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Thread: marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!?

  1. #181
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    sad that it's even a topical issue these days. talk about some entrenched ideas. so way less bad than alcohol it's not even a joke.
    "George never did wake up. And, even all that talking didn't make death any easier...at least not for us. Maybe, in the end, all you can really hope for is that your last thought is a nice one...even if it's just about the taste of a nice cold beer."

    "If you find the right balance between desperation and fear you can make people believe anything"

    "Is enlightenment even possible? Or, did I drive by it like a missed exit?"

    It's simpler than you think.

    I could be completely wrong"

  2. #182
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    truism, brother.

  3. #183
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    ancient documentation

    What we can learn from the Chinese medical cannabis system
    Classical literature reveals how ancient Asian cultures medicated
    By Trey Reckling, The FreshToast January 16, 2019


    One interesting note is that, unlike Western fascination with cannabis “buds” or flowers, the Chinese documented using all parts of the plant: seeds, stalks and roots. 1971yes / iStock / Getty Images Plus

    China is more than 5,000 years old with a legendary history of herbal pharmacology. It should be no surprise that Chinese medical marijuana is thriving.

    The truth is out there, as two fictional characters once reminded us. Researchers from Hong Kong Baptist University were in search of the truth as it related to the historical use of medical marijuana in traditional Chinese medicine. They published a review of classic medical literature from Chinese antiquity as recorded in more than 800 texts collected in a set called the Complete Ben Cao or the Compendium of Materia Medica.

    It is widely held to be the most complete and comprehensive resource regarding the practice of traditional Chinese medicine. They focused on the texts of five different dynasties in history, translating and cross referencing information about specific uses of cannabis.

    One interesting note is that, unlike Western fascination with cannabis “buds” or flowers, the Chinese documented using all parts of the plant: seeds, stalks and roots. It is hypothesized that, because China so valued its traditional hemp production, the plant continued to be bred and selected based on its fiber and seed food quality rather than resin production in its flowers.

    Hemp cultivars became the favored sons. That said, the psychotropic potential of the plant were well known, as evidenced by the quote, “excessive consumption causes one to see ghosts and run about frenetically.”

    The authors found other interesting historic snapshots:

    In the 6th century, author Tao Hongjing wrote, “adepts (believed to be Taoist monk alchemists) take cannabis flower (mabo) with ginseng and know of things that have not yet come.”

    In 1070, physicians would compound a cannabis seed wine to treat pain so severe that it caused the patient to be immobile.

    The first well documented use of cannabis was for pain relief 1127-1270 AD. The flower of the plant, called mahua, was combined with datura flower, a highly psychotropic plant. The mixture was known as “sagacious sleep powder” and caused a heavy, dazed sleep.

    Historic cannabis use has been documented among Silk Road from the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911 AD).
    Historic use of opium and some highly hallucinogenic alkaloid based plants is well documented in China. However, researchers found, “there is little evidence that cannabis was either abused or prohibited in China prior to the first documented seizures of imported cannabis products in Xinjiang in 1936.” In some regions, it was simply part of the everyday pharmacopeia for hundreds of years.

    Research like this brought to us from Hong Kong is a humbling reminder that as we seek more information about therapeutic uses of cannabis that we must look not only forward to future research.

    We must also seek to benefit from the ancients, those hard-working and passionate people who sought health centuries before we arrived on the scene. To not seek their consul would be an arrogance we cannot afford.
    THREADS
    marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!?
    2,700 year old ganja found in China
    Gene Ching
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  4. #184
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    Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight

    what

    Is

    HAPPENING?




    Carl’s Jr. is rolling out a CBD burger, but don’t get your hopes too high

    By Maura Judkis
    April 17 at 2:00 PM


    Carl’s Jr.

    If you live in Denver and you’re celebrating 420, the weed-smoker’s holiday, the burger chain Carl’s Jr. has just the thing for your inevitable munchies. The restaurant is debuting a CBD-infused burger, to be sold for $4.20, on Saturday, April 20 (4/20), at a single restaurant in Denver. The burger, which has been named Rocky Mountain High: CheeseBurger Delight, consists of two beef patties, topped with pickled jalapeños, pepper jack cheese, fries and CBD-infused Santa Fe Sauce. Carl’s Jr. is the first major fast-food chain to put CBD on its menu.

    But if you think you’re going to get blazed off a cheeseburger, bad news: CBD is a non-psychoactive compound in hemp. It does not contain tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the compound in marijuana that makes people feel high. Advocates say it promotes relaxation, diminishes stress and eases pain. In fact, some say that CBD can counteract some of the unpleasant effects of being high on THC — so if you show up to Carl’s Jr. stoned and anxious or paranoid, the burger could mellow out your high.

    CBD has been popping up in lattes, gummies, skin-care products and even pet food: It has become one of the biggest trends of the year and is only expected to grow. The CBD industry got a big boost after the passage of the farm bill earlier this year. When it’s derived from hemp and grown according to strict regulations, its use will be legal nationwide. (Cannabinoids that do not comply with these regulations will remain a Schedule 1 substance.) But for now, it’s a tricky area of the law, because the Food and Drug Administration still hasn’t decided how to regulate CBD products.

    April 20 has become a major branding opportunity for food companies. Even such mainstream brands as Burger King, Denny’s and Chipotle use the opportunity to connect with their customers through cheeky social media posts using stoner lingo. But professionals in the cannabis industry don’t love the pile-on from junk-food brands, which they say promotes negative stereotypes about the lifestyle.

    Though the burger will be available only on Saturday at the Carl’s Jr. restaurant at 4050 Colorado Blvd. in Denver, availability could eventually expand. A company executive told Business Insider that if the test goes well, Carl’s Jr. would consider, ahem, rolling it out across America, though it could face challenges with state regulations.

    Given how much publicity the burger is getting, there’s a good chance that demand on Saturday will be … high.

    THREADS
    marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!?
    Fast Food Nastiness
    Gene Ching
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  5. #185
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    I should probably start a CBD thread.


    Aurora Cannabis to research CBD with mixed martial arts outfit UFC, Canopy names new CFO

    By Ciara Linnane
    Published: May 22, 2019 7:37 a.m. ET


    Getty Images

    Aurora Cannabis Inc. shares rose Tuesday, after the Canadian company said it has entered a multiyear, multimillion-dollar agreement with mixed martial arts organization UFC to research the effect of hemp-derived CBD products on athlete recovery and wellness.

    The companies have agreed to conduct the research at UFC’s Las Vegas institute, setting up clinical studies to evaluate CBD, a nonintoxicating ingredient in cannabis and hemp, as a treatment for pain management, inflammation, injury/exercise recovery and mental well being. Aurora shares ACB, +0.58% ACB, +0.00% rose 3%.

    CBD is widely held to have benefits for all of those indications, although there is not a great deal of research to back up the claims, as MarketWatch’s Sarah Toy reported last week. The substance is also caught in regulatory limbo ever since the passage of the 2018 Farm Bill, which fully legalized hemp but moved regulation of CBD to the Food and Drug Administration.

    The FDA has said it would not allow companies to add CBD to food or beverages until a regulatory framework has been created. That’s because CBD is the main ingredient in the only cannabis-based drug to win FDA approval, Epidiolex, a treatment for severe childhood epilepsy developed by GW Pharma PLC.

    The FDA appears ready to allow CBD to be added to cosmetics and topicals for now, although it will not allow companies to make claims regarding their efficacy in treating serious illnesses. Last month, the regulator charged three CBD companies with violating the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and the Federal Trade Commission Act for putting unapproved human and pet drugs into interstate commerce and making unsubstantiated health claims about them, according to Cannabis Law Report.

    The FDA issued warning letters to Advanced Spine and Pain LLC, based in New jersey and Pennsylvania, Nutra Pure LLC, a Washington-based CBD company and Florida-based PotNetwork Holdings.

    “The FDA’s tripartite assault, coupled with its landmark FTC prosecutorial alliance, sent shock waves through both the hemp and legalized Marijuana industries,” said Cannabis Law, noting that health and wellness and food and drinks are what makes CBD attractive to consumers.

    Canopy Growth Corp. shares CGC, +3.51% WEED, +3.23% rose 2.6%, after it named Constellation Brands Inc. STZ, -0.08% executive Mike Lee as interim chief financial officer, replacing Tim Saunders, who will remain at the company as an adviser. Lee will become permanent CFO once Health Canada completes a security clearance that is required for all officers of the company. Constellation Brands invested $4 billion in Canopy last year, arming the Smiths Falls, Ontario-based company with a war chest to expand its business.

    In regulatory news, the National Cannabis Industry Association is holding a legislative briefing Wednesday on the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act, a bipartisan bill aimed at providing protections for banks that serve the cannabis industry in states that have legalized.

    Speakers include Colorado Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter, one of the sponsors of the bill, along with representatives of the banking industry and individual cannabis companies.

    For more on this topic, read: Push for legislation allowing banks to serve the cannabis business is gaining momentum

    Shares of 48North Cannabis Corp. NRTH, -2.56% rose 21%, after the company posted earnings for its fiscal third quarter, showing a net loss of C$1.47 million ($1.1 million) on revenue of C$689,203. The company said it has received an outdoor cultivation license from Health Canada for a 100-acre organic farm in Brant County, Ontario, that it said will be one of the biggest-ever licensed cannabis operations in the world. The company expects to have more than 45,000 kg of dried cannabis in 2019 across its three facilities.

    Tilray Inc. shares TLRY, +5.98% rose 1.1% and Aphria Inc. APHA, -0.29% APHA, -0.44% was up 5.4%. Hexo Corp. HEXO, -0.14% was up 1.0%.

    Medical cannabis retailer MedMen Enterprises Inc. shares MMNFF, -2.42% were flat. Valens GroWorks Corp. VGWCF, -1.68% was down 0.6%.

    Organigram Holdings Inc. US:OGRMF was up 4.1% on its first day of trade on the Nasdaq exchange.

    GW Pharma PLC GWPH, -0.65% was up 3.0% and Green Growth Brands Inc. GGBXF, -1.17% was down 3.9%. Curaleaf Holdings Inc. CURLF, -0.65% was down 0.7%.

    The Horizons Marijuana Life Sciences ETF HMMJ, +1.14% was up 1%, and the ETFMG Alternative Harvest ETF MJ, +0.83% was up 2%.

    The Dow Jones Industrial Average DJIA, -0.20% was up 0.7%, while the S&P 500 SPX, -0.20% was up 0.9%.
    THREADS
    Marijuana & MMA
    marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!?
    Gene Ching
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  6. #186
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    Another China invention...

    ...first pot smokers.

    In China, 2,500-Year-Old Evidence of Cannabis Smoking
    An incense burner from a century tested positive for a chemical that’s released when THC is burned.
    BY KATHERINE J. WU WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12, 2019 NOVA


    A brazier (incense burner) and stones, which would have been exposed to high heat and then used to burn plant matter like cannabis in the Pamir Mountains 2,500 years ago. Image Credit: Xinhua Wu

    Recreational cannabis use is nothing if not versatile. In modern times, the drug is found everywhere from college dorms to medical clinics—but even 2,500 years ago, it apparently had its place in certain ceremonies, a new study shows.

    Reporting today in the journal Science Advances, a team of archaeologists has unearthed traces of cannabis at an ancient burial ground in the mountains of western China. The findings, which the researchers claim are suggestive of intentional drug use during a funeral ritual, may be the oldest unambiguous evidence of intentional cannabis smoking to date.

