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  1. #346
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    Hugo Alfredo "Dinamita" Santillan

    woah. wth boxing?

    Santillan, 23, is second boxer to die this week
    7:54 AM PT
    ESPN

    Argentine boxer Hugo Alfredo "Dinamita" Santillan died Thursday in Buenos Aires of injuries suffered in the ring during Saturday's draw against Uruguayan fighter Eduardo Javier Abreu. He was 23.

    Dr. Graciela Olocco from Hospital Agudos San Felipe confirmed the death on Thursday morning to media outlets.

    Santillan underwent surgery for a clot in his brain and twice went into cardiorespiratory failure before he died of cardiac arrest at 12:35 a.m. local time Thursday, Olocco said.


    World Boxing Council

    @WBCBoxing
    RIP Hugo Santillan.

    He passed away from injuries suffered during Saturday’s fight which ended in a draw.

    We join Hugo’s family and friends in grief, support and wish prompt resignation.

    Via @marcosarienti



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    Russian boxer Maxim Dadashev died Tuesday after suffering a similar brain injury during Friday's fight in Maryland against Subriel Matias of Puerto Rico. He was 28.

    Santillan (19-6-2), a super lightweight, made his pro debut in 2015. Eight of his 19 victories came by knockout. He was the son of fighter Hugo Alfredo Santillan and was from the same region, Santa Fe, as Marcos Rene "Chino" Maidana.

    According to ringside reports, Santillan's nose began to bleed in the fourth round and, though he raised his arm in victory after the fight, he passed out as the judges were announcing the draw -- scored 95-95, 93-97 and 96-94 -- against Abreu (10-1-1).

    "Upon admission to the hospital, he had successive kidney failure and he did not come out of his coma," Olocco said. "He had swelling of his brain and he never recovered consciousness. The swelling continued to worsen, and it affected the functioning of the rest of his organs."
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  2. #347
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    Patricio Manuel

    The world's first transgender professional boxer is now the face of Everlast
    By Allen Kim, CNN
    Updated 3:00 PM ET, Fri September 27, 2019

    (CNN)Everlast, the leading brand in boxing, has chosen an unlikely athlete to be the new face of the brand.
    The company picked Patricio Manuel for its "Be First" campaign. Manuel is the first transgender boxer to compete professionally.
    As a woman, Manuel was a USA National Amateur Boxing Champion and was invited to compete in the 2012 Olympics trials.
    However, a shoulder injury during Olympic qualifying changed everything, Everlast said in a news release.
    While Manuel was recovering from the injury he decided to transition from female to male. It proved to be the toughest fight of his life.
    He was shunned and abandoned by his trainers and gym, and he had to fight the boxing commissions until they recognized regulations on transgender people in the sport, the news release said.


    Manuel had an uphill battle to fight to get back in the ring.

    Against all odds, Manuel fought his way back into the sport and became the first person to compete in a professional boxing match as a transgender fighter. On December 8, 2018, Manuel climbed into the ring against Hugo Aguilar at the Fantasy Spring Resort Casino in Indio, California, and came out a winner.
    The six-year journey proved to be worth the wait.
    "I'm incredibly honored to have been selected to tell my story in Everlast's Be First campaign," Manuel tells CNN. "Everlast is such a fixture in the sport and to have such an iconic athletic company recognize me as I am -- as a professional boxer who is transgender -- is a dream come true."
    There may be no other fighter who embodies the campaign's focus on challenging people to carve their own path to success better than Manuel, and he is paving the way for others to follow him.
    "At a time when transgender people are being questioned whether we have a place in the sporting world or even being recognized by the world at large, for Everlast to endorse me is huge," Manuel said. "It's a bold statement and I think it personifies the saying 'Be First.'"
    "I really hope it pushes other companies to think outside the box. This world is so incredibly diverse, we all deserve to have our identities and stories highlighted."
    Would it be inappropriate to say that this is a really ballsy move on the part of Everlast?

    Probably. It's so hard to stay PC nowadays.
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  3. #348
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    Patrick Day

    Boxer Patrick Day Dies From Traumatic Brain Injury Suffered in Super Welterweight Fight
    ALAA ABDELDAIEM 16 HOURS AGO


    © Jon Durr-USA TODAY Sports

    Patrick Day dies after suffering traumatic brain injury in welterweight fight

    Junior middleweight Patrick Day has died from injuries sustained in his 10th-round knockout in Chicago on Saturday night, the boxer’s management company, DiBella Entertainment, announced on Wednesday.

