDonald's market share.

    The Chinese fast-food chain Kungfu Catering Management Co Ltd has more than 300 Zhen Kungfu restaurants, while Taiwan's Ting Hsin Group operates more than 1,000 Dicos fried-chicken stores.

    Other chains, including California Pizza Kitchen Inc and German upscale seafood chain Nordsee GmbH, also plan to enter the market.

    To foster customer loyalty, McDonald's is renovating existing stores and remodeling its traditional yellow-and-red decor into a more relaxed and stylish bistro design.

    By creating a better dining environment, McDonald's hopes costumers will visit more often, and not just for the food.

    The latest renovated store reopened on Tuesday in the upscale CITIC Square in downtown Shanghai. The new store features free WiFi, cozier seats, selected music and outdoor seating.

    By 2014, about 70 percent of McDonald's stores in China will have a similar look.

    The renovation, said Chan, will help McDonald's stay "one step ahead of the game" and be "different from other brands" in China.
    Has anyone eaten at a Zhen Kungfu joint? I'll give a free subscription to the first person who gets a review here with a photo in front of one in a got qi? shirt.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Has anyone eaten at a Zhen Kungfu joint? I'll give a free subscription to the first person who gets a review here with a photo in front of one in a got qi? shirt.
    Next time I'm in China... but that will probably be a year or more from now.
    Simon McNeil
    ___________________________________________

    Be on the lookout for the Black Trillium, a post-apocalyptic wuxia novel released by Brain Lag Publishing available in all major online booksellers now.
    Visit me at Simon McNeil - the Blog for thoughts on books and stuff.

  3. #63
    naming or branding.

    me think it is not necessary.

    pay more attention to food.

    macdonald is heralding healthy diet in the fast food industry in US and the world over.

    hong kong disney is serving cantonese dim sum and better chinese food to cater local cantonese visitors.

    disney and macdonald are brands.

    no need to change its image/brand or wearing kung fu or wushu outfit.

    fast ordering and delivery/service of quality and healthy food means more.

    --


  4. #64
    wi fi is always good.


  5. #65
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    Kung Fu Saloon

    A bar, not a restaurant. Now that's what I'm talking about.

    Kung Fu Hustle
    Video games are only part of this Washington corridor adult arcade's appeal.
    By Shea Serrano Wednesday, Oct 12 2011

    The apple cider sake bombs at Kung Fu Saloon (5317 Washington) are far more useful than Jonathon Cidersake, or whoever it was that invented them, could have reasonably anticipated.

    Kung Fu Saloon
    5317 Washington
    Houston, TX 77007

    Category: Bars/Clubs
    Region: Heights

    They can cure ugliness, known as the "Apple Cider Sake Bomb Pretty, Pretty Princess Phenomenon." They can make you think you're exceptionally tough, as per the "ACSB Law of Conservation of Getting Your Ass Kicked." Shoot, drink enough of them, and you might be able to experience the ultra-rare "ACSB Wait, Wait, Wait, I Punched a Cow Last Night?!" theory of relativity.

    And they can also, as Cindy Segovia will tell you, help dull the pain of losing a world-class visionary you never officially met.

    Segovia is a manager at an Apple store (computers, not fruit). For the past few weeks, she says, her customers have been telling her about Kung Fu Saloon, this sleek do-everything bar on Washington.

    When Segovia heard about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs's death last Wednesday, she and her wife, also an Apple store employee, decided to check Kung Fu out.

    "We really like this place," says Segovia, glancing around. She is sitting inside the venue that same Wednesday evening. It's the middle of an otherwise uneventful week, but the 100 or so smiling people wandering in and out of Kung Fu's patio area seem to agree with her, at least in spirit.

    "Parking is a little steep [average $10 for the area], but at least it feels safe, so it's worth it," Segovia continues. "Every drink is $5 and under. It's been a lot of fun."

    Kung Fu Saloon was basically built up from a dead lot five months ago, assembled to mimic the bar's Austin location. If you've been to the original, you will instantly recognize the new one.

    The doors are watched by large, handsome men with nice hair who are obliquely intimidating. They've garnered a reputation for not letting minorities, specifically Asians, enter without a hassle. Tonight, though, the crowd is generally young and professional, and appears to be a fair mix of races.

    Kung Fu's interior is open, clean and attractive. High ceilings, polished concrete floors, real wood accents, and a bushel of HD TVs and video games work in unison to hold your attention. The games are mostly retro or almost-retro machines like Big Buck Hunter.

    The saloon plays music, an impressive, mostly enjoyable blend of '90s hip-hop and classic-rock dinosaurs, but the tunes are supplemental. It may look like a dance club from outside, but people don't come here to dance – they come here to come here.

    Kung Fu wants to be a good, big, nice neighborhood bar rather than a high-profile nightclub, according to a manager who asked not to be directly quoted. That's a big reason why it's easy to enjoy yourself here. The bar is as attractive as almost any venue on the strip – the stand-alone king is still Hughes Hangar (2811 Washington) – but it has replaced glitz with Blitz 2000.

    The most obvious line to draw is to Midtown's Barcadia (2600 Travis #103), the only other true video-game bar in the city. But cathode-ray gameplay is the only likeness these two seem to share.

    Barcadia serves food, and Kung Fu only serves drinks. Kung Fu is prettier than Barcadia. Barcadia offers free games; Kung Fu only does so on Sundays. Both have crafted their own, distinctly different atmospheres.

    Whichever one you connect with is the one that's best. Like an Android and iPhone.

    "Tonight we came here to sort of get away from the sadness of Steve Jobs's death today," explains Segovia. "You work for this company and get to know and love the product and you see all the positive ways the products affect the customers and you really start to feel a connection to the company.

    "It's like losing a friend."
    _____________________

    LAST CALL

    First, Blitz 2000 is just about the best, most underappreciated football video game of all time. Forget Madden 2012 or whatever, bro. Video games are supposed to be fun. If we wanted to run the Power I six times in a row for three-yard gains at a time, we'd play real football. Give us a game where every play is for 60 yards and the players are 10 feet tall and allowed to break each other's legs after the whistle.

    Second, Kung Fu serves that drink that mixes liquor and pickle juice. It ain't pretty but it's effective. Try it.

    Third, it's a bummer that the games aren't always set to free play at Kung Fu, but they are in better condition for it. That seems like a fair enough trade-off, although no guy has ever looked cool approaching a female with a pocket full of quarters jangling around. Cool Hand Luke couldn't pull that **** off.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #66
    The bar fights will be EPIC.

  7. #67
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    Wonder what's in a Sammo Hung sammich?

    Chow Yun-Fat is a great name for a sammich.
    Local food truck serves Chinese fare at the Denver Rescue Mission
    Owners of The Sesame Seed give back to the community by handing out sandwiches at The Crossing

    Posted: 10/25/2011 04:12:51 AM MDT Updated: 10/26/2011 04:24:31 AM MDT Author: AStorvik

    On Saturday, Oct.15, a brand new, family-owned food truck served low-income men, women and children before they celebrated their big grand opening. The Sesame Seed made traditional Chinese sandwiches to give away to families and individuals at The Crossing, the Denver Rescue Mission’s transitional living facility.

    The Liu family from Austin, Texas is excited to bring its passion for cooking to Colorado. Prior to Monday’s grand opening, The Sesame Seed wanted to offer their delicious food to those who may not be able to purchase it otherwise.

    “God has blessed us abundantly over the years and our hearts feel burdened to give back to the community,” Grace Liu said. “We are thrilled that we have the opportunity to partner with Denver Rescue Mission.”

    The Sesame Seed truck’s mission is to provide customers with the most deliciously unique tasting lunch and dinner experience possible. The Liu’s have combined authentic Chinese cooking with the almighty American tradition of the sandwich. The Chinese sandwiches are named after the world’s top kung fu stars: Bruce Lee, Jackie Chan, Chow Yun-Fat, Sammo Hung and Jet Li.

    Each sandwich uses fresh baked Chinese flat bread. In Chinese, the bread is called sao bing.The sao bings have a flaky exterior topped with black and white sesame seeds. The Sesame Seed’s top chef, Mei, has taken lessons from sao bing specialists located in Taipei, Taiwan to ensure the authenticity and taste of each sandwich.

