Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 67

Thread: the kung fu of clothing.

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Xi'an, P.R.C.
    Posts
    1,693
    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    But Omar, even the picture you posted shows the secondary colours.

    where did that purple, green and yellow come from?
    From the link in the previous post:
    The three cells per pixel then work in conjunction to produce color. For example, if a pixel needs to be white, each transistor that controls the three color cells in the pixel would remain off, thus allowing red, green and blue to pass through. Your eye sees the combination of the three primary colors, so close in proximity to each other, as white light.
    White...or which over color is needed.

    It's just combinations of really tiny dots of red, blue and green in varying combinations of intensity that register in the human eye as skittles.

    red, orange, yellow, blue, green, indigo, violet. no?
    Those colors all exist. They are just not needed in a computer display. I really don't understand how Green mixes with red to get yellow. It's completely counter intuitive to me but there it is. I understand the theory, it's just not intuitive at all.

    I also have a feeling that DJ is trying to get me to say that the light emitting from the pixels on a screen combines to produce the colors but AFAIK, if you look close enough at the screen, it's still 3 separate dots. You kind of need to run special software to see it. You need the screen to present a very simply image or there's too much visual noise for your brain to sort it out. The image would be something like a black screen with just a single pixel illuminated. That makes it stand out. That's also why if you want to inspect a new computer monitor properly, you need to run special testing software that basically just cycles the screen from all black to all white and sometimes also through RGB one at a time. It's the only way you can really see what's going on with an individual pixel that is not working right.

    DJ seems to be implying that the light combines into a color on the screen. my understanding is that it combines in your brain.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,114

    Slightly OT



    FASHION
    Designer Umit Benan’s Latest Collection Is a Martial Arts Action Flick Come to Life

    BY NOAH JOHNSON
    4 DAYS AGO
    We talk Jean Claude Van Damme, tennis, Mickey Rourke, and ‘80s style with the man who made judo robes fresh this season.

    Umit Benan staged his Fall-Winter 2016 runway show around a naked tattooed woman covered in sushi. The models were street-cast tough guys in judo suits, shearling jackets, and elegantly cut overcoats. “My shows are always ironic,” Benan has said. “The men in my show are never perfect. I don’t like perfect.” Perhaps that sentiment is what makes Umit—the man, the clothes, the life—so **** cool. He doesn’t hide his inspirations, whether it’s dojo garb, cowboy gangs of the American West, or retro tennis badasses. His capacity to take familiar style tropes and flip them into something instantly cool, something you never thought you’d wear but suddenly need, is seemingly limitless. On Instagram between his two accounts (one, two) he shares the clothes, travels and friends that define his aesthetic—including plenty of awesome selfies.


    A scene from Benan's Tokyo Diaries presentation in Paris. Morgan O'Donovan/MOD54Ltd

    Earlier this summer, Benan released a collection of tennis sneakers on his site, which he titled Off Court. His fall collection, titled Tokyo Diaries, was presented in Paris earlier this year, but today it’s available for the first time on his site. We reached out by email to hear a bit more about his latest drops, and what’s next for Umit Benan.

    What inspired this new collection, Tokyo Diaries?

    In 2014 I visited Tokyo about 16 times. I was working on a made-in-Japan project for my line. Every time I would work 'til late hours I would go to the Golden Gai area to a have a drink and relax. Golden Gai is made from four tiny streets, and there are about 200 bars. A very inspiring area. You can see very interesting characters every time you hang out there. But one thing above all inspired me the most: the kids leaving the martial arts school and hanging out in the bars drinking and having a bite. So what I had done for my Fall-Winter 2016 collection was to create an environment inspired by the judo kids and mix it with my vision of martial arts movies I had seen as a kid, which were mostly Jean Claude Van Damme movies. Technically the clothes and style was based on guys leaving the training sessions with their judo outfits and just putting their daily regular pieces on top such as a classic coat or a bomber jacket.