    According to the statement, Day succumbed to the traumatic brain injury he suffered in his title bout loss to defending champion Charles Conwell. He was surrounded by his family, close friends and members of his boxing team at the time of his death.

    "On behalf of Patrick's family, team, and those closest to him, we are grateful for the prayers, expressions of support and outpouring of love for Pat that have been so obvious since his injury," the statement read.

    Day, 27, fell to the canvas on Saturday after falling under a barrage of punches in the 10th and final round. Day was treated by a doctor in the ring and then was rushed off on a stretcher by paramedics and transported to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, where he underwent emergency brain surgery and fell into a coma shortly afterward.

    As of Sunday evening, Day was still in a coma and was in “extremely critical condition,” per DiBella Entertainment.

    In an emotional open letter to Day on Monday, Conwell said he had replayed the fight "over and over in my head" and was riddled with feelings of guilt and regret over the outcome.

    "If I could take it all back I would. No one deserves for this to happen to them," Conwell wrote in the post. "I prayed for you so many times and shedded so many tears because I couldn't even imagine how my family and friends would feel."

    DiBella Entertainment added that Day's death made it "very difficult to explain away or justify the dangers of boxing at a time like this."

    "This is not a time where edicts or pronouncements are appropriate, or the answers are readily available. It is, however, a time for a call to action," the team said. "While we don't have the answers, we certainly know many of the questions, have the means to answer them, and have the opportunity to respond responsibly and accordingly and make boxing safer for all who participate. This is a way we can honor the legacy of Pat Day. Many people live much longer than Patrick's 27 years, wondering if they made a difference or positively affected their world. This was not the case for Patrick Day when he left us. Rest in peace and power, Pat, with the angels."
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  4. #349
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    Claressa Shields


    Plant-Based Boxer, GWOAT, Wins Fight for Double Championship, Gender Equality
    Hailey Welch Published: March 5, 2021
    @claressashields
    This story was updated Saturday, March 6th, 2021.

    Last night Claressa Shields won the right to call herself GWOAT, Greatest Woman of All Time, becoming the first fighter, man or woman, to win an undisputed championship in two weight classes, by beating contender Marie-Eve Dicaire, for the title of World Champion, Junior Middleweight Division. Shields was already the reigning titleholder in the Middleweight division, and now she can wear her GWOAT ring with pride.

    An outspoken advocate of equal pay and gender equality in the sport of boxing, and in every arena, Shields is putting her hard work and right cross hook where her mouth is, by drawing an ever-growing number of fans to the still mainstreaming sport of female boxing. She is also taking the gloves off to compete in mixed martial arts, and we can expect to hear more from her in the future. already the only boxer, man or woman to ever win two back-to-back Olympic Gold Medals, Shields' star is on the rise.

    On March 5th Sheilds entered the ring n her hometown of Flint Michigan for her first-ever home-town bout, to show that: 1. Plant-based athletes kick-ass and 2. Equality for women all over the world still has a long way to go. (Perhaps not in that order.) The fight was dedicated to raising awareness for women's equality and pay equity in advance if International Women's Day, which is Monday, March 8th.

    Equality, Pay Equity, and Fighting for What's Right

    Shields is a great ambassador for both causes since she has been fighting and winning since she was 17 when she won her first Olympic Gold Medal in 2012 in London, England. Never count a vegan or plant-based athlete out. Novak Djokovic just won his ninth grand slam, at the Australian Open, on a plant-based diet. Tom Brady just won his seventh Superbowl Ring on a mostly plant-based diet. World Class Champion Surfer Tia Blanco wins her meets on a plant-based diet, and next, Claressa Shields is going to show that she can prevail, be her strongest and perform at the highest levels of her sport, on a plant-based diet of vegetables, fruit, legumes, nuts, and seeds.

    Most athletes who have ditched meat and dairy said they do it to lower inflammation in the body, which helps their circulation, oxygen uptake, endurance, strength, and injury prevention. All of them say it helps with faster recovery times so they can go crush it again the next day, without a "down day" between sessions.

    Shields took on Marie-Eve Dicaire in one of the most important matches of her career. The event was held at the Dort Financial Center in Flint, on March 5 at 9 pm. The fight was sponsored by Vejii, the new vegan online market where you buy everything you want for a plant-based diet in one place.

    "It just don't feel real to say undisputed twice," Shields told reporters, according to DAZN News, after adding the undisputed Junior Middleweight crown to the undisputed Middleweight title that she already owned. "It's kind of weird. It's like some epic s—t."

    Her one goal that remained unachieved: She wanted the K.O. she told reporters. "I was trying to get the knockout," Shields said. "That's what I really wanted. I'm happy, but I still wanted the KO. I just didn't have enough time."

    DAZN reported the reigning champ ended the press interview with: "Pacquiao who? Canelo who? It's Claressa Shields, yes!" She was referring of course to Manny Pacquiao, the much-decorated Filipino boxer, now a Senator in the Philippines, and "Canelo" Álvarez, the Mexican pro boxer who has won multiple world championships. "Two-time undisputed. When someone else does it, let me know! It ain't been done. It's just me."

    Shields comes from a family of boxers and won her first Olympic Gold at age 17
    Shields was a decorated amateur boxing career, winning her first Olympic gold medal at 17 in 2012. She turned pro after defending her middleweight gold medal in Rio in 2016, she turned professional. In addition to her two Olympic gold medals, she has won nine world championship belts in the sport. Shields, 25, is the defending WBC and WBO light-middleweight champion. In her fight with Dicaire, she’ll put those belts on the line.

    “I think it brings a lot more power, a lot more experience. I really think that I’m not just into only boxing. I’m a lot stronger at places where I really had strength at before. So I’m really excited about March 5th and bringing some of that to the table.”

    Shields certainly has every right to be "super excited" about this bucket list event, since she grew up not too far from the arena, and learned to love the sport of boxing through her father Bo, a former boxer. “I really started boxing for my dad so that he can live his life through me,” she said. “And I didn't know that boxing was destined for what I would do. I just did it because I wanted to make my dad happy," she also told Team USA.

    Claressa Shields Fights For Equality
    For Sheilds, there's only one perfect time to do what she loves, but since March is Women's History Month and International Women's Day is celebrated on the 8th, this fight, in particular, is destined to be the moment to prove everything she believes: "We're as great as the men."

    In an interview with Fox Business, Shields pointed out that women don't get as much money as men in many sports but specifically in boxing because women are held at a maximum of 10 rounds whereas men can fight for 12 rounds, but she would be willing to compete for the entire round if they let her. Men and women deserve equal pay, and we are here to stay," she said.

    “I have been very vocal about (women’s sports) but after being vocal now you have to take action. And right here is taking action,” Shields said. “Not being given chances by networks that don’t want to pay us what we want or need to be paid. … This is where it all starts. And to me, this is taking a stand for equal pay and equal fight time.”
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  5. #350
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    Heather Hardy

    Interview
    Heather Hardy: ‘I was a world champion and I couldn’t use boxing as my full-time job’

    Tess Crain

    Former WBO featherweight champion Heather Hardy has won 22 of her 23 professional bouts. Photograph: Tim Knox/The Guardian
    The single mom from Brooklyn who became world featherweight champion and one of NYC’s most popular fighters opens up about her feminist roots, the fight for gender equity and life after boxing

    Thu 13 May 2021 04.30 EDT

    Heather Hardy has experienced it all during her time as a professional fighter. A single mom and feminist who didn’t start boxing until well into her twenties, the Brooklyn native came up through the crucible of New York City’s club scene before finally winning the World Boxing Organization featherweight title in 2018.

    Now 39, Hardy is up against a challenge she’s yet to confront in her decade-long career: bouncing back from defeat. Twenty months after suffering her first professional loss and ceding her title to fellow Brooklynite Amanda Serrano at Madison Square Garden, Hardy will climb into the ring with Montreal’s Jessica Camara in an eight-round lightweight bout at the top of Broadway Boxing’s inaugural Ladies Fight card – a new all-female boxing series streaming on UFC Fight Pass that promoter Lou DiBella has launched to keep veteran contenders busy and elevate up-and-coming prospects.

    It’s just the kind of platform that might have made things easier for Hardy during her early years. But her main preoccupation in the days before Friday’s fight is the jump in weight: a two-division leap from her 126lbs comfort zone to the 135lbs realm. “[Camara] is a natural lightweight,” Hardy told the Guardian this week. “I expect that she’s going to be strong.”

    The move up for Hardy is born of necessity, the reason all too familiar to some: “During Covid and the shutdowns, I was working full-time and not training. So not only did I have to get back in boxing shape, I had to get back in actual shape and I just thought 126 would kill me.”

    Early in 2020, as she strategized her next move after her career-first loss, the world closed down. Then came a phone call from DiBella, the promoter who first spotted Hardy’s potential and signed her only six fights into her pro career as his company’s first female fighter.

    “He said, ‘If you need help financially, call me, but do not expect a boxing paycheck in 2020,” Hardy recalls. “Do what you gotta do to put food on the table and pay your bills.’ So I just got out of the gym. I said, ‘No more training. This is regular Heather and survival mode.’”

    A year later, having been vaccinated, returned to the gym, and spent the spring preparing for Friday’s bout, Hardy’s fitness and readiness belie the difficult road in her rear view: “I hit my fight weight today. I literally stood on the scale and I cried. I gained nearly 30lbs in Covid. I didn’t think I could do it. I was just like, I’m going to frigging do this. And I did. So standing on that scale today and seeing that 137-point-whatever, it was just the most gratifying feeling.”

    If Hardy is not the face of women’s boxing in the United States, she is at least, along with Serrano, its most recognizable face in its biggest city, which remains the sport’s spiritual home. That distinction didn’t come easy. The road to winning the WBO belt in a successful 2018 rematch against Shelly Vincent was paved with years of fights for paltry purses before scattered crowds at BB Kings Blues Club, the Aviator Sports Complex, the since-razed Roseland Ballroom and the many other club venues that pepper the New York City boxing scene.

    But for Hardy, boxing has never been just about belts. Her name has become embedded in the discourse around women’s boxing, particularly regarding gender parity. Independent filmmaker Natasha Verma even made her the centerpiece – and namesake – of her 2013 documentary that examined the male-female wage gap in boxing.

    Growing up, Hardy felt “strangely drawn” to activists like Billie Jean King and Gloria Steinem: “I always felt like I was born in the wrong era. I should have been marching for women’s rights in the seventies.” So when she started boxing in 2010 before turning pro less than two years later, she found it difficult to ignore the flagrant discrepancies in treatment – both quantifiable and existential – between male and female fighters. Hardy recalls earning $7,500 to defend a WBC international title when the male boxer with similar credentials entering the ring directly after her netted a purse in the high six figures. “I was a world champion and I couldn’t use boxing as my full-time job,” she says.


    Heather Hardy, right, suffered the first and only defeat of her professional career to fellow Brooklyn native Amanda Serrano at Madison Square Garden in September 2019. Photograph: Frank Franklin II/AP
    Recounting the early days of her career, Hardy describes a disempowering, extortionate landscape. “There’s only room for one at a time. For one Ronda Rousey. One female in each important seat. So no matter how bad that female gets treated, she never wants to speak up because there’s a line of girls waiting for that spot who would gladly take it for less pay or less acknowledgement.”

    Not Hardy, however: “As a feminist, as a girl mom, not only did I want to win world titles, but I wanted to make noise.”

    Amidst the upward sweep of her career, she realized the implied authority of drawing crowds and filling seats. “People want to see me?” she says. “Hey, maybe I’m not lucky I’m here. Maybe I deserve to be here. And I deserve a little bit more. That kind of gave more power to the things I had to say about what was going on.”

    Asked whether she thinks paid a price for her salience and integrity, she hesitates for a beat.

    “When you speak out against inequity in any sense, whether it’s gender, race, religion, you’re seen as a whining, complaining female,” Hardy says. “It’s just a stigma that gets attached to you. I’m sure there are tons of people out there who don’t want to deal with me or don’t want to do business with me. But I just don’t care.”

    In recent years, boxing has made demonstrable strides toward equity, for which Hardy credits two core factors. First, the introduction of women’s boxing to the Olympics, in 2012, which offered the chance for acclaim on a world stage: “I came from Gleason’s Gym, which has a long line of female champions, female road warriors who traveled around to fight because there was nothing here.”

    Second, Hardy cites changes in how we consume content: “Ten years ago, we didn’t have UFC Fight Pass. There were no streaming services. There was no Dazn. If you weren’t at my fight, you couldn’t watch it.”

    As in other sports, visibility matters: if fans haven’t seen women fight, they’re less likely to believe women can fight.

    Still, while she sees progress, to Hardy, boxing remains “a boys’ game” – particularly in contrast with mixed martial arts, which offers female fighters “more publicity, more money, more recognition, more media attention.” As one of the early female boxers to seek greener pastures (and purses) in the MMA world, Hardy knows firsthand that, between the two combat sports, the industry support for women is “apples and oranges, night and day”.

    As she approaches her 40th birthday in January, Hardy knows the obvious question. “People ask me, would you be OK to retire?” Even a fighter who’s headlined cards, performed before sold-out crowds, and won a world title at Madison Square Garden is not impervious to life’s punishing vicissitudes. “If you survived 2020, and you’re not in a mile of debt, you figured it out. I’m convinced there’s nothing I can’t figure out.”

    She views Friday’s bout against Camara in the Nashville suburb of Murfreesboro as a kind of litmus test for her career.

    “My goal is to hit weight, that’s number one,” Hardy says. “Number two, win that fight. Number three, I’m going to Jamaica for a week. I’m going to sit on the beach, I’m going to sip a martini. And I’m going to see if these last three months of my life were worth it. Because the fans, everybody only sees those eight rounds. They don’t see the jogs in the plastic suit. They don’t see shuffling clients. They don’t see homeschooling your 11th-grader, they don’t see SAT scores. That’s the kind of thing that I have to decide. Am I willing to sacrifice my body, my mental health, my everything for what comes next.”

    Still, Hardy feels prepared and excited: “I can tell you that my fight camp went unbelievably smooth.” As for Camara, “She could be bigger than me, but I feel really good.”

    It’s tough to imagine a fighter with Hardy’s spirit walking away after a comeback. But there’s also the chance we’ll simply see a different side of her. Despite an earned skepticism for the business of boxing, Hardy loves two things about the sport itself.

    “I love my role in boxing, which is fighting,” she says. “I don’t know that I’d ever want to really take on any other position outside of fighter – except for maybe commentator because, you know, I do love to talk.”

    Given the urgency of her message and passion of her convictions, one can believe that even when she finally hangs up her gloves, Heather Hardy won’t stop speaking up any time soon.
    Becoming a pro athlete is incredibly hard, even harder for less spotlighted sports.
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  6. #351
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    Streaming schedules on NBC

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  7. #352
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    Aidan Walsh

    Yahoo Sports
    Irish boxer Aidan Walsh out of Olympics after he injured ankle celebrating win
    Ryan Young·Writer
    Sat, July 31, 2021, 8:44 PM·1 min read
    Irish boxer Aidan Walsh has withdrawn from his semifinal bout in Tokyo after he injured his ankle celebrating.

    Walsh didn’t attend the medical check and weigh-in for his fight against Great Britain’s Pat McCormack on Sunday, according to The Associated Press. His absence means that McCormack will advance to the gold medal welterweight fight.

    Walsh will still win a bronze medal. McCormack will now take on either Cuba’s Roniel Iglesias or Russia’s Andrei Zamkovoy in the gold medal fight.

    “What Aidan did this week is an incredible achievement,” Ireland boxing team leader Bernard Dunne said, via The Associated Press. “His performance throughout the tournament has been outstanding, and it is great to see him write his name in the annals of Irish sport.”

    Walsh hurt his ankle celebrating QF win

    Walsh reached the semifinal match after beating Mauritius’ Merven Clair in the quarterfinals. After he was given the win, though, Walsh started a wild celebration.

    He jumped up and down multiple times and then landed awkwardly on his ankle.

    He was later seen leaving the arena in a wheelchair.

    The Irish team said that Walsh injured his ankle, but only said that he did so during the fight. His ankle wasn’t an issue until after his win.

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