    The excavation site, located at the Jirzankal Cemetery in the Pamir Mountains, contained charred incense burners (known as braziers) and burnt stones that tested positive for cannabis. The plant itself is native to Asia, and there’s evidence that people have been growing cannabis for its oily seeds and fibers for many millennia. But thousands of years ago, much of the cannabis growing in the region probably yielded mostly hemp—a non-psychedelic variety of cannabis that’s fairly low in tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, the psychoactive ingredient marijuana is chock full of.

    The residue found on the newly discovered braziers, however, tested high for cannabinol—a chemical that’s released when THC is burned. This, the researchers argue, indicates that, unlike many wild varieties, the cannabis smoked at the site, which dates back to about 500 BCE, was pretty potent stuff.

    “Finding evidence for ancient drug use is a bit like finding a needle in a haystack,” study author Nicole Boivin, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, told Aristos Georgiou at Newsweek. “Such a nice, clear signal is pretty unusual.”

    If that’s the case, there are a couple possibilities for where the product came from. Ancient peoples might have sought out varieties from other high-altitude regions, where cannabis plants naturally synthesize more THC as a sort of sunblock, study author Robert Spengler, a paleobotanist at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, told Matt Simon at Wired.

    Alternatively, humans might have already been cultivating cannabis for its mind-melting effects. Both practices have been noted in historical texts, Emily Baragwanath, a classics expert at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who was not involved in the study, told Michelle Z. Donahue at National Geographic.


    An excavated tomb from Jirzankal Cemetery in the Pamir Mountains. The brazier in the study was uncovered from this grave. Image Credit: Xinhua Wu

    However it got to the site, the cannabis was then smoked—possibly to induce a state of altered consciousness to commune with deities or spirits during a burial ceremony. That’s just a theory for now, but other artifacts in the cemetery, including instruments and skeletal remains riddled with injuries sustained at or near the time of death, paint the portrait of a ritualistic—and potentially macabre—scene.

    What’s more, this remote, mountainous region may actually have been something of a drug nexus: Several spots in the Pamir Mountains are thought to have been pit stops along the Silk Road, helping to spread cannabis smoking from Central Asia to the rest of the world. There’s no guarantee recreational use of this plant originated at Jirzankal Cemetery, but in at least some respects, it seems the ancient Chinese may have been ahead of the cannabis curve.
    We knew about early Chinese cannabis use prior to this, but perhaps this is a more recent discovery.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  7. #187
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    wait...China started it...

    ...see the post above.

    Beijing says US legalization of marijuana is a 'threat to China'
    By Yong Xiong and Ben Westcott, CNN
    Updated 9:37 AM ET, Mon June 17, 2019

    At a press conference in Beijing Monday, Liu Yuejin, deputy director of the China National Narcotics Control Commission, said that the number of cannabis users in China had grown by more than 25% in 2018, rising to about 24,000 people.


    Liu Yuejin, deputy director of the China National Narcotics Control Commission, at a press conference on Monday June 17.

    "In two years, we have found increasing cannabis trafficked from North America to China," he said, though he conceded there were "few cannabis abusers in China" relative to the total population.
    According to Liu, China intercepted 115 packages sent through international postal parcels, containing a total of "55 kilograms (1940 ounces) of cannabis and cannabis products" in 2018.
    Liu said that most of the suspects connected to the seized parcels had been foreign students or students who had come home after working abroad. He said most of the drugs had been transported through international express delivery. Liu did not specify how many of the packages came from North America.
    China severely punishes those caught smuggling or trafficking drugs, including foreigners. Anyone found with more than 50 grams (1.76 ounces) of a controlled substance can face the death penalty.
    China has stepped up its efforts to combat the sale of illegal drugs in recent years. Authorities in major cities, including Beijing, have been known to carry out spot drug tests at bars and nightclubs in a bid to clamp down on recreational drug use.
    The move puts it at odds with North America, where cannabis has increasing levels of social acceptance.
    The first marijuana dispensaries opened their doors in Canada in October 2018 after it became just the second country in the world to fully legalize the drug. South of the border, it is legal to buy and possess marijuana in 10 US states, while many others have decriminalized possession of the drug or legalized medical marijuana.
    Cannabis isn't the only drug which has caused divisions between the US and China. Washington has been trying for years to get Beijing to crack down on the country's production and distribution of fentanyl, a deadly prescription drug which is devastating parts of the US.
    Fentanyl is about 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine and 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin. According to the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention, it was linked to one in four overdose deaths in the US in 2018.
    US President Donald Trump has previously accused China of being behind the US opioid crisis, saying in August 2018 that fentanyl was "pouring into the US postal system."
    The Chinese government announced in April that it would crackdown on fentanyl-related substances in what was seen as a concession to the Trump administration, who had been pushing hard for greater enforcement.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #188
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    balance

    Finding Balance with Cannabis
    A Traditional Chinese Medicine Perspective
    Marissa Grund August 2, 2019 2 minutes read



    Every health guru loves to spout the word “balance” when talking about wellness and while some find it to be cliché, balance plays an instrumental and pivotal role in wellness. To be healthy, the body must be in balance or homeostasis. This fundamental need is at the root of our most ancient models of medicine and more recently seen in functional, holistic and naturopathic medicine. To find where balance lies in using cannabis, what better place to look than the millennia-old gold standard of balancing — Chinese medicine.

    Chinese medicine is founded on the belief that when balance falls out of harmony, disease develops. The five elements of the material world (water, earth, metal, wood and fire) give rise to yin and yang qualities in the body. These are further managed by the four bodily humors: qi, blood, body fluid, and essence. Qi is the energy that allows us to live and think, blood is needed for tissue generation and giving balance to the psyche, body fluids keep the body lubricated and protected and essence encompasses the body’s reproductive and regenerative qualities. Chinese medicine determines the state of this precarious, multifaceted teeter totter and uses therapies, especially herbs and food, to bring the body back into balance, into health.