    Morgan O'Donovan/MOD54Ltd

    Morgan O'Donovan/MOD54Ltd

    You also recently released a collection of tennis sneakers through your own site. Is this part of a new strategy for you?

    This is something I basically live in. I spent my childhood playing tennis back home. I trained many years, and I still do play twice a week a least. It’s my passion. I always dreamed to be a world-ranked tennis player. So when I was ready to create my sneakers of course I created an old school tennis-inspired sneakers. Which I call UMIT BENAN OFF COURT. It is the perfect shoe in my opinion, that has design elements but does not look too fashion. So yes, I’m really happy to create a shoe that I am obsessed with. I have about 42 color ways done for myself. The next step will be to create a wardrobe for these sneakers. A high fashion tennis line.


    The Off Court sneakers in action. Simone Falcetta

    Your references range greatly—from the American West to the Far East. How do you arrive at your inspirations?

    There is no explanation to how I arrive to be inspired. I do dream a lot. It always starts with, “I wish I was…” I mostly imagine myself being in different situations or even time frames. But it’s very spontaneous. It’s is a mix of what I dream when I close my eyes, and my childhood memories.

    Fashion and music are connected at the hip right now. Are there any artists you are excited by right now? Anyone you would like to work with?

    I listen to many different kinds of music. Must be connected to my international background. I love Latin music. I love Greek music, Turkish, pop, jazz, piano, hip-hop. My iTunes is a mess when it’s on shuffle. But one thing you will never see me listening is metal. I basically cannot stand that sound…. A$AP Rocky would look good in my clothes. And I also like Dev Hynes very much.


    Pieces from Umit Benan Fall-Winter 2016, available today.

    Celebrities have become fashion fixtures. Does that bother you at all?

    I like old-school celebrities. Celebrities that were good at their job. One job. I grew up in a real celebrity world. Where you could not see any of them unless in the street. I remember seeing Mickey Rouke and Carre Otis at the Four Seasons in Milan in the early ‘90s. I could not talk for hours. Those days it was something else. Today it doesn't excite me or inspire me. When it comes to dressing them up, I go mostly for the attitude and flexibility. I would have liked to dress Mickey Rouke in the old days. Today: Brad Pitt.

    Where do you spend your time living and working these days?

    I live in Lake Lugano, and I have my office in Milan. I drive everyday back and forth. This is my daily routine. Other then that every two weeks max I’m around Europe or the States.

    Where is your favorite place in the world to travel?

    Palm Springs. But in general the US. I just love jumping in a car and driving for days, weeks in that land. Mostly the southwest and California.


    Morgan O'Donovan/MOD54Ltd

    There's been plenty of political turmoil in Turkey this year. How has that affected your work?

    The political situation in Turkey does not change my life, as I have no business there. It worries me tremendously as my family still lives there. I hate politics and religion—two things that cause war between humans.

    What was your last tattoo?

    Two graphic roses on my shoulders. My last collection LOS *******OS was inspired by the Mexicans that live in Texas. TEJANOS. So I created this imaginary character named Hector Benan. I got so into that character so I added the Mexican roses and left a goatee to feel the collection vibe.


    Selfie via Umit Benan himself.

    Who's the most stylish person you know?

    Can name many in the ‘80s, but for me Mickey Rouke in the old days. Style has to be natural and effortless. The ’80s were natural and effortless.

    What's next for you after the Tokyo Diaries release?

    I have done the Spring-Summer 2017 collection: LOS *******OS. Haven’t released it yet—in about 3 weeks I will be doing my show for that collection in Tokyo.

    See you there!
    I'm glad to see martial arts influence in GQ Style, but this doesn't quite work for me...except for the Nyotaimori.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,114

    Again with the Kung Fu fashion statement

    I don't really see the Kung Fu in this, but whatev. Fashionistas clearly think we dress funny.