    Find out more about The Sesame Seed on their website: sesameseedtruck.com
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #68
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    Kung Fu Hoagies

    I'd totally try a vegan kung fu hoagie. If only I was in Philly. I hear it's always sunny there.
    Truck Stop: Kung Fu Hoagies

    Truck Stop, Philadelphia Daily News
    Food: Vegan Vietnamese, starring banh mi hoagies ($4-$5) and rice noodles ($5), both starring deliciously fake (soy protein) chicken, ham and beef, dressed in cilantro, homemade pickles, coconut and/or jalapeños.
    Find it: For now, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 33rd and Chestnut; Saturday-Sunday at Clark Park, 43rd and Baltimore.
    Look for: A hand-painted hotdog cart with a red umbrella and kung fu trimmings.
    Eat on: The grass, or standing by a tall table balanced on milk crates.
    Twitter: @kungfuhoagies.
    Call: 267-344-6259.
    Around for: Less than a week.
    Trust us: The faux beef, especially in coconut lemongrass sauce, is amazing. Not like beef. But definitely tasty.
    A close second: Faux sesame peanut chicken.
    Backstory: Pals Paul (Davis) and Steve (Renzi) worked together at Whole Foods, study kung fu with Phuoc Phan at Seven Mountains and are already doing a booming biz.
    Wait: Ten, maybe 15 minutes during the lunch rush.
    Money: Credit cards accepted.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #69
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    Kung Fu Bubble Tea

    Love that label. I'd drink this for that label alone, and I'm not a fan of bubble tea.

    Taste Test: Kung Fu Bubble Tea
    By Clarissa Wei Wed., May 16 2012 at 9:03 AM

    Fork in the Road headed to Kung Fu Tea in the East Village yesterday for a taste of their bubble milk tea ($3). Our verdict: compared to its East Village bubble tea counterparts, Kung Fu reigns superior.

    The shop is owned by Taiwanese management and unlike neighboring Taiwanese joints T-Kettle and Saint's Alp Tea House, it is strictly a bubble tea shop. No snacks or any other food offerings -- just boba.

    Though the drink was on the sweeter side, the milk tea was not watered down and the tapioca pearls were sufficiently chewy. The pearls also had a sweet aftertaste. And unlike T-Kettle, where the bubble tea is shaken by hand, Kung Fu has a automatic bubble tea shaker which gives the milk tea its consistent and creamy flavor.

    Kung Fu also has one of the most extensive bubble tea menus in the city and provides traditional Taiwanese offerings like mung bean, red bean, white gourd, herbal jelly, and longan red date. But for those who aren't into the traditional, the shop also has more familiar options such as their chai latte, Italian mocha, caramel macchiato, and chocolate coffee.

    Patrons can also customize their drinks to differing levels of sweetness.

    Kung Fu is the go-to place for a bubble tea fix. T-Kettle's tea is plain and Saint's Alp is only good for their hot milk tea.

    Although the quality at Kung Fu is admittedly not comparable to the bubble tea selections in Taiwan, it definitely is the best of its kind in the East Village.

    Cash only.

    Address:
    241 E 10th St
    (between 2nd Ave & 1st Ave)
    New York, NY 10003
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #70
    nowadays it is popular to drink the tea cold

    so some of the ingredients are not destroyed

    but I still prefer hot and thickened tea.

    there are many ways of drinking a certain type of tea

    talking about the kung fu or the arts of drinking your tea

    --

    but no bubbles or ice for me.


  11. #71
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    Dojo Dog

    Follow the link for more photos
    Dojo Dog: Where martial arts meet street food truck
    By Jackie Burrell
    Bay Area News Group
    Posted: 05/23/2012 05:00:34 AM PDT
    Updated: 05/23/2012 05:00:37 AM PDT


    Michael Koh, 19, left, a junior environmental economics major at the... ( D. ROSS CAMERON )

    The saga of the hot dogs began late one night.

    UC Berkeley junior Michael Koh and his friends had followed up their study session with a few beers and a quick jaunt to Berkeley's venerable Top Dog for some buns on the run. In fact, it was such a quick jaunt they rushed right past the condiments, completely forgetting that a frankfurter sans ketchup or mustard is a sadly naked dog. And being college students, they didn't have what you might call a well-stocked fridge.

    "We're all Asian," Koh says, "so all we had was a bottle of teriyaki."

    Turns out, a teriyaki-topped hot dog tastes pretty decent. The fusion experiments that followed -- katsu sauce, shredded nori, wasabi! -- tasted even better. And when Koh added some sly names to his creations, he had a hit on his hands.

    These days, every Cal kid can get their hands on a Shaolin Monk hot dog, a Wushu frank or a Ninjitsu, topped with flash-grilled cabbage, shredded nori and, in an homage to the condiment that started it all, teriyaki sauce.

    Other college students make ends meet by playing barista or washing dishes in the dining hall, but Koh, an environmental econ major, has gone entrepreneurial instead. His street food truck -- the bright blue Dojo Dog food cart -- opened shop just a few yards from Sproul Plaza in January.

    As for those hot dog monikers, they are a nod to the martial arts combat techniques Koh admires, even if he can't actually do them.

    "They never worked out for me," he says. "But we wrap (the hot dog) with the diet of a Shaolin Monk."

    That would be the low-carb, seaweed-wrapped option. The other hot dogs come on hoagie-style rolls.

    Koh may be the first undergrad to run his own food truck at Cal, but street food fever is taking over not only cities, but also college campuses from coast to coast. Schools in Southern California, Texas, Oregon and Washington have launched their own versions of Off the Grid street food fests, bringing fleets of food trucks on campus. A trio of students at Bowdoin College in Maine launched a food truck in February. And law students in Pennsylvania have begun holding workshops for anyone interested in starting a food truck business of their own.

    There's no doubt that street food trucks are hot, says Matt Cohen, founder of Off the Grid, which hosts food truck gatherings in Berkeley, San Mateo and San Francisco. But most people who run trucks these days are line cooks or chefs who decided to go solo, or caterers looking to branch out. In other words, professionals.

    "(But) the original nouveau food trucks were run by foodies," Cohen says. "They think, 'I'm going to start a restaurant!' "

    Koh was one of those. He had dreamed of opening a restaurant someday, he says, "But because of the capital investment, I had to basically start off a little bit humble. I looked into street food."

    Of course, it doesn't take a CPA to figure out that a food truck is significantly less expensive to launch than a bricks-and-mortar eatery. And if you take the secondhand food cart option, as Koh did, the costs drop even further, which makes it a viable option for an entrepreneurial foodie, especially one as intrepid as Koh.

    Koh was just 16 when he decided he wanted to "explore the world." And the fact that he didn't speak any English didn't stop him from packing up and moving from his parents' home in Taiwan to San Mateo, where he set up housekeeping in an apartment his father keeps here, and enrolled in high school. Nothing, he says, gets in the way of a dream.

    But even Cohen is impressed that an undergrad took the plunge and that Koh managed to score one of Berkeley's, much-coveted, four-year contracts -- Koh's runs through December 2015 -- and that he put the whole deal together, bureaucratic red tape and all, while studying for final exams.

    "That was a nightmare," Koh concedes.

    Koh had filed for the permit last summer, but hadn't bought the cart, finessed the menu or begun the protracted business of getting city, county and health department approval until he got the formal OK from the university. Which meant he had five weeks to do everything -- while cramming for exams.

    It probably helped, he says, that he didn't know what he was getting into, until he was up to his neck in it.

    So, would he do it again?

    "That's debatable," he says. "I'm enjoying it a lot, but I'd enjoy being a normal student, partying, going to Top Dog. There's definitely trade-offs, but it's made my life a lot more colorful."

    Meanwhile, his parents have no clue that their globe-trotting son owns his own business now. They just think he's been really busy.

    "My dream is they're going to come visit me for my graduation," he says. "I'll take them to the cart, and after they finish, I'll say, 'By the way, this is mine.' "

    Inside A Dojo Dog

    Asian fusion fare is hardly a novelty, but when the culinary areas being fused involve hot dogs, seaweed and martial arts combat techniques, it looks something like this:

    Ninjitsu: A Dojo Dog dog topped with shredded nori, flash-grilled cabbage, teriyaki sauce and Japanese mayonnaise, in a hoagie-style bun.

    Kendo: Bonito flakes, cabbage, soy paste and wasabi mayonnaise.

    Wushu: Pork sung, cabbage, katsu sauce and Japanese mayonnaise.

    Shaolin Monk: Lettuce, grilled cabbage and a miso glaze, wrapped in nori rather than a bun.

    Find Dojo Dog online: at www.facebook.com/DojoDog, follow them on Twitter @BerkeleyDojoDog, and seek them out in the real world at the corner of Bancroft Way and Telegraph Avenue in Berkeley from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays.
    Are the Shaolin monk dogs veg? Hmm, that would make a good koan.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #72
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    The mixture of chinese and japanese is rather disturbing, LOL !
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  13. #73
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    Now I know what I'm having for lunch.


  14. #74
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    Gay...flaming gay....
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  15. #75
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    at least i wasnt the only one thinking that
    For whoso comes amongst many shall one day find that no one man is by so far the mightiest of all.

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