Page 5 of 9 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 61 to 75 of 131

Thread: Print publishing death watch

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    5,096
    Gene,
    If you get the word out on my fundraiser for blood cancers, then I'll happily drop the $$ for a KFM subscription. I'll even buy some loot off martialartsmart. I'm not even asking for a direct donation from KFM. Just some visibility, and maybe a sticky for my thread in the main section. Here's my link.

    http://pages.teamintraining.org/rm/dhmomu10/dethington

    Thanks!
    David
    The weakest of all weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
    ~ Mark Twain

    Everyone has a plan until they’ve been hit.
    ~ Joe Lewis

    A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
    ~ Author unknown

    "You don't feel lonely.Because you have a lively monkey"

    "Ninja can HURT the Spartan, but the Spartan can KILL the Ninja"

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN
    Posts
    543
    "The first stage is to get the Gang( hard, solid power). every movement should be done with full power and in hard way, also need to get the twisting and wrapping power, whole body's tendon and bones need to be stretched to get the Gang( hard) power. "
    -Bi Tianzou -

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    No bookstores means less newsstands...

    Drake, I'm not into stickies. Some of the other mods here are, but for me, if you can't keep your topic ttt, then it's not worth it. Besides, I have the announcements for all the commercial biz part. It's not that hard to ttt whatever you want to promote. Just bait uki and he'll help you.

    Laredo could be largest US city without bookstore
    By PAUL J. WEBER (AP) – 2 days ago

    LAREDO, Texas — The final chapter has been written for the lone bookstore on the streets of Laredo.

    With a population of nearly a quarter-million people, this city could soon be the largest in the nation without a single bookseller.

    The situation is so grim that schoolchildren have pleaded for a reprieve from next month's planned shutdown of the B. Dalton bookstore. After that, the nearest store will be 150 miles away in San Antonio.

    The B. Dalton store was never a community destination with comfy couches and an espresso bar, but its closing will create a literary void in a city with a high illiteracy rate. Industry analysts and book associations could not name a larger American city without a single bookseller.

    "Corporate America considers Laredo kind of the backwater," said the city's most prolific author, Jerry Thompson, a professor at Texas A&M University International who has written more than 20 books.

    Since the closing was announced, book lovers in Laredo have flocked to the small store located between City Trendz ("Laredo's No. 1 Underground Hip Hop Shop") and a store that offers $4 indoor go-kart rides to stock up on their favorite titles.

    Schoolchildren even wrote letters to the parent company, Barnes & Noble, begging for the store to stay open.

    "Without that store, my life would be so sad and boring," wrote a fifth-grader named Bryanna Salinas, who signed her name with a heart.

    The Laredo store is among 49 remaining B. Daltons nationwide that Barnes & Noble will close by next year.

    The company believes a bookstore is viable in Laredo and has identified a location for a large-format Barnes & Noble, but the space will not be available for at least 18 months, said David Deason, Barnes & Noble vice president of development.

    In the meantime, without a single independent bookseller, Laredo may be in a league of its own among big cities.

    Though an independent bookstore is the only one of its kind in Newark, N.J., a city of nearly 288,000, big chains are nearby in the suburbs or New York City. Laredo is surrounded by nothing more than rural ranching towns on its side of the border.

    "We suffer, but we don't suffer to the extent that a Laredo would," said Wilma Grey, director of the Newark Public Library.

    Some worry that the closing could send a message that books and reading are not priorities in Laredo, a hot, steamy city of 230,000 that is choked by smog from trucks lining up at the border, which is home to the nation's biggest entry point for trucks and trains.

    Nearly half of the population of Webb County, which includes Laredo, lacks basic literacy skills, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

    Fewer than 1 in 5 city residents has a college degree. And about 30 percent of the city lives below the poverty level, according to the 2000 census.

    Laredo residents can still purchase books online, but civic leaders fear that without a bookstore, many residents will not have the opportunity to buy books.

    Many also feel that the stigma of not having a bookstore hurts Laredo's reputation.

    Outsiders, even other Texans, do not always distinguish between "los dos Laredos," the relatively peaceful city in Texas, and Nuevo Laredo, across the border in Mexico, which has been wracked by drug-war violence.

    But some bookstore supporters are undaunted.