    Cannabis use has been a part of this balance and documented in Chinese medicine since 2700 BCE. It was used for over 100 conditions like gout, rheumatism, and headaches. However, with any nutrient no matter how beneficial, too much can be toxic. Certified in AOBTA and Amma Practitioner, Delaney Willey states, “Simply put, anything and everything out of moderation causes an imbalance.



    Effects
    According to Willey, in traditional Chinese medicine, cannabis opens and heats the body, affecting the liver, gallbladder, lungs, heart, spleen, kidneys and lymphatic system. It also has a direct effect on the immune, nervous, and hormonal systems, furthermore affecting sleep. With so much of the body involved, the use or misuse is profound. If any of these areas are already suffering from excess heat, then opening and heating this organ may exacerbate the issue. For example, treating “liver fire invading the lung” with cannabis may be especially detrimental since cannabis is further heating these important organs.

    Benefits
    From a Chinese medicine perspective, “cannabis promises ‘creativity’,” explains Willey. “It opens and promotes vision and sight of how one wishes to interact with the world.” The mind is opened in the beginning stages of use, but there seems to be a threshold where benefits taper. Ancient texts note that the herb could benefit the five elements and descend blood pressure and cold qi (with its opening and heating qualities).

    Imbalance
    While the mind is initially opened, long-term use can cause loss of direction and gall to make things happen, resulting in boredom. According to Chinese medicine, long-term use may also cause a clogged lymphatic system and the burning up of fluids in the body, drying out the respiratory system (lungs) and digestive system (spleen/stomach). Since cannabis heats so many organs, someone with excess heat (think inflammation, acid reflux, acne) may want to balance their cannabis use.

    Balance
    Willey explains that “[cannabis] is beneficial for those who understand their relationship towards the medicine with every use. Are you using it in excess? Are you using it to limit stress? If so, understanding where stress comes from would be beneficial while using the medicine.” She further notes that, “with any medicine, there should be an understanding of why you are using it.” By making an honest assessment of the body’s current state and understanding your “why,” you can determine if cannabis will bring you closer to or away from balance.

    It's all about balance for any medication, eastern or western.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  9. #189
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    Kung Fu Vapes

    Oh man, srsly? If they sent a sample, I'm sure I could find some one to review it. Maybe a Shaolin Rasta or a Marijuana TCM proponent?

    MARKETING > EVERCANNABIS
    Kung Fu Vapes sees growth ahead
    Mon., Aug. 19, 2019


    Alexis Dawson and John Dawson Jr. of Kung Fu Vapes (Joe Butler / EVERCANNABIS)

    By Joe Butler
    EVERCANNABIS Writer

    Kung Fu Vapes
    4811 N. Market St., Spokane
    (818) 254-8861
    www.kungfuvapes.com

    John Dawson Jr. knows exactly when his “Aha!” moment happened.

    In a tattoo shop in San Diego, a friend asked him to try an early version of a vape pen loaded with hash, a cannabis concentrate.

    He’d smoked pot before growing up but never experienced the type of high as he did with that device. He instantly knew that plenty of people are going to love their cannabis this way, and he wanted to be part of it.

    “We went on a mission right then to all the stores around town and bought any kind of e-cigarette and vape pen we could find, so we could take them all apart, see how they were made, and see if we could figure out how to make them better,” said Dawson.

    Today, a decade later, Dawson is the owner of Kung Fu Vapes, which provides components for vaporizers, including batteries and cartridges, plus all sorts of pens and pocket rigs designed for heating cannabis concentrates or oil.

    “We love to help design, brand, and package products for different companies,” he said.

    Located on Market Street in the Hillyard area, he and co-owner/brand manager Alexis Dawson now work with producers and processors and retailers in 25 states.

    While Kung Fu Vapes must follow state rules governing the sale and use of vape products, the restrictions for 502 licensees don’t apply, allowing it sell and distribute outside of Washington.

    “This evolution is a trip – we have a small niche of the industry, but we’re doing huge numbers around the country and even internationally,” John Dawson said.

    Vape pens/e-cigs can deliver a more potent experience than smoking flower. They’re also more discreet than a traditional pipe or bong, can easily fit in a pocket or purse, and the vapor doesn’t fill the lungs or have a strong odor like pot smoke does.

    A client may have ideas of what they want or don’t want in their next vape product. Or Dawson’s manufacturing partners in China may suggest new products and materials. Mostly, the ideas for come from his own hands-on research.

    “We’re always trying to push the industry forward,” he said. “We never want to follow trends – we want to create them.”

    He also likes to visit different growers and social media/industry influencers, and is always attending cannabis events around the country, either as a vendor or an attendee to learn what new products are in the works. It’s also a chance to educate consumers and possible partners about everything Kung Fu Vapes can bring to the table.

    He and Alexis essentially do everything – it would easy to hire sales people around the country, but he likes being hands-on and involved in all discussions and decisions.

    Kung Fu Vapes recently released the Quasar pod system, a one-time use fillable pen that’s already receiving praise for its portability, stability, and ability to use different types of oil. It’s child-proof, and there’s no wicking or alloys involved.

    Later this year, it plans to release Kung Fu Vitals, a pre-filled device containing CBD oil sourced from high-quality hemp grown in New York.

    Dawson said this is a great time for the industry. Though there are a lot of vape products, producers/processors want to make sure their customers have safe, reliable and enjoyable products, and that’s where he thinks Kung Fu Vapes has established a great reputation.

    “What we’re seeing right now is this perfect blending of electronic materials and cannabis, and it’s all going to get bigger,” he said. “There are a lot of products out there, but your hardware is going to define you.”

    Joe Butler is a longtime marketing writer and editor at The Spokesman-Review. He’s an enthusiast of Star Wars, commemorative spoon collecting, and the Oxford comma.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  10. #190
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    Long form journalism from good ol' Newsweek

    Pop Culture Says CBD Cures Everything—Here's What Scientists Say
    BY DAVID H. FREEDMAN ON 08/29/19 AT 5:00 AM EDT


    CBD, which comes from hemp, doesn’t make you high. But many people use it for sleep, pain, anxiety and other health issues. It comes in oils, lotions, “vape” cartridges, smokable “flower” and candy. Medical science is just starting to catch up.
    FROM LEFT: MAREN CARUSO/GETTY; THOMAS VOGEL/GETTY

    Jonathan Duce entered Dion's, his neighborhood liquor store in Waltham, Massachusetts, walked past the wine and six-packs and headed straight for the gummy worms. At $69 for a jar of 25, they were more expensive than the Chateauneuf du Pape, but he didn't mind. His wife likes them, he says, because they help her sleep.The gummies aren't just candy. Each one packs a 30-milligram wallop of cannabidiol, or CBD, a constituent of the cannabis plant, more commonly known as hemp, a cousin of marijuana. Dion's started selling CBD products four months ago and now one in every 15 people who walk in buys at least one of the store's 30 CBD products, which include tinctures, vaping cartridges, smokable "flower," capsules and lotions. "But gummies are our biggest mover," says Kristen Correia, who works behind the counter.Duce, 54, prefers rubbing salve on his neck to relieve the stress of work. "We discovered CBD at a farmer's market a few months ago," he says." Instead of taking a prescription drug, I'd rather take something like this that comes from a plant."Mass-market retailers like CVS, Walgreens and Krogers have already signed up to carry CBD products with Walmart said to be close behind them. CBD candies and other products have been widely available online and in tens of thousands of small stores across most states; and the entrance of large retailers is about to pour gas on that fire. Big Food and Beverage lurks in the wings with its own plans to inundate the world with CBD ice cream and beer. The Brightfield Group, a market research firm, projects that CBD annual sales in the U.S., now at $600 million, will grow by a factor of 40 to $23 billion by 2023.


    OPENRANGESTOCK/GETTY

    Hardly anyone had heard of CBD three years ago, but now two-thirds of Americans are familiar with it, according to a recent Gallup survey. One in seven Americans use it as an over-the-counter treatment for pain, anxiety and sleep problems. They have also turned to CBD for depression, muscle spasms, digestive issues and skin ailments. One in three pet owners give it to their dogs and cats, says a survey by market-research firm Packaged Facts. It's also been touted as a treatment for cancer, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. One medical clinic reported that CBD relieved 90 percent of all symptoms in all its patients."Consumers are participating in one of the largest uncontrolled clinical trials in history, and no one really knows what it is they're taking," says Pal Pacher, an investigator at the National Institutes of Health and president of the International Cannabinoid Research Society. "It's scary."Trouble is, almost all of the claims are currently unsubstantiated. Clinical trials have failed to produce convincing evidence that CBD works on anything other than rare epilepsies, the sole treatment licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The agency, in fact, forbids companies from attributing any other health benefits to the substance. (It reprimanded Curaleaf, a startup, for making unsubstantiated claims about cancer and other diseases.)

    "As far as we know, this may all be mostly a placebo effect," says Pacher. "Everybody is being sucked into the big hype."The one thing scientists know about CBD is that it's reasonably safe. There is solid data supporting the notion that it does no harm. "There are no credible issues with toxicity, and most people tolerate it quite well," says Michael Tagen, a pharmacology researcher who consults for pharmaceutical companies about cannabis-related neuroscience.Beyond safety, science doesn't tell us much one way or the other. But that leaves open the possibility that CBD does some good and that at least some of the claims that people make about its restorative powers are true. Many scientists, in fact, think that further testing will uncover additional benefits—but which ones, if any, remain to be seen.Europe and Israel have gotten a big head start on CBD research due to long standing legal restrictions in the U.S., but American scientists are rushing to catch up. In the meantime, says Tagen, "People should feel free to try CBD and see if it works for them."What's it good for?Everyone seems to know someone who raves about what CBD has done for them. Words like "miraculous" appear frequently in media reviews. Aside from anecdotes, there is some scientific evidence that CBD has benefits beyond epilepsy. These come mainly from observational studies, which track improvements after patients take CBD. Many people show improvements with sleep, anxiety, digestive problems and a variety of aches and pains. Such studies lack the controlled comparisons to a placebo or other treatment, which is critical to getting a drug approved. But they are still considered scientific evidence, if of a weaker sort, and often establish promise for drugs long before clinical trials can confirm it.While the animal and human observational evidence supports CBD's potential effectiveness for many conditions, the picture is far from clear. Consider CBD's impact on sleep and anxiety. A study from the University of Colorado Denver published earlier this year followed 103 patients with a mix of sleep and anxiety problems over three months of CBD treatment, finding that on average, CBD helped with anxiety, but sleep benefits faded after a month, possibly because the brain builds up a tolerance. And yet a similar patient study found the mirror opposite: that CBD gave sustained benefits on sleep but not anxiety. Rodent studies, too, go back and forth on the same questions.This sort of hit-or-miss evidence has also been turning up for CBD's ability to fight the "inflammation" caused when the body's immune system attacks healthy cells. Inflammation is considered a cause or symptom of a wide range of ailments, including allergies, heart disease and illnesses of the gut. "Most major diseases are inflammatory, and that alone would make CBD useful," says Maurizio Bifulco, a professor and CBD researcher at the University of Naples Federico II Medical School in Italy.Likewise, research indicates that CBD may—or may not—be helpful for psychosis, opioid withdrawal, arthritis, antibiotic-resistant infections, non-Parkinson's tremors, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, tissue rejection after transplants, the side effects of cancer chemotherapy and even for several types of cancer itself, including the most aggressive and untreatable form of brain cancer. (Oddly enough, the property that wins CBD the most praise from users—pain relief—is one of the most weakly supported, with CBD often failing to provide much benefit in studies.)Scientists are not deterred by this conflicting data. Many new drugs get mixed results in tests—even Tylenol, a proven pain reliever for millions of people, comes up short in some trials. The clinical trials on CBD that have been done so far could have been flawed in ways that missed some of its healing properties. Hundreds of new trials now getting underway may do a better job of zeroing in them. "We really don't know what to measure in patients right now," Pacher says. "I do think in the longer term we'll figure that out and see some positive results in clinical trials."What impresses researchers most about CBD is that it offers at least a hint of effectiveness against such a wide range of often serious and hard-to-treat conditions without providing a corresponding hint of the problematic and sometimes dangerous side effects that hang over virtually all other drugs. Of those who use CBD oil, 40 percent take it daily, according to Paul Norman, CEO of Heavenly Rx, a major producer of CBD products. A survey by Consumer Reports earlier this year that found 22 percent of CBD users are using it as a substitute for prescription medications.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
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  11. #191
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    Continued from previous post


    Hemp clones at Wild Folk Farm are prepared for planting. Businesses, undeterred by conflicting results in clinical trials, are ramping up to meet a growing demand.
    GETTY/BEN MCCANNA/PORTLAND PRESS HERALD

    Industry Rushes InA more relaxed regulatory environment has helped set the stage for the CBD boom. Although the hemp plant includes only trace amounts of THC, it is a close cousin to marijuana. (CBD can also come from marijuana plants in which the THC has been bred out or extracted.) While there are still occasional stories of CBD busts and seizures at hemp farms, mom-and-pop stores and airports, they are rapidly vanishing. That's due to public outrage over any effort to suppress what's increasingly seen as a beneficial and harmless substance and to federal and state efforts to spell out CBD's legality. It helped, too, that the 2018 Farm Bill passed by Congress protected hemp growers, processors and sellers from federal or state prosecution, with reasonable qualifications such as keeping THC levels below 0.3 percent of the dry weight of the product. "There are still FDA restrictions," notes Brandon Beatty, CEO of Bluebird Botanicals, one of the better-known purveyors of CBD, with 2018 sales of $14 million. "But at least there's no risk now from the Drug Enforcement Administration."

    With consumers going all in and the government backing off, the business world has stepped up to meet demand. Bluebird's 2018 sales were more than double its 2017 figures and the company says it's on track to more than double sales this year, too. That's typical for the industry. Veritas Farms, another major player and a publicly traded company, has also doubled revenues annually for the last two years and turned in first-quarter revenues this year of more than $1.5 million, nearly four times higher than the same quarter last year.Big retail's entry will keep that streak going. Veritas is already in 950 stories, including CVS and Rite Aid, and expects to reach 1,350 stores this year across 22 states as Kroger starts hawking the company's products. Heavenly Rx, another major player, brought in CEO Norman from Kellogg, where he ran the company's $9 billion North American business. "The CBD industry's future is in mainstream distribution," says Norman, adding that he thinks as much as two-thirds of all CBD products will be sold in big stores by 2022.The boom will be even bigger when CBD starts getting infused into major consumer products, such as cosmetics. Most of the stuff is currently sold as tinctures and capsules, but consumers have also taken to slathering it on their skin. Most of the leading CBD manufacturers have started selling a range of lotions and balms and major cosmetics retailer Sephora has taken on topical CBD products from Estée Lauder and other companies.Soon consumers may be getting CBD with almost anything they put in their mouths. "Global food, beverage and tobacco companies are just treading water waiting for the FDA to allow them to add CBD," says Brady Cobb, CEO of SOL Global Investments, a cannabis-focused investment firm that owns 45 percent of Heavenly Rx. "When that happens, they're going to plunge in head first." Among the companies that have reportedly already made plans to bring out CBD-infused products are Coca-Cola, Molson Coors Brewing and American Premium Water. Heavenly Rx has invested in craft soda maker Jones Soda, with the intention of eventually bringing out CBD versions. It's also acquired a line of protein bars for the same reason. "CBD can help with recovery after a yoga workout," explains Norman—a claim many users would endorse, though no study has clearly proven that CBD aids in workout recovery.


    Cannabinoid extracts have been approved in Thailand.
    GUILLAUME PAYEN/SOPA IMAGES/LIGHTROCKET/GETTY

    What's in the bottle?With CBD products, it's hard to be sure what you're getting. THC aside, most companies boast of offering "broad spectrum" or "full spectrum" CBD products, which means other ingredients from hemp plants end up in the mix besides CBD. There are in fact hundreds of compounds in hemp falling into a variety of categories with names like cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids.Many consumers are already sold on the notion of "the entourage effect"—the scientifically unsubstantiated, though not entirely implausible, claim that the different ingredients somehow combine to provide health benefits that go beyond what any of the individual components might do. But good luck sorting out which of those ingredients are actually present in a given CBD product and in what quantities. "'Full spectrum' is a meaningless marketing term," says Tagen. "It's rare that any of these companies actually test for these ingredients and even rarer that they release the results."In fact, it's hard for consumers to know much of anything about what they might be getting when they buy a CBD product. "Some of these companies have zero science behind what they're doing," says Karyemaître Aliffe a Seattle-based physician and pharmaceutical researcher who runs a small biotech company and teaches at the University of Miami Medical School. "The quality control and regulatory oversight for CBD is not much beyond what it is for Snickers bars."Studies have indicated CBD products from some established vendors can have CBD levels well below or above what's claimed on the label, along with illegally high levels of THC and contaminants including heavy metals and pesticides. The hemp plant tends to pull in whatever lies in the soil and hang onto it, so unless the soil or resulting products are carefully tested—still not the case for many CBD products, especially those imported into the U.S. rather than grown and produced here—there may be risks for any number of toxins.For what it's worth, vendors like Bluebird, Veritas and Heavenly Rx insist they have rigorous quality-control and testing programs in place and enlist independent firms to analyze and certify their products.
    continued next post
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  12. #192
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    Continued from previous post


    Samantha Brown’s daughter Kaylee, 5, depends on a cannabis oil to manage seizures. Millions of people now use CBD to treat themselves, their children or their pets. So far, the FDA has approved CBD only for two forms of epilepsy, but the substance is widely considered to be safe.
    GETTY/DEREK DAVIS/PORTLAND PRESS HERALD

    But even if you knew exactly what is in the bottle, is there enough of it to do you any good? There's little understanding of CBD dosages at this point, but what scientists do know suggests the amounts normally advertised as a typical dose are probably well below what's needed to make a big dent in a health problem. The rare childhood epilepsies—the one condition considered proven to be treatable with CBD—are treated with daily doses in the range of 500 milligrams, or about a sixtieth of an ounce—and that's for children. The standard recommended adult dose of over-the-counter CBD oil is an eyedropper-full, typically amounting to between a fiftieth and a hundredth as much CBD as the child-epilepsy dose. It wouldn't be advisable to take hundreds of milligrams a day—that would require chugging a whole bottle—outside of a doctor's care, but anyone who did would likely be paying more than a thousand dollars a month for the habit.Cecilia Hillard, director of the Neuroscience Research Center of the Medical College of Wisconsin, and one of the U.S.'s more prominent CBD researchers, says that she's encountered people who actually take such large over-the-counter doses and who do in fact report higher levels of relief from such problems as neuropathic pain. But one big hitch, notes Hillard, is that at doses that large, many CBD products would be delivering enough THC along with it to provide a bit of a high and that's more likely where the relief is coming from. "Even at high doses, the effects of CBD itself tend to be mild," she says. Human studies of CBD using purified and tested versions of CBD with little or no THC have shown effectiveness against acute anxiety, but they use single doses in the range of 300 milligrams—dozens of times larger than what a typical consumer takes. If CBD vendors were to recommend such high doses, it would raise concerns about as-yet-undiscovered side effects. And it prices CBD treatment out of the reach of most consumers.Tongue vs gut vs clinical trialsAdding to the uncertainties over CBD's effectiveness is the variation in how it gets into the bloodstream, which is where it has to go to do any good. Smoking and vaping are relatively efficient ways to take it—they deliver about half of the CBD in a dose to the bloodstream in seconds. But they carry health risks similar to smoking and vaping tobacco. Placing a tincture under the tongue and holding it there for a minute delivers about 20 percent of the CBD, with a delay of a few minutes. Swallowing CBD is the least efficient of all—only 10 percent makes it into the bloodstream because liver enzymes break CBD down in the gut—and what does make it through can take two hours to reach your blood. Eating fatty foods helps, because CBD dissolves in fat and is thus more easily absorbed in the gut before being broken down. But that doesn't bode well for consumption via fat-free beer or soda. "You'd end up with vanishingly small amounts in your body," says Hillard. "I can't imagine that little doing anything at all."


    One hazard of an unregulated industry is that consumers can’t be sure what dosage they’re getting. A lot also depends on the method used for taking the CBD. Vaping delivers about half the CBD to the bloodstream in seconds, but carries some health risks.
    GETTY/BSIP

    That makes taking CBD under the tongue—so-called sublingual consumption—a winner in many experts' and aficionados' minds. But you won't see that recommended on your bottle of CBD oil. That's partly because many consumers don't like the oily, grassy-tasting stuff pooling around their mouths. It's also because the FDA doesn't allow unapproved references to sublingual dosing, considering it a drug-delivery mechanism. "Under the tongue is my personal preference," says Alexander Salgado, CEO of Veritas Farms, "but I can't say that on a label until the FDA provides some clarity." If the FDA relents on that score, Salgado predicts there'll be a big market for CBD-saturated strips that dissolve under the tongue.Chewing gum could hit another sweet-spot. Axim Biotechnologies, which has patents on gum-based drug delivery and FDA approval, is selling gum with 10 milligrams of CBD. "A chemotherapy patient can chew a piece and get immediate relief," claims Axim CEO John Huemoeller. The company will soon introduce a line of mass-market "wellness" gums that mix CBD with caffeine, ginseng, melatonin, tryptophan (the ingredient in turkey that supposedly makes everyone sleepy after Thanksgiving dinner) and other ingredients. It's also starting clinical trials of toothpaste and mouthwash that will aim CBD's claimed anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties against gingivitis and periodontitis.
    Researchers are now fashioning clinical trials to learn which patients can be helped by what form of CBD. More than 500 trials are in the works around the world, says Hillard, fueled partly by startups already profiting from CBD. One firm, Kannalife Sciences, is designing clinical trials for treating chemotherapy side effects, liver disease, chronic skin conditions, non-Parkinson's tremors and even stage IV cancers. "At stage IV you have to hit the cancer with a sledgehammer," says CEO Dean Petkanas. "We want to transfuse 10,000 milligrams of CBD into bone marrow to see if it reduces the proliferation of cancer cells."Researchers will have to ply the scientific method through hype-roiled waters for years. In the meantime, doctors, scientists and consumers will have to feel their way. "Cannabinoid therapeutics is a completely new frontier," says Petkanas. "We're just where antibiotics were in the 1930s."
    I'm launching this new CBD (cannabidiol) thread, independant from our marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!? thread. I think I've plucked the only CBD specific news piece above. If anyone sees another, just post the html here and I'll copy that too. I suppose many of them are relevant, given that this is the TCM forum, but I'm looking specifically for mentions of CBD and the forum doesn't search out 3 letter words (or anagrams in this case).
    Gene Ching
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  13. #193
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    CBD - it's time has come...

    I did start that CBD thread by copying a few posts off the Marijuana & MMA and marijuana tcm?!?!?!?!!? threads.

    How CBD Got Into The World Of Mixed Martial Arts (MMA)
    January 04, 2020 7:41pm



    By WeedMaps News' Adam Woodhead, provided exclusively to Benzinga Cannabis.

    Roman Mironenko's story as a professional mixed martial artist is a familiar one. After some career-high points, including a stint on the Russian reality show Mixfighter, he retired to train and teach Brazilian jiu-jitsu (BJJ) in Marseille, France. But due to the intense pain from a disc herniation from his competing days, his training was sidelined for months. He eventually found relief in a CBD oil he took sublingually twice a day. In time, he was able to return to BJJ training.

    Mironenko's story is just one of many where professional and amaeteur fighters use CBD to help recover and protect their bodies from the physical and psychological toll of mixed martial arts (MMA).

    It's a trend that MMA fighters find themselves ahead on compared to the rest of the sports world. Writing for the Telegraph, longtime fight sports journalist Gareth Davies argued that MMA athletes looking for pain management and “neuro-protective plusses” to protect against traumatic brain injuries had anticipated the CBD trend ahead of most other athletes and sports organizations.

    The trend became all the more evident when major MMA organizations began endorsing CBD wholeheartedly. In June of 2019, Bellator MMA, one of the largest MMA promotion companies, announced it had partnered with cbdMD, a CBD products brand that also sponsors professional fighters Chael Sonnen, Jorge Masvidal, and Daniel Cormier.

    A month later, the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), the largest and most successful MMA promotion company in the world, got into the mix when the UFC Performance Institute and publicly traded Canadian giant Aurora Cannabis announced they would be partnering up to clinically study whether CBD can treat the aches and pains of UFC fighters. The findings will be used to develop a line of hemp-derived CBD topicals.

    Leslie Smith, a veteran MMA fighter and one of the first female fighters in the UFC, told Weedmaps News she can't quite remember when she first encountered CBD.

    “Cannabis has always been such a big part of my life and my training,” Smith said. “I don't know if it's a shared love and appreciation for cannabis and healthy living that brought me to San Francisco and [Cesar Gracie] team, or if it just happened to work out that way.”

    CBD enters the UFC with the “Nate Diaz rule.”
    While Smith doesn't recall when she first encountered CBD, she does remember when CBD broke to the larger UFC public. The conversation around CBD began with a fighter who, like Smith, was part of the team at Cesar Gracie Academy: Nate Diaz.

    “I think it was when Nate Diaz vaporized CBD right after his fight at the press conference,” Smith said. “I feel like that was the time that it really meshed the use of CBD in the fighting community ... and the general public.”

    In August of 2016, following his rematch with Conor McGregor at UFC 202, Diaz was seen using a vape cartridge at the post-fight Press Conference. Dosing with CBD after a fight or sparring session is something that Smith practiced as well, using a 5,000-milligram full-spectrum tincture from Alpha Cannax.

    “I definitely take it after any sparring session. Any time that I'm sparring and my head is getting hit,” she said. “I take it immediately after the practice, and then I take it again at night time. Basically, for as long as I'm feeling fuzzy.”



    At the time, however, all cannabinoids, including CBD, were banned during competition and the incident was flagged by the media as a potential doping violation. Debate about whether Diaz had violated a rule ensued. This resulted in the creation of the so-called “Nate Diaz Rule” in 2018, under which CBD is allowed during competition even if other cannabinoids are not.

    At open workouts before his match up with Anthony Pettis at UFC 241, Diaz found himself the subject of media scrutiny once again when he lit a joint and passed it to fans in the crowd. Diaz claimed it was CBD flower, but either way, the use of cannabinoids was well outside the bounds of the in-competition period.

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    MMA fighters are still cautious about using CBD
    While CBD is gaining in popularity among fighter athletes, they are still cautious about how and when they use it when training and recovering. CBD's emergence has come at a time when concern over tainted supplements, false positives, retroactive sanctions, and potentially canceled events is at an all-time high.

    The Diaz brothers' regular conflict with, and sanctions from, officials have been noted by their fellow athletes. In the run-up to a recent bout in Oklahoma, Smith switched her CBD supplement as a precaution.

    “The commission there in Thackerville does not allow you to have any metabolites in your system at all,” she said. “Even the small amount that would show up inside of the [Alpha Cannax] full-spectrum CBD would have cost me some money and gotten me some bad publicity. So I was taking Game Up Nutrition as I was getting ready for that fight.”

    The fear of testing positive for THC from taking a CBD product is a sentiment echoed to Weedmaps News by John Kelly, the head coach and owner of Live Free Crossfit, and the fighter he trains, UFC heavyweight Jairzinho Rozenstruik.

    “These guys work really hard,” Kelly said. “If for some reason they get popped for THC when they were trying to take a supplement, then it's going to destroy everything that they worked towards.”

    Finding trust in a CBD product that will both work and not cause a fighter to run afoul of the rules is paramount to fighters interested in using CBD. After some research, Kelly opted for Cannafornia CBD for Rozenstruik's training. “I looked into the company pretty deeply and I saw all the third party testing, and I saw that there were very low levels of THC,” Kelly said. “So that was one of the deciding factors that made us go with [Cannafornia], was how clean the product was.”

    Rozenstruik is also one of the top tier UFC athletes sponsored by Cannafornia CBD. Others have included Derrick Lewis and — until a falling out in December — Colby Covington, who Cannafornia CEO Paul King told Weedmaps News was the first fighter he decided to work with after the pair met in Miami. King said that Kelly works as the strength and conditioning coach for three of six fighters sponsored by the company.

    Rozenstruik uses CBD as a topical rub before and after training, and orally before bed. His dosage is approximately 33 milligrams, which is doubled after intense training sessions.

    “It helps, especially when you do strength training and your body gets sore,” Rozenstruik said. “I use the cream on my body and it really helps me recover really fast."

    One of the most productive ways to use CBD is as a way to find balance in a fighter's training, according to Kelly. Using CBD to find the range between not being overtrained or undertrained is what allows athletes to optimally perform on fight night.

    “It's all about homeostasis,” Kelly said.

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    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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