    Han Kjøbenhavn’s SS17 Is Kung Fu B-Movie Meets Sharp-Trashy Danish Suburbia

    By Jack Drummond in Fashion 4 hours ago

    Copenhagen label Han Kjøbenhavn presents one of its most personal collections to date for SS17, channelling a childhood love of kung fu B-movies filtered through a lens of teenagedom spent in Danish suburbia.

    The collection rests on pieces that blur back-and-forth between “street” and menswear, with a deliberately unglamorous, straight-up, no messing Scandinavian edge. The Euro-trashy purple tracksuit is a vibe, particularly when rocked with the council estate classic car coat, which Han Kjøbenhavn upgrades with biker jacket-esque lapels and chunky zips.

    Punchy Chinese characters are splayed across garms in a deliberately incorrect, off-kilter homage to the label heads’ love of martial art B-movies – all filtered through grimy ’90s Danish suburbia. Rather than being a tribute to “real” Chinese culture, it’s thoroughly grounded in the designers’ memories and “how we – 13 year old suburban kids – interpreted this,” according to their accompanying press release. “We didn’t know **** about the real craft and history behind martial arts or anything like it. For us martial arts was Van Damme grabbing fish blindfolded and beating up Chong Lee.”

    Raw hems, long and flowing cuts and a splash of pin stripes across a muted, dusky color palette add to a gorgeously raw and dingy Far East menswear look. Think Singapore back alley suits, Danish crime drama and karate. Take a look at the on-point lookbook shots above, taken in what looks like your local neighborhood Chinese takeaway joint, or get a feel for the collection on the runway with our Han Kjøbenhavn’s Copenhagen Fashion Week show snaps.

    The SS17 collection drops soon via their online store.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 1970
    Location
    Canada!
    Posts
    23,099
    Those are not standard run of the mill models at all.

    Ima stick with jeans and a T. It's timeless.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Tampa, FL
    Posts
    104
    scary looking old men should not be clothing models...

    Just saying.

    No fu themes that I can see.

    Just using a buzzword they do not understand.
    Dr. Dale Dugas
    Hakka Mantis
    Integrated Eskrima
    Pukulan Cimande Pusaka Sanders

    All for Use
    Nothing for Show

  6. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by David Jamieson View Post
    Those are not standard run of the mill models at all.

    Ima stick with jeans and a T. It's timeless.


    Wow...I never thought that I could be a model, but these guys inspire me.
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by RD'S Alias - 1A

    I have easily beaten every one I have ever fought.....

  7. #52
    Trash.

    I prefer suits. But Im generally not in them.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,869
    That stuff has zero relationship to 'kung fu' or 'kung fu movies'. And that model looks like a creepy undertaker in a western movie. Or a mad doctor in an old Hammer horror film.

  9. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    That stuff has zero relationship to 'kung fu' or 'kung fu movies'. And that model looks like a creepy undertaker in a western movie. Or a mad doctor in an old Hammer horror film.
    They look like terrorists. But I profile so I might be biased. One looked like a Nazi.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    CA, USA
    Posts
    4,869
    Quote Originally Posted by boxerbilly View Post
    They look like terrorists. But I profile so I might be biased. One looked like a Nazi.
    Sorry...I was referring to the skinny old guy. He also looks like a stereotypical Chester the Molester in some of those pics.
    Last edited by Jimbo; 03-17-2017 at 10:01 PM.

  11. #56
    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Sorry...I was referring to the skinny old guy. He also looks like a stereotypical Chester the Molester in some of those pics.
    That's what many Nazis were. Funny because the Left admire these types. Che and Mao and they wont admit it but HITLER. Some how it escapes their pea brains that is in fact what you are modeling your behavior and actions after. They just don't get it. Socialism, Marxism, Communism. Democrats. Its all the same.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,114

    Slightly OT

    Intriguing trend. I admire cultures wearing traditional attire but the Cult Rev crushed that notion in PRC. Then there's this:

    The Hanfu fashion revival: ancient Chinese dress finds a new following
    400 years after falling out of favour, the flowing, and sometimes controversial, robes of the Han ethnic group are back in style
    PUBLISHED : Saturday, 21 October, 2017, 9:16am
    UPDATED : Sunday, 22 October, 2017, 2:05pm
    Alice Yan



    When Luo Zhenchen first put on Hanfu, the traditional dress of China’s Han people, its wide sleeves, crossed collars and long robes transformed him.
    “I felt a strong sense of affection and belonging,” the Guangzhou University design student said in an interview with the South China Morning Post. “I like the traditional culture behind it.”
    Luo, a sop****re, now wears Hanfu once a week. He also joined the Hanfu Society at his school. Its members celebrate traditional Chinese festivals, clad in Hanfu, and go into the community to lecture about their garments.
    Luo is by no means alone in venerating traditional Chinese attire. An increasing number of Chinese argue that Hanfu, which characterised the Han ethnic group for more than three millennia, is worthy of far greater attention today – both at home and abroad.


    Luo said he feels “a strong sense of affection and belonging” when he wears Hanfu clothes. Photo: Luo Zhenchen
    After vanishing from history for about 400 years, the style has gained a substantial number of followers on the mainland in the past 15 years as the country attaches more importance to tradition and calls on the public to be proud of Chinese culture.
    Hanfu, Luo said, had a “more broad historical context” than he expected. He said he also admired the “historical origins and historical tales” in its components.
    Most Hanfu enthusiasts, like Luo and his peers at the university, reserve their outfits for traditional festivals; only a small proportion wear them every day.
    A university student recently made headlines on Chinese media for dressing in Hanfu for more than 300 days in a single year to promote the style and culture.
    To complement his traditional robe, Kang Wei, a commerce and management student at Southwest Petroleum University in Chengdu, Sichuan province, wore shoes made from black cloth and, on rainy days, carried an umbrella made from oil paper, Chengdu Business News reported.
    “I admire Kang’s courage to wear Hanfu every day,” Luo said. “This kind of dress is different from what people wear nowadays.”
    Gao Zhiluo, a photographer from Luoyang in central China’s Henan province, is another diehard Hanfu supporter. She has worn the apparel almost every day since 2014.


    Photographer Gao Zhiluo has been wearing Hanfu outfits almost every day since 2014. Photo: Gao Zhiluo

    She was drawn to the costume from childhood when she was learning to play the pipa, a four-stringed instrument sometimes called the Chinese lute.
    When she plays on stage she always dresses in Hanfu, which she described as “beautiful and comfortable to wear”.
    Her passion for Hanfu carries into her everyday life. Before she goes out with friends, she spends an hour selecting her clothes, making up, combing her hair and choosing shoes and a handbag.
    When she is out and about, she said people often misunderstand her. Lots of people stare, she said, and some mock her for wearing what they assume is a cosplay outfit. Others, with a nationalistic or patriotic bent, get annoyed because they think her traditional robes are Japanese or South Korean.
    “I’m never put off by what they think because I know I’ve done nothing wrong or broken any rules,” she said. “But I am sad that people have such a lack of awareness of Hanfu. They don’t know that this is what our Han ancestors wore for thousands of years.”


    Gao said that people often stare at her when she is out and about and some are even abusive, but she is “never put off by what they think”. By: Gao Zhiluo

    Hanfu is not without its controversy. It has been linked to nationalist movements and even some of its most ardent fans have rejected calls to elevate it to China’s national dress. These naysayers point to the potential conflict such a move could spark between China’s Han majority and its 55 ethnic minorities.
    Han people, who have made up the bulk of China’s population since ancient times, were forced to change their clothes to Manchu-style ones by the Manchu rulers of the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) in the mid 17th century. Many were killed for protesting the order.
    It is hard to estimate the number of people who wear Hanfu today. Clubs promoting the fashion have sprouted at every major university and that demand has led to the creation of hundreds of new clothing brands. Just 10 years ago, there was barely a handful.
    Most supporters say they wear the style to show their appreciation for Chinese culture or just for fashion, without caring about the Han nationalism publicised by some leaders of the Hanfu revitalisation movement more than a decade ago.


    Online broadcaster Wang Tingting said she prefers to see Hanfu as the traditional dress of the Han people, not as a fashion style that represents all Chinese. Photo: Wang Tingting

    To raise Hanfu’s profile, in 2015 some members of the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Congress proposed making it China’s national dress, while several deputies to the National People’s Congress suggested that the robes worn by university students and academics on the mainland should be designed in a Hanfu style.
    Not all Hanfu supporters endorse those suggestions, however. Wang Tingting, an online broadcaster from Chongqing in southwestern China, said she had been wearing Hanfu regularly for several years, but preferred to see it as the traditional dress of the Han people, not as a fashion style that represented all Chinese.
    “Making Hanfu China’s national dress could be misleading, as if it was promoting Han nationalism and that could lead to ethnic conflicts,” she said.


    Wang makes tea dressed in one of her silk outfits. She said she has been passionate about Hanfu for several years. Photo: Wang Tingting

    Luo shared Wang’s concerns, saying that it would be controversial to make Hanfu the national dress.
    Gao said she could not understand why it was necessary to have a national dress.
    “It’s just clothes,” she said. “Why bother to politicise it? “If Hanfu was our national dress, what would ethnic minorities think?”
    Li Bochun, director of the Chinese Culture Rejuvenation Research Institute said it was comforting to see so many young people being drawn to Hanfu, but thought it was probably inappropriate for daily use.
    “In this fast-paced society, is it realistic to wear it while riding a bicycle or scrambling to get on a bus or subway train?”
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    43,114

    Slightly OT

    OT because gis ain't kung fu.

    Denim Tops for Martial-Arts Athletes
    By Andrew Asch | Thursday, August 16, 2018



    Mike Dytri’s puffy, cauliflower ears are badges of honor he got after years of gaining expertise in the martial art of jiu-jitsu.

    He had the discipline to earn a black belt as well as the ambition to introduce a new look to the traditional, baggy, white top—or kimonos—used by jiu-jitsu practitioners. Instead of a plain white fabric, denim was his textile of choice in keeping with his denim and streetwear brand Ludwig Van.

    “They fit like an Armani suit. They were designed to fit in a tailored way, but it doesn’t take away from the performance aspect,” he said of the martial-arts wear from his newly minted Vanguard Kimono by Ludwig Van label.

    The limited-run kimonos are made in Los Angeles and have been sold at Dytri’s direct-sales channel at www.vanguardkimono.com.

    In September, the denim kimonos will be selling at United Arrows in Tokyo’s Shibuya district with the hope they will be snatched up by jiu-jitsu martial artists and people who spar at jiu-jitsu mixed-martial-arts studios.

    Vanguard might be one of the most expensive martial-arts tops produced, Dytri said. They retail for $500 and are made of dead-stock fabric from Cone Mills’ White Oak plant in Greensboro, N.C. Before closing in 2017, it produced high-end denim fabric.

    Dytri is a self-taught fashion designer who ran a streetwear brand called Subfreakie, which was sold in 2003 at an undisclosed price. Then he started denim and streetwear brand Ludwig Van, which has been placed at high-end retailers such as Barneys, he said.

    The brand does limited runs of jeans made of dead-stock fabrics such as high-end selvage denim and Vietnam War–era U.S. Army sleeping bags.

    The pants often feature details such as unique stitching and a label featuring the face of composer Ludwig van Beethoven sporting the bowler and makeup worn by actor Malcolm McDowell in the 1971 film “A Clockwork Orange.”

    Ludwig Van has produced collaboration lines with brands including Vans and G-Shock. Dytri said there are plans to produce more special projects for the label.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #59
    something loose

    not too tight


  15. #60
    I still have my high school shuai jiao clothes.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •