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Thread: Cannes

  1. #61
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    And the noms are...

    Eager to see Parasite. I enjoy Bong's work.

    Oscars: South Korea Selects ‘Parasite’ for International Feature Film Category
    8:39 PM PDT 8/21/2019 by Danny Kim


    Courtesy of TIFF
    'Parasite'

    Bong Joon-ho’s black comedy, which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival this year, follows a low-income family working their way into a rich family’s lives as household employees.

    South Korea has selected Bong Joon-ho's Parasite as its entry for the best international feature film category at the 2020 Oscars.

    Parasite won the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year. The genre-busting black comedy is Bong’s second shot at the Oscars after Mother was selected by the Korean Film Council (KOFIC) in 2006, but didn't make the final shortlist.

    The film follows unemployed driver Kim Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho), his wife, Choong Sook (Jang Hye-jin), and their college-age children as they struggle financially and aspire to live a rich life. Things look up for the Kim family when the children are hired as a tutor and art therapist to the rich Park family.

    "I believe a director’s job is to reflect the times he or she lives in," says Bong, pictured here on the set of 'Parasite.'

    A richly layered film touching on socioeconomic issues, The Hollywood Reporter's review described Parasite as "generally gripping and finely crafted, standing up well as Bong’s most mature state-of-the-nation statement since Memories of Murder in 2003."

    Parasite sold worldwide via CJ Entertainment and Neon and is scheduled for North America release on Oct. 11 in New York and Los Angeles ahead of the awards seasons.

    Despite its strong homegrown film industry and stellar names such a Lee Chang-Dong (Burning) and Park Chan-wook (The Handmaiden), South Korea has never won the international feature film category or made the final shortlist.

    An independent jury led by Kim Young-Jin, programming director at Jeonju International Film Festival (JIFF) picked Parasite from a short list of eight features to represent Korea in the Oscars race.

    After the successful opening in June, Parasite grossed over $71.3 million domestically and is the first Cannes-winning film that broke 10 million in ticket sales at the Korean box office, a symbolic figure in the country.

    The 92nd Academy Awards will be held Feb. 9, 2020.
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    Gene Ching
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  2. #62
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    Cannes

    Sylvester Stallone Talking With Robert Rodriguez About Bringing ‘Cobra’ Back to Life
    Published 1 week ago on September 16, 2019 By John Squires



    At the Cannes Film Festival earlier this year, Sylvester Stallone had announced early plans to revive the 1986 action film Cobra in the form of a “streaming TV series.” Stallone of course played Marion Cobretti in the R-rated movie, a tough-on-crime street cop who must protect the only surviving witness to a strange murderous cult with far reaching plans.

    In a new chat with Fandango while out promoting Rambo: Last Blood (arriving in theaters this Friday!), Stallone informs us that he’s actually developing the project with Robert Rodriguez!

    “I’m talking with Robert Rodriguez right now about Cobra, which looks like that could happen,” Stallone told the site.

    “It’s basically his baby now,” Stallone added, again noting that the idea is to turn Cobra into a TV series rather than bring the character back to life on the big screen.

    Fandango notes that the potential project could very well be for Rodriguez’s El Rey Network, which is merely an educated guess at this point – but probably a pretty good one.
    Just talks now, but y'all know my loyalty to El Rey.

    THREADS
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    Gene Ching
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  3. #63
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    President Spike

    Spike Lee to be first black head of Cannes film festival jury
    Issued on: 14/01/2020 - 05:42
    Modified: 14/01/2020 - 05:41


    Paris (AFP)

    American director Spike Lee was named president of this year's Cannes film festival jury on Tuesday, becoming the first black head of the panel.

    The maker of "Malcolm X" and "Do the Right Thing" is the first person of black African descent to preside at the world's biggest film festival, which is held in May on the French Riviera.

    Lee, 62, said he was "shocked, happy, surprised and proud all at the same time" to make history.

    The Cannes veteran has premiered seven of his films at the festival, with his debut movie "She's Gotta Have It" causing a sensation in 1986 when it won the youth prize at Directors' Fortnight.

    His appointment comes as activists criticised the Oscars on Monday for ignoring actors and directors of colour, with no nominations for the acclaimed performances of Awkwafina in the Chinese-American drama "The Farewell" and Lupita Nyong'o in the horror movie "Us".

    Lee -- who showed his last film "BlacKkKlansman" at Cannes two years ago -- said "my biggest blessings... have happened out of nowhere.

    "I'm honoured to be the first person of the African diaspora (USA) to be named president of the Cannes jury and of a main film festival."

    Lee will also be awarded a Palme d'Or, the festival's top award, for lifetime achievement.

    In a written statement from his home in "Da People's Republic Of Brooklyn, New York", Lee said Cannes had changed his life.

    "To me the Cannes film festival (besides being the most important film festival in the world -- no disrespect to anybody) has had a great impact on my film career.

    "You could easily say Cannes changed the trajectory of who I became in world cinema," he added.

    - Lack of diversity -

    Lee also thanked "the great people of France who have supported my film career throughout four decades. I will always treasure this special relationship."

    Only one Asian, the Hong Kong auteur Wong Kar-wai, has ever led the Cannes jury in its 73-year history.

    French actress Isabelle Adjani, whose father was Algerian, became the first person of African descent to lead the jury in 1997.

    The world's top film festivals have faced fierce criticism for their lack of diversity in recent years.

    Cannes and its rival Venice have faced growing scrutiny, particularly for the lack of female directors in their main competitions, even as they have chosen gender-balanced juries.

    More than 80 actresses and woman filmmakers led by then jury president Cate Blanchett staged a red carpet protest at Cannes for equality in the film industry in 2018.

    Lee was vocal in his support for the women at the time.

    "Spike Lee's perspective is more valuable than ever," festival director Thierry Fremaux said.

    "Cannes is a natural homeland and a global sounding board for those who awaken minds and question our stances and fixed ideas.

    "Lee's flamboyant personality is sure to shake things up," he added.

    Last year the jury was led by "Babel" and "The Revenant" director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, the first Mexican and only the second Latin American to preside over the festival.

    The winning film, Korean Bong Joon-ho's "Parasite", has since become a runaway hit, winning the Golden Globe for best foreign film and six Oscar nominations.
    Well played Cannes.

    I neglected to mention that Parasite won the Palme d'or.
    Gene Ching
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  4. #64
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    Cannes is still on for May 12–23

    Is Cannes Happening Despite Coronavirus? Festival President Says “Oui”
    The festival’s president is “reasonably optimistic” that the Covid-19 epidemic will hit its peak well before Cannes.
    BY YOHANA DESTA
    MARCH 11, 2020


    Pierre Lescure attends the Cannes official selection presentation at UGC Normandie in Paris on April 18, 2019.BY MARC PIASECKI/GETTY.

    The Cannes Film Festival is holding firm in the wake of coronavirus panic, despite the fact that France has one of the largest outbreaks of the disease in Europe—and, as a result, gatherings of more than 1,000 people have officially been banned in the country. Festival president Pierre Lescure told French outlet Le Figaro that Cannes is still going ahead as planned, though he added that if the situation gets worse, he will have no choice but to cancel the glitzy event.

    “We remain reasonably optimistic in the hope that the peak of the epidemic will be reached at the end of March and that we will breathe a little better in April,” he said. Lescure did, however, add this: “But we are not oblivious. If not, we will cancel.”

    The festival, which is set to take place May 12–23, would certainly break the threshold of the 1,000-person ban. An estimated 40,000 attended the 2019 festival, flying into the country from all around the world.

    There have been more than 1,600 reported cases of Covid-19 in France, the third-biggest outbreak in Europe following Italy and Spain. A reported 33 people have died. The outbreak has impacted several sports and entertainment events. Madonna canceled two shows scheduled for Paris this week, while the Louvre, which usually receives over 30,000 visitors per day, was temporarily closed for three days. The museum reopened after taking certain precautionary safety measures, such as limiting direct contact between employees and visitors purchasing tickets.

    In the Le Figaro interview, Lescure said that if Cannes must be canceled, the festival will be able to withstand the financial losses that will occur.

    “The endowment fund that we have set up allows us to face at least one year without revenue,” he said. That puts Cannes in a better position than Austin’s SXSW, which was canceled in the wake of the spreading virus and thus had to lay off one third of its full-time staffers.

    It was previously reported that Cannes did not have insurance, which could cause trouble if the festival were forced to cancel. Lescure cleared that up in the interview, saying that the fest was offered insurance “about 10 days ago, but it was totally disproportionate. We were only offered to cover ourselves up to $2.3 million, while our budget is $36 million. It was really peanuts. The company was clearly playing the bounty hunters, and we of course declined this proposal.”

    As of now, Cannes is slated to carry on as planned. This year’s jury president will be Oscar winner Spike Lee. Lescure also added, once again for good measure, that “we remain optimistic.”
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    Gene Ching
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  5. #65
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    bittersweet

    Oct 27, 2020 5:17pm PT
    In Cannes, a Bittersweet Mini-Festival Salutes the Past and Sets Out a Hopeful New Vision


    By Ben Croll


    Cannes 2020
    AP
    As the lights dimmed in the Grand Theatre Lumiere in Cannes on Tuesday evening, and the opening notes to Camille Saint-Saëns’ “The Carnival of Animals” echoed over the loudspeakers, one could almost imagine themselves back in the normal swing of things.

    In some respects, the opening night of the three-day ‘Special Cannes’ program felt very much like a return to halcyon days. Announced in late September, the mini-festival is intended to honor the Cannes 2020 selection with a showcase of four films that received the prestigious label, as well as the full Cinefondation lineup and a short film competition.

    At Tuesday’s opening screening of Emmanuel Courcol’s crowd-pleasing comedy drama “The Big Hit,” the security measures were more elaborate than ever; the state-of-the-art auditorium was at full capacity; and the screening was prefaced by a typically effusive introduction from Cannes delegate general Thierry Fremaux, among others.

    Only, the 1,000 attendees weren’t exactly back in the good old pre-pandemic days. Security measures dictated that every attendee keep their mask on throughout the film, with each filmgoer seated at least one seat apart from their neighbor on either side. This meant that ‘capacity’ was less than one half of what the 2,300-seat auditorium can otherwise allow.

    If the mood inside the theater was vibrant, Fremaux’s opening remarks were a reminder of the bittersweet circumstances that forced the Cannes Film Festival to claim this pop-up opportunity in the first place.

    “When we returned to this theater, where we had not stepped foot since May 2019, we all felt our hearts pinch,” said Fremaux, referencing the festival’s tough-but-inevitable decision to cancel its physical component this past summer. “[With this event], we wanted to light this screen up anew.”

    Fremaux’s remarks, and those of festival president Pierre Lescure and Cannes mayor David Lisnard, both looked back at the edition that never was, and forward to what the festival might look like in years to come.

    “In May, the [New York Times] wrote an article called ‘What Do We Lose When Cannes Is Canceled,’” Fremaux let out with an impish grin. “The article was so strong that we decided to cancel next year as well, because it seems we get better press when we don’t host a festival than when we do!”

    But in describing the pared-back program, which features the aforementioned “The Big Hit,” along with Naomi Kawase’s “True Mothers,” Dea Kulumbegashvili’s San Sebastian winner “Beginning,” and Bruno Podalydès’ “The French Tech,” Fremaux laid out a roadmap for how the festival perceives itself and how it might operate going forward.

    “We have two French films, and two international ones,” Fremaux began. “As well as two films directed by men and two directed by women. [That kind of parity is] something we will apply as much as possible. We will display those convictions.”

    In his remarks, Cannes mayor David Lisnard made the ongoing pandemic a focal point. “This edition incarnates this desire to come out of this stronger [than before], to fight and to overcome,” said Lisnard.

    Highlighting the “particularly draconian” security protocols — which include in-theater air purification, temperature controls and disinfection sprays upon entering the Palais des Festivals — Lisnard made implicit the municipal authority’s goal to see a successful physical iteration of the festival in 2021.

    “This is an exhortation,” said the mayor. “We need to make it understood that culture is a source of economic development, a source of social wealth, and a source of life…It’s a demonstration that we can and we should hold events while assuring the health and safety of all who attend. We will continue to fight to prove that we can do so.”

    And it goes without saying that when the festival makes its long-awaited return in 2021, many of these new measures will be here to stay.

    For the time being, however, attendees will have to cope with the more restrictive measures put in place by the French government in recent weeks. With COVID-19 cases on the rise and showing no signs of slowing within the days to come, national authorities instituted a countrywide 9 p.m. curfew on Oct. 24, and President Emmanuel Macron is widely expected to announce a new lockdown later this week.

    On the ground in Cannes, that means each screening must allow ample time for festivalgoers to get home or back to hotels before the clock strikes nine. When “The Big Hit” came to a close, drawing cheers and applause from the impassioned audience, the film’s cast and crew had just enough time to take the stage for a victory lap.

    At 8:20 p.m., the film’s director and stars stood onstage, enjoying their acclaim. But just five minutes later, Fremaux was urging attendees to file out quickly, reminding them to, “keep your masks on, wash your hands and get home before 9 p.m. to have a bowl of soup.”

    By 8:30 p.m. on the dot, the Grand Theatre Lumiere was empty.
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    Gene Ching
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