    Maria Soliz, Laredo Public Library director, is leading the charge to get a bookstore back. The city's library system was already planning to open two more branches over the next two years to meet demand. That's in addition to the two-story main library painted in bold, Mexican-inspired colors that serves about 400,000 visitors annually.

    "It's not reflective of the city that they're closing," Soliz said. "I know this city can support a bookstore."

    Deason said the Laredo store is profitable, but its profits are not significant when factoring in the expenses of running a chain that's being phased out.

    Some people also question the city's priorities. As Elaine Perry walked out of the bookstore earlier this month with a heavy bag of hardcovers, she criticized a recent proposal to build an indoor snow park.

    "A snowboarding park in Laredo," Perry said. "Have you ever heard of anything so stupid?"

    Bookstore customers tend to be well educated and to have disposable income, said Michael Norris, an analyst with Simba Information. But that demographic is hardly what makes or breaks the business, he said.

    A bookstore is "either the cultural center in its community, or it's a pile of books with a roof over it," Norris said.

    The B. Dalton in Laredo certainly skews toward the latter. It has narrow aisles, no coffee for sale and not a single chair to sit and read.

    City Trendz employee Seve Perez said much of the traffic at Mall del Norte comes from Mexico, both from Nuevo Laredo and deal-seeking shoppers bused in from the country's interior.

    Standing behind a rack of sale T-shirts that read "Save Texas Rap," the 66-year-old said his bookish daughters will be crushed when the bookstore leaves.

    Next door, Laredo resident Misti Saenz walked out of B. Dalton with a sack of nine romance novels for her teenage daughter. She was stocking up before the store closes Jan. 16.

    "It's going to be a total bummer," Saenz said. "It made me wish I had shopped there more."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    5,096
    Is that a no, or a side assault at Uki?
    The weakest of all weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
    ~ Mark Twain

    Everyone has a plan until they’ve been hit.
    ~ Joe Lewis

    A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
    ~ Author unknown

    "You don't feel lonely.Because you have a lively monkey"

    "Ninja can HURT the Spartan, but the Spartan can KILL the Ninja"

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    Not quite a death watch...

    ...a price increase watch.
    Some Publishers to Push Up Cover Prices in 2010
    Dec 14, 2009
    -By Lucia Moses

    mw/photos/stylus/118085-NewYorkerM.jpg
    Publishers may not have cracked the code on generating paid content from the Web, but several big titles are looking to wring more money from consumers the old-fashioned way: cover prices.

    Condé Nast is raising cover prices on The New Yorker, Golf Digest and Teen Vogue in 2010, having already done so at Vanity Fair, Bon Appétit, Condé Nast Traveler and Lucky this fall (click here for a chart of some titles who have already or are planning to raise their cover prices).

    Hearst is lifting the cover price of Good Housekeeping, Esquire and Veranda and is considering the same for Country Living and other titles. Wenner Media quietly raised prices on Men’s Journal and Rolling Stone in the fall. And Meredith is eyeing newsstand price increases at flagship Better Homes and Gardens and Ladies’ Home Journal, Family Circle and Traditional Home, while Rodale is looking at doing the same at its health/fitness titles.

    “It kind of depends on the brand,” said John McCarthy, senior vp, customer marketing at Rodale. “If we’re seeing natural demand, we have the opportunity to be more aggressive with pricing.”

    In other cases, publishers are passing on de facto price increases by cutting frequency and maintaining or raising subscription prices. Thus while Time Inc. is maintaining cover prices across its titles for 2010, Fortune subscribers will pay the same for seven fewer issues as the annual frequency drops to 18 from 25. Hearst’s Esquire and House Beautiful subscription prices will go up in 2010—Hearst didn’t say by how much—while the titles will publish one and two fewer issues, respectively.

    This could bode ill for some. John Harrington, editor of The New Single Copy, said his research shows that in the first half of ’09, when single-copy sales plummeted, the success rate of titles that raised cover price, and sold more units, fell by more than half. While in the past, single-copy buyers have accepted price increases, he said, “The sharp downturn in sales has changed the conventional wisdom.”

    However, buyers praised plans to increase cover prices, while pointing out that for the most part, those titles don’t have a big newsstand presence. “It’s probably a worthwhile test to see how elastic newsstand prices are, and it’s always a good sales story to tell,” said Barry Lowenthal, president, The Media Kitchen. “It plays into wantedness.”

    Scott Daly, executive vp, executive media director, Dentsu America, said that he would look favorably on publishers that attempt cover price increases. “Although I have seen research that supports an opposing point of view, I wholeheartedly believe that consumers who are willing to pay more for content they covet ultimately make better customers for my clients,” he said.

    Generally, publishers are being more timid than usual about price hikes, given shaky consumer confidence and a 12 percent drop in single-copy sales in the first half of ’09, when a wholesaler disruption caused many outlets to be without magazines for weeks.

    Stephanie Laco, senior vp, retail services at wholesaler giant Source Interlink, said she sees fewer publishers experimenting with price. “I think people are questioning whether the consumers are going to pay,” she said. Publishers selling at Walmart would need the retailer to approve price hikes, she added, a fact that “certainly has to be on the minds of publishers.”

    Observers predict that newsstand sales declines will narrow in second-half ’09 but still be down, around 5 percent to 7 percent.

    Even Rodale is predicting newsstand sales overall will decline slightly in the second half, some strong titles notwithstanding. “We’re hurting too,” McCarthy said. “If people are not going to stores as much, there are less eyeballs looking at your magazines.”
    Drake,
    I don't do stickies, but there are many ways to keep a thread ttt-ed that you can do yourself. If you want to support our forum, please do. If not, that's fine too. The forum is free to everyone.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    25% loss

    Consumer Magazine Ad Pages Tumble 25 Percent in 2009
    PIB: All 12 ad categories post full year declines; Q4 improvement seen.
    By Jason Fell
    01/12/2010

    To no one’s surprise, consumer magazines suffered a beating in 2009 in terms of advertising revenue. According to full-year results released today by the Magazine Publishers of America’s Publishers Information Bureau, ad pages for the year were down 25.6 percent while estimated revenues closed at $19.45 billion, a drop of 18.1 percent.

    Of all the magazines tracked by PIB, fewer than 20 showed ad page gains in 2009. The biggest winners were People Style Watch (up 24.4 percent), OK! (up 20.7) and Saveur (up 12.8).

    Of the 12 advertising categories tracked by PIB, all reported ad page losses for 2009—the biggest decliners being financial, insurance and real estate (-41.4 percent) and automotive (-40.5). Estimated revenues were down in all categories except for food and food products, which posted a slight 1.4 percent gain.

    Despite the grim outcome, PIB said the fourth quarter showed some signs of improvement. Ad pages during the period slipped 21.6 percent compared to the fourth quarter in 2008 while revenues dropped only 12.4 percent.

    “While marketers’ skittishness continued through the fourth quarter, magazine spending showed improvement compared to earlier in 2009,” MPA executive vice president/CEO Ellen Oppenheim said in the announcement. “Magazines experienced an uptick in food spending and relative improvement in other areas, especially in automotive.”
    If you follow the link, you'll notice that PIB lists full year-end results, title-by-title and that no martial arts magazines are included on that list. That's because we're all so niche. Niche mags are doing even worse.

    Subscribe. Subscribe in January 2010 and you'll get a free Jackie Chan THE SPY NEXT DOOR prize pack.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Augusta, GA
    Posts
    5,096
    I already said, Gene. If you sticky my post for my fundraiser, I'll subscribe. I don't want a Jackie Chan thingee.
    The weakest of all weak things is a virtue that has not been tested in the fire.
    ~ Mark Twain

    Everyone has a plan until they’ve been hit.
    ~ Joe Lewis

    A warrior may choose pacifism; others are condemned to it.
    ~ Author unknown

    "You don't feel lonely.Because you have a lively monkey"

    "Ninja can HURT the Spartan, but the Spartan can KILL the Ninja"

  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    If you follow the link, you'll notice that PIB lists full year-end results, title-by-title and that no martial arts magazines are included on that list. That's because we're all so niche. Niche mags are doing even worse.

    Subscribe. Subscribe in January 2010 and you'll get a free Jackie Chan THE SPY NEXT DOOR prize pack.
    You know what's odd is that from a marketing perspective- niche marketing is very lucrative. You can target your market and the cost of entry is usually a lot less. Heck- there are a lot of people out there that owe their fortunes to niche marketing through magazines. It's a sad world right now. One where it's going to get a lot more difficult to get rich.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    There's a distinction between niche marketing and niche print magazines now

    Niche marketing is still fine. In many ways, that's what this forum is all about. Niche print magazines are a different story entirely now.

    I've deleted the half of the article and the tables below. You'll have to follow the link if you're that interested.
    Not Yet At the Bottom
    An analysis of first-half 2009 circulation levels of audited consumer magazines reveals that the end of the circ decline is nowhere in sight.
    By Baird Davis
    Monday, January 4, 2010

    In the first half of 2009, paid and verified circulation of audited consumer magazines (this excludes titles whose circulation is derived primarily from “association” circ sources, e.g., AARP The Magazine) fell an unprecedented 6.3 percent from 273.8 million to 256.5 million. This is believed to be the steepest circulation level decline in more than 40 years. And there are no signs that consumer magazine circulation levels have bottomed out.

    To the contrary, there are strong indications that the deep circulation level hole the industry dug for itself, as it eagerly embraced the advertising-driven circ model philosophy, still has more subscription circ to discharge before it arrives at a more optimal circulation level.

    However, the steep circ declines reported in the first half of 2009 appear to be a kind of industry cathartic turning point—a moment in time when publishers finally seemed to realize the seriousness of the “over-circulated” condition they have built for themselves.

    In this article we’ll review some of the causal reasons for the steep circ level decline in the first half of this year, while discussing the six key circulation trends which point to the continued circ decline of audited consumer magazine circ levels.

    1. Newsstand Circ Continues to Dramatically Decline
    Newsstand circ fell from 45.5 million a year ago to 37.0 million in the current period—a staggering 18.7 percent decline of 8.5 million circ. As a result, newsstand circulation’s share of total verified/paid circulation fell to 14.4 percent. This compares to a 20.7 percent ratio just 8 years ago.

    TREND POINT: The continuing decline of newsstand sales and the drop in the newsstand circ share of total circulation are key indicators that the industry’s circ levels are not optimal.

    2. Number of Audited Consumer Titles Continue to Rapidly Decline
    Newsstand circ was a big contributor to the industry’s circ level decline, but the largest contributor was the loss of 69 titles that were discontinued or ceased being audited. The number of audited publications fell by 8.4 percent—from 545 titles a year ago to 499 in the first half of 2009. These discontinued titles accounted for 16.2 million circ. Twelve of these titles reported circ of more than 500,000 in the year previous. This group included; Cosmo Girl (1,400,000), Country Home (1,272,000), Domino (1,115,000), Blender (952,000), Vibe (876,000), Home (829,000), Hallmark Magazine (749,000), Figure (724,000), O at Home (704,000), PC Magazine (646,000), Electronic Gaming (603,000) and BestLife (508,000).

    The record title losses were only slightly mitigated by the addition of 23 titles to the auditing ranks. The newly audited titles added 5.1 million circ. However, these newly audited titles (Country, Reminisce, and Birds & Blooms) published by Reader’s Digest accounted for the majority (4.3 million) of the new circ. It should also be noted that these three titles are not newly launched publications, but rather are part of a cadre of unaudited titles Reader’s Digest purchased from Riemann several years ago. The other 20 newly audited titles all had relatively low circulation profiles—less than 150,000 circ.

    The net “lost” circulation (newly audited titles, less departing titles) was 11.1 million, which accounts for a major portion of the industry’s 17.3 million circ fall.

    *TREND POINT: The trend toward a reduced number of audited titles is likely to continue and it will help accelerate industry circ level declines.

    3. More Cautious Circ Level Management Leads to Lower Circ Levels
    In the first half of 2009 there were 183 publications that decreased circ five percent or more. This compares to 142 in the year previous and 101 two years ago. Partially offsetting these declines were a record low 41 publications that increased circ five percent or more versus 76 the year previous.

    In the first half of 2009 thirty-six publications reported circ decreases of 50,000 or more of which 19 reduced their circ 100,000 or more and six titles that reported drops of more than 200,000—U.S. News (462,000), National Geographic (353,000), TV Guide (339,000), Country Weekly (298,000), Reader’s Digest (289,000) and Playboy (248,000).

    There were only 16 titles increasing circ levels 50,000 or more in the first half of the year. This compares to 24 titles in this category a year ago. However, the paid circ increases for three of these titles—FamilyFun, Gamer Informer and Parenting—involved merely substituting analyzed non-paid circ with paid circ. Five of these titles (all relatively new titles) reported increases of more than 100,000—Women’s Health (338,000), People Stylewatch (188,000), Taste of Home (105,000), All You (104,000) and Everyday Food (102,000).
    In this period the net level impact of the big gainers and big losers produced an industry circ decline of 3.1 million.

    TREND POINT: The growing trend of more cautiously managing circ levels will continue to push publishers toward seeking more optimal circ levels.

    4. Announcements for More Discontinued Titles and More Circ Level Reductions Are Waiting in the Wings
    There are at least 11 audited titles, whose circ was reported in the first half of 2009, which will be discontinued by 2010. They include Gourmet, National Geographic Adventure, Nickelodeon, Metropolitan Home, Cookie, Fortune Small Business, Southern Accents, Giant, Modern Bride, Nick, Jr. and Fit Pregnancy Moms. Combined these titles reported 5.3 million circ in the first half.

    During the second half of this year five publications announced rate base/circ level reductions of 300,000 or more that will take effect in 2010. The effected titles include—Reader’s Digest (2.6 million), Newsweek (1.1 million), Playboy (900,000), Prevention (500,000) and Good Housekeeping (300,000). These reductions account for 5.4 million circ.

    In addition, a number of publications announced frequency reductions, including Fortune, Jet, Ladies Home Journal, Reader’s Digest and Playboy.

    TREND POINT: These announcements are likely to be a precursor of more title closings and circ level reductions to follow in the next year or two.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    Giant Robot looking for donations

    Giant Robot is the leading AmerAsian mag (talk about your niche marketing). I wrote a piece for Giant Robot about a decade ago. There's a youtube vid - follow the link.

    We Need You, Here's Why:

    THE MAGAZINE

    For more than 15 years, Giant Robot has been documenting, promoting, and growing Asian and Asian American popular culture. Although a lot has changed since 1994, and there’s more immediate access to interesting stuff from around the world than ever, most of it is still crap and Giant Robot is as relevant as ever. Not only do we share what we think is the most interesting, compelling, or just plain cool aspects of Asian pop culture, but we also shape it and affect how readers in America and other countries perceive Asian, Asian American, independent, and underdog culture. Our distinctive editorial voice and clear sense of purpose has earned a loyal readership that includes academics and punks; old-school Asian activists and new-school bloggers; art fans, moviegoers, music listeners, comic readers, and food fiends; and Asians and non-Asians alike.

    And as the publication has evolved into a glossy magazine with a dedicated national following (with international distribution as well), so has the company’s business model. The unprofitable process of magazine publishing was bolstered with a series of like-minded retail outlets. After offering mail order and online sales, we went on to open locations in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York City. Our galleries and shops have not only provided a means of support for a horde of up-and-coming artists and indie businesses, but led the way for a generation of boutique/art gallery hybrids.

    THE MOMENT

    While diversification allowed Giant Robot to escape the fate suffered by many of our indie publishing peers in the second half of the ‘00s, 2009 was brutal. In addition to several distributors cutting out small press or folding altogether, paper has become more expensive and postage has skyrocketed exponentially. And while there has also been the support of loyal advertisers, the middle class of supporters has dropped, creating peaks and valleys in income that force us to live issue to issue. Complicating matters, store revenues and art show sales have suffered along with the economy, depriving the magazine of resources that allowed it to operate freely and thrive without the benefit or constraints of being part of a large publishing house.

    Reducing pages, going from bimonthly to quarterly, or becoming an online entity are not options, and our editorial and production staff of two full-timers and two part-timers (intact since issue 18) is already as lean as can be.

    And so, we are taking a series of actions with the intention of not only outlasting the economic downturn but becoming an even tighter operation with an improved publication. These steps include improving the content, explore printing and distribution options, and evolving with technology. We are also seeking help from friends.

    THE MESSAGE

    Although the idea of a Giant Robot Foundation is not new (a non-tax-deductible donation form has been included with subscription renewal notices for years now), this particular online campaign is. We believe that there are multiple generations artists, designers, bands, filmmakers, and travelers, as well as fans, students, and supporters of interesting culture who believe in what we do and want Giant Robot magazine to continue on its path without sacrificing quality, quantity, or independence.

    We have done the math, and an infusion of $60,000 (hopefully more) will ensure another year of full, unfettered operation with no strings attached to a shifting media paradigm, advertising climate, sketchy distributors, and the economy—each of which we are not ignoring but addressing straight-on. In concert with the other measures (not to mention the realignment and recovery of our shops), we feel that Giant Robot’s future and its continuing impact of society will be secure.

    If you have been affected or inspired by Giant Robot—perhaps even featured in the pages of the magazine—please help however you can. All support, both through finances and spreading the word, will be appreciated and make a difference.
    I was just thinking about Eric and Martin because I heard they were at the Shinjuku screening earlier this week.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    Down goes the Daily Planet

    Someone better tell Clark Kent.
    Berkeley Daily Planet to end print, be Web only
    Matthai Kuruvila, Chronicle Staff Writer
    Friday, February 12, 2010

    The Berkeley Daily Planet, a weekly newspaper with an often-irascible and campaigning style that matches the city it covers, announced Thursday that it would become a more frequent Web-only publication but keep its sole reporter.

    Planet Editor Becky O'Malley, in her weekly column, explained the decision by citing the economy, pro-Israel "zealots," "city government's perpetual hostility to free newspaper racks," and the fact that its advocacy style isn't a natural fit for advertisers.

    The tipping point came a week ago, when the Planet discovered that its payroll preparation company had embezzled money and failed to pay the paper's taxes, O'Malley said.

    With "hundreds of thousands" of dollars in potential liabilities, O'Malley said she and her husband, Mike, could no longer afford to subsidize the paper, which had never made a profit in the seven years since they bought it for $15,000 from four Stanford business school graduates.

    "The payroll scam made us think we had to bite the bullet," O'Malley said.

    O'Malley's column, which says the paper has 40,000 readers, states the paper will publish through this month before reverting to the new Web-only format.

    The paper had been downsizing for a while. In October, the O'Malleys laid off two of their three reporters. The paper had been reduced to publishing weekly, despite its name.

    The paper was more than just a dutiful recorder of the machinations of government. It was a part of the political conversation, often taking a preservationist stance on issues like the proposed scaling up of the city's downtown.

    But the paper's most influential and controversial role may have been as a community forum. Its letters to the editors were often published unedited for language or length.

    Rob Wrenn, a neighborhood activist and former planning commissioner, said that although he is not a fan of the paper's journalism, the letters to the editor were important to the community.

    "They've provided an open forum for the expression of all viewpoints in the city," Wrenn said. "The fact that they print everything is a good thing."

    That wasn't so much the case when the paper, like the city's government, ventured into world events.

    An August 2006 opinion piece published by an Iranian student living in India blamed Jews for anti-Semitism, from 539 B.C. to the present. The piece triggered a wave of protest from local rabbis, elected officials, and columns in the SF Weekly and The Chronicle.

    Complaints from pro-Israel groups went well beyond that column, ultimately triggering a campaign against it. O'Malley said advertisers dropped by 60 percent, though she said it was impossible to discern how much of a role the recession played.

    John Gertz, editor of dpwatchdog.com, a self-described Daily Planet watchdog site, has referred to the paper as a haven for "jihadists," among other things. He said it was sad the Planet was closing because he wanted only to reform it.

    "Am I to blame?" he asked. "I'm only the messenger here."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  12. #72

    Interesting New Magazine Publishing Concept

    http://www.jpgmag.com/magazine

    In a nutshell - their completely user generated content, advertiser supported, and they only print on demand for people who want a hardcopy, otherwise it's a PDF download.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Fremont, CA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    44,474

    A brilliant message from Dorling Kindersley

    The Future of Publishing - created by DK (UK)

    I've always had the highest respect for DK.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  14. #74
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    east TX
    Posts
    405

    interesting...

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    The Future of Publishing - created by DK (UK)

    I've always had the highest respect for DK.
    That was well done Gene, thanks!
    .... Skip

  15. #75

    Death of the Liberal Class

    I think you'll find this interesting Gene: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYCvSntOI5s

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •