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Thread: Busted TCM practitioners

  1. #31
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    Acupuncture clinic BAWDY HOUSE!

    Acupuncture clinic in Surrey shut down for allegedly selling sex
    By Elaine O'Connor, The Province November 2, 2012

    A Surrey acupuncturist has earned a pointed rebuke for allegedly running a bawdy house out of his acupuncture clinic.

    John Hong Zou Zhang was found guilty of professional misconduct, banned from practising for three years and fined $21,500 last week by the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of B.C.

    Zhang has been suspended from practising since January 2011, and his suspension will now continue until 2014, the College’s disciplinary committee ruled on Oct. 26.

    The acupuncturist ran the former Hua Xia Traditional Chinese Medicine clinic in the 10100-block King George Boulevard, as well as a practice in Vancouver.

    “It’s very upsetting to our practitioners,” College registrar Mary Watterson said Thursday.

    “Most of our practitioners are dedicated health professionals and this sort of thing is abhorrent to them,” she said. “That’s why we are here, we want to make sure that this isn’t happening.”

    The College began investigating Zhang on Jan. 11, 2011, responding to allegations he was offering the services of prostitutes at his clinic.

    Their information was provided by Surrey bylaw officials who, together with Surrey RCMP, had been conducting surveillance on the clinic between October and December 2010. The city subsequently revoked his business licence.

    Zhang was never criminally charged.

    Surrey RCMP Sgt. Drew Grainger was involved in the surveillance operation at the time and said that investigators had even walked in on sexual activity taking place. He said the police decided to shut the business down using municipal bylaws instead of operating under the Criminal Code in order to act quickly.

    “At the end of the day, the goal was to shut this business down to protect the public interest,” he said.

    The officer added that massage parlours were often fronts for prostitution, but that “traditional medicine is a new spin on it.”

    Watterson said the College regularly monitors websites and newspaper ads to see if any clinics are running such side businesses.

    At the time of the investigation, the College stated that Zhang’s licence to practise was suspended pending the outcome as “allegations that the Registrant was illegally selling sexual services at his clinic raise serious safety concerns for patients of the clinic and members of the general public”

    During the disciplinary hearings, two male customers testified that they had bought sexual services at the clinic.

    A Surrey bylaw officer testified that their surveillance revealed boxes of condoms and opened wrappers, signs depicting sexual activities and a scantily clad female at the clinic.

    Zhang can apply to practise again once his suspension ends but must agree to conditions on his practice, such as regular checks.

    It is not the first time the College has had to discipline members for sexual offences. There have been several cases this year alone.

    In February, the college found acupuncturist Zhi Li guilty of sexual misconduct for making sexual comments and touching a female patient, despite being warned earlier to have a female staff member present at all times. His licence was suspended until January 2013 and he was fined $7,400.

    In April, the college disciplined Ke Qiang Cen, the owner of KK Acupuncture Clinic in Richmond, for also allegedly operating the business as a bawdy house, offering “happy endings” or prostate massages to clients, among other allegations. He was reprimanded for professional misconduct and fined $5,000, among other penalties.

    And in June, Christopher Daniel Gerow, a traditional Chinese medicine practitioner in Comox, was suspended from practice pending the outcome of an RCMP investigation into allegations of sexual touching from two female patients.
    What is the Chinese term for prostate massages? Some one here has got to know. Dale?
    Gene Ching
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  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    What is the Chinese term for prostate massages? Some one here has got to know. Dale?
    I think his comment about how his "door is always open" refers to something else...

    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    their surveillance revealed boxes of condoms and opened wrappers, signs depicting sexual activities and a scantily clad female at the clinic.
    that's almost Pythonesque in it's phrasing - so, when they say signs depicting sexual activity, do they mean like this?


  3. #33
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    I have no idea how to say prostate massage and have NO desire to learn.

    nasty bad people pimping out TCM for the sex.
    Mouth Boxers have not the testicular nor the spinal fortitude to be known.
    Hence they hide rather than be known as adults.

  4. #34
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    busted for a fungus that grows on a kind of caterpillar

    I know, I know, most likely cordyceps, but it sure sounds funny taken out of context.
    TCM thief sentenced to 10 years
    Global Times | 2012-11-20 23:30:06
    By Lu Chen

    A 26-year-old Shanxi Province man was sentenced to 10 years in prison and fined 10,000 yuan ($1,603.68) for stealing 1.44 million yuan worth of a rare type of traditional Chinese medicine, a local court announced Tuesday.

    The defendant, surnamed Xue, stole more than 5,000 grams of the medicine, a fungus that grows on a kind of caterpillar, after he broke into a drug store in Pudong New Area on May 24, according to a press release from Shanghai Pudong New Area People's Court. He then fled to Beijing.

    "The drug store does not have guards on duty at night and the valuable fungus had not been put away in a special refrigerator like usual. All of this made it easier for Xue to steal it, said Fu Xinzhen, a press officer with Shanghai Pudong New Area People's Court.

    Beijing police discovered 4,313 grams of the fungus at his home in the capital when they arrested him later that month.

    The fungus, which is used to treat cancer and bolster a patient's constitution, only grows in high altitudes such as the plateaus of Sichuan, Yunnan and Qinghai provinces, as well as the Tibet Autonomous Region. The fungus is expensive because it is scarce and difficult to produce.

    Xue earned 85,000 yuan selling a portion of the fungus he stole. He returned the rest to the drug store after he was caught, according to the court. He also confessed to breaking into three stores in Beijing and stealing more than 20,000 yuan worth of goods.
    Gene Ching
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  5. #35
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    Slightly OT...

    ....and completely ghastly.

    Female doctor axed to death in Chinese hospital
    A female doctor has been axed to death by a patient in the northern Chinese city of Tianjin in the latest act of violence in the country's hospitals.
    By Malcolm Moore, Beijing
    12:59PM GMT 29 Nov 2012

    Kang Hongqian, 47, was attacked and killed in her clinic on the second floor of the No 1 Hospital, which is affiliated to the Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Ms Kang was the head of the hospital's acupuncture department and on duty at the time. Her murder is one of a wave of thousands of attacks in recent years by patients who are frustrated at China's health care system.

    There was no clear motive for the attack, and the assailant, who has not been named, jumped out of a window afterwards, injuring himself seriously.

    Wang Hongdong, the hospital's chief spokesman, said the man had smuggled in the axe after lunch, when security guards and doctors were on a break. He added that the hospital had increased its security this year, in line with new directives from the health ministry.

    "He arrived around 1pm and some people saw him, but thought he was a patient. He came straight to the second floor and he looked perfectly normal all the way.

    "He has been treated at the psychiatric department of the hospital before and is suffering from depression. He has also been treated at the acupuncture department twice and has never complained to the hospital before."

    Mr Wang said he did not think the attack was driven by revenge. "Dr Kang has always had a good reputation with her patients. She had breast cancer last year and had just come back from a course of chemotherapy."

    He added that the man had been taken to another hospital for emergency treatment after his jump and is now in a stable condition.

    Despite an injection of more than £150 billion into the Chinese health system in the past three years, the frustration of Chinese patients is growing rapidly.

    Doctors are underpaid and overworked and rely on selling medicine or extra fees in order to make money. Patients are charged high prices for treatment in what is supposed to be a public health care system.

    In July, 17-year-old Li Mengnan was convicted of murder after stabbing four hospital staff to death in a hospital in Harbin. However, he received a surprising amount of public support for his drastic act, with two-thirds of respondents to a poll on the People's Daily website sympathising with him.

    In 2010, there were more than 17,000 "incidents" aimed at hospital staff, up from 10,000 five years earlier and the Lancet, a medical journal, has pronounced that "China's doctors are in crisis".

    A letter to the journal from a Chinese medical student, Li Jie, said "the deteriorating relationship between doctors and patients has turned medical practice in China into a high-risk job".

    In September 2011, a 54-year-old cancer patient stabbed a doctor 17 times after an argument. In April this year, Chen Yuna, a doctor in Hunan province was stabbed 28 times in the neck, chest and stomach by Wang Yunsheng, a 25-year-old migrant worker with drug-resistant tuberculosis
    Gene Ching
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  6. #36
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    It seems like acts of frustration and anger and pain, they ( the patients) are just acting out on the wrong people.
    Psalms 144:1
    Praise be my Lord my Rock,
    He trains my hands for war, my fingers for battle !

  7. #37
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    Slightly OT...

    There's legal action with this school, so it's sort of like been busted.

    Victoria’s oldest school of traditional Chinese medicine closes its doors
    Katherine Dedyna / Times Colonist January 11, 2013


    The Canadian College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine was housed in this building at Chatham and Government streets. Photograph by: ADRIAN LAM, Times Colonist

    The doors of Victoria’s oldest school of traditional Chinese medicine have closed, and after more than a year, there are no plans to reopen them.

    Legal machinations continue between the former principal of the Canadian College of Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine and the former board of the college’s operator, the East West Medical Society; the building that housed it is the subject of a court-ordered sale.

    The college, which was among the oldest in Canada, operated for nearly 30 years, and moved in 2002 to Chatham and Government streets, where the building is listed for sale at $1.495 million. (That’s down from $1.7 million last March, said real estate agent Griff Lewis of DTZ Barnicke, who is handling the sale on behalf of the receiver.)

    The B.C. Supreme Court ordered the sale and receiver Marty Eakins of Hayes McNeill & Partners Ltd. said he was unable to discuss the issue because of ongoing litigation.

    SUIT, COUNTERSUIT

    Former principal Dr. Xiaochuan Pan said he rescued the college from financial failure, but has paid a steep price for his efforts.

    Pan, 55, who operates his own clinic of traditional Chinese medicine on Government Street, is suing the East West Medical Society for $386,717 for loans and other money advanced to the school between 2004 and 2009. In a countersuit filed with the B.C. Supreme Court, the society denies owing any money to Pan and asks for damages.

    Pan said he injected major money into the society’s account — staving off bankruptcy — in 2004 and did not draw a salary for five years as principal. In return, he said, there was an agreement that he would be able to buy the building and the school at a favourable price down the road.

    The lawsuits and countersuits are complex enough to have generated “thousands of pages” of disclosures by both sides, said lawyer Sinclair Mar, who is representing Pan.

    STUDENTS ‘;FREAKED’

    The college closed suddenly in May 2011, sending students and teachers into a panic, recalled Sherry Gaudet. Like most students, she was placed at another local school. Thanks to tuition coverage from the Private Career Training Institutions Agency of B.C. — a Crown corporation that regulates private colleges — few lost time or money.

    Still, “everyone was freaked, sad and angry,” Gaudet said.

    Seven students made claims for compensation to continue their education elsewhere, for a total of just under $20,000, said agency registrar Karin Kirkpatrick.

    “At the time of closure, the school had refund cheques prepared for students but could not deliver them as they had been served with a court order for preservation of all assets by Dr. Pan’s lawyer, so we ended paying out of the [agency] fund instead,” Kirkpatrick said in an email to the Times Colonist.

    LEGAL FIGHTS GO ON

    In January 2010, Pan sued the East West Medical Society, one of its directors and a former director for inducing breach of contract.

    In its statement of defence, the East West Medical Society argued that Pan repudiated the contract made in 2004 by requesting to purchase only the property and not the college. Pan “declined to receive compensation of any type whatsoever” when it tried to pay him a salary, the society said, and it denies any unjust enrichment due to its relationship with him.

    Further, in a counterclaim, the society claims Pan was suspended as college principal for cause on Dec. 16, 2009, citing breach of his financial duties, significant overcharges for herbal medicines he supplied and frustrating the society’s attempt to refinance operations with the Royal Bank of Canada.

    Pan counterclaimed that if the society suffered any damages or losses, it was its own doing.

    Victoria lawyer John Adams, who represents the East West Medical Society, said he was not able to discuss the lawsuit with the media.

    TURNING POINT

    Pan, who immigrated to Canada 12 years ago, said he put most of his family’s money into the college.

    Five years into his relationship with the Canadian College, both finances and academics were “going really well,” he said in an interview, noting that the school was already associated with two universities in China.

    But in late 2009, Pan was banned from the college property, and some board members determined he could no longer buy the property, said Mar, his lawyer. Pan’s statement of claim says the society no longer honoured the agreement and demanded a purchase price of $1.4 million.

    In May 2012, the new board applied to place the society into receivership. The receiver has continued the claims against Pan and his wife, Mar said.

    “Apart from any legal issues in action, the question remains as to whether there was fair treatment for Dr. Pan for his financial support and personal dedication over the five years without pay,” Mar said.

    Ultimately, the courts will decide.
    Gene Ching
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  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ....and completely ghastly.
    If only China would recognize mental illness on par with 'developed nations', there could be some positive outcomes to allow for appropriate use of medication and psychotherapy to alleviate the burdon from herbal medicine, prescription, which fit the description of placebo and may even aggravte said condition.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    She's fully certified and doesn't advertise at all. Her business is strictly word-of-mouth and she's constantly dealing with rather obvious undercover cops trying to book appointments. They're pretty easy to figure out since all of her recommendations are chart-able. So it's troublesome both ways.
    I know this post is old, but is still relevant. I always wondered how does one deal w/ nonsense when a place is obviously a legit TCM clinic? I think a lot of Americans and probably "westerners" in general don't realize how inter-twined TCM and CMA are linked together within the traditional cultural context of the Chinese culture.
    But as people have mentioned there are many non-legit places that pop up that give clinics a bad name- some probably involved in human trafficking, gangs etc.
    Some years ago while attending a Tai Chi class 2 guys had come into my teacher's studio, and were leaving as class was starting. They had obviously received treatment before class and said "it wasn't what they were expecting" and were "disappointed." Now by this time class had filled up with about half a dozen of us for Chen style Tai Chi and Push Hands. My teacher invited those two men to observe the class which they did for about 10 minutes, they kept looking at each other puzzled, then slunk their way out the door.
    Now what got me was this- my teacher is a Chinese doctor. she is also a tai chi and qigong master, having expanded her training w/ some quite prolific masters such as master's Feng Zhi Qiang, Li De Yin (one of her teacher's from China who visited) and the list goes on. She has newspaper clippings & certificate's on her wall about her Tai Chi school/ medicine clinic, several of her books/ DVD's are displayed on the front counter, she has a room full of herbs, her son, husband sometimes work there, and a couple of the people she employs are caucasion etc. How the heck did those 2 guys think they would have a good time at this place? It puzzled me.
    Do some people simply have no clue whatsoever? Oh well I think my teacher did a good job by starting class and having them observe- and when you watch my teacher lead a class you are watching a master. I just couldn't believe these guys could be so stupid, and also, I found it insulting.
    During one of our kung-fu movie nights my teacher said Chinese masters of kung fu were always also doctors/ knew medicine in the old days as we were watching "Iron Monkey".
    Anyway. End rant. It would be good to get someone else's take on the issue who understands what I'm trying to get at here.. in other words, how do we educate people? Maybe they'll just never know? What about undercover cops and for lack of better word "not-so-nice" people in an obviously legit clinic? If I was one of those people I would've walked through the door, seen the obvious, taken a pamphlet about classes offered from the front to be polite and walked on out of there...

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    What is the Chinese term for prostate massages? Some one here has got to know. Dale?
    I believe its "Thank you Bawang, may I have a another?" My Chinese is a little rusty...
    "if its ok for shaolin wuseng to break his vow then its ok for me to sneak behind your house at 3 in the morning and bang your dog if buddha is in your heart then its ok"-Bawang

    "I get what you have said in the past, but we are not intuitive fighters. As instinctive fighters, we can chuck spears and claw and bite. We are not instinctively god at punching or kicking."-Drake

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  11. #41
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    Thank you HH, may I have a another?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarathonTmatt View Post
    Do some people simply have no clue whatsoever?
    lol. Dude, just surf this forum for a while. You'll find plenty of posters who have no clue. But that's ok. We are here to give them some clues.
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  12. #42
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    quackery...

    ...or in this case, piggery.

    Chinese medicine practitioner suspended over pig intestine mix-up
    Date January 5, 2015
    Rania Spooner
    Crime reporter

    A Chinese medicine practitioner has been reprimanded after a patient complained she'd been told her bowel disease could be cured by injections of pig intestine cells imported from Germany, and that she would die young if she stopped treatment.

    The woman notified the Chinese Medicine Board of Australia in January 2010 after her condition, ulcerative colitis, had not been cured and requests for compensation failed.

    The woman also alleged the practitioner had failed to protect her privacy, failed to keep proper patient records, failed to label medicine bottles, and that she'd been told her bowel disease would lead to death as a result of bowel cancer if she stopped seeing her.

    The complaint was the only ever to be lodged against Essendon-based Ah Choo Teo, who has been registered to perform Chinese medicine and acupuncture therapies since 2003.
    Advertisement

    Based on Mrs Teo's own admissions, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal recently handed down a decision making findings of professional misconduct and unprofessional conduct involving communications she had made to the patient and practice administration.

    "I have been practising for so long, my patients are my first priority, I care for them from the bottom of my heart, everyone knows that," Mrs Teo told Fairfax Media following the determination.

    "VCAT and the Chinese Medicine Board made a decision that I respect."

    A summary of facts agreed on by the parties shows that while Mrs Teo accepted it was possible the woman had formed the view her condition would be cured by pig intestine cells, she claimed it was as a result of communication failures, that the woman must have misheard her.

    She told VCAT she never would and never had injected any of her patients with such cells.

    Mrs Teo had treated the woman with a series of vitamin B12 injections, and bottles of pre-compounded herbs that "may have contained traditional Chinese medicine herbs", VCAT was told at a hearing on December 11.

    Mrs Teo had failed to properly label the bottles, or provide the patient with information about what they were, "save to say they were herbs".

    While she accepted the patient had formed the view that Mrs Teo said she would die young and that treatment was "her only hope", Mrs Teo claimed she'd been speaking generally about people with her condition carrying a greater risk of developing bowel cancer.

    The VCAT determination against Mrs Teo was published on December 19, ordering that her licence to practise Chinese medicine and acupuncture be suspended for three months from January 19, and that once reinstated she would be audited every four months for two years.

    She was ordered to pay the patient $800, without having to make an admission of liability, and has been allowed to continue providing other therapies to patients during the suspension.
    Gene Ching
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  13. #43
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    busting the unlicensed and unqualified

    This is really about regulation as it doesn't appear that this regulatory body has actually busted anyone... yet.

    February 6, 2015 2:39 PM
    Ontario Court orders fake "doctors" of Chinese medicine to stop practising

    TORONTO, Feb. 6, 2015 /CNW/ - The Ontario Superior Court has ordered unlicensed practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine to stop practicing, ruling they broke Ontario's health laws.

    The unlicensed practitioners also set up a number of organizations which they illegally held out to be provincially-mandated regulatory bodies. The only legal regulatory body in Ontario is the College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario, (CTCMPAO).

    The ban makes permanent an interim injunction that ordered the unlicensed practitioners to cease practicing in June, 2014. In a multi-page decision released today, Mr. Justice Mew wrote:

    "The respondents are, or have been until restrained by the interim injunction, breaking the law. They must stop doing so. Whether they like it or not, the College is carrying out a regulatory function under statutory authority. The Divisional Court has decided that the regulations which the College seeks to enforce…are constitutional."

    The ruling means that patients who choose traditional Chinese medicine have the right to be treated by only those practitioners licensed and qualified to practice the profession in Ontario.

    "The ruling is clear: it means that obeying the laws that govern health professionals in Ontario is not optional. It means that professional standards and licensing rules apply to practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine in Ontario, just as they apply to physicians, dentists, nurses, psychologists and all the other regulated health professions in the province", says College Registrar Cristina DeCaprio.

    The colleges that govern regulated health professions have been established to ensure that properly licensed members adhere to standards of care in the interests of public safety.

    "The issue here is protection of the public. We welcome the court decision against these medical 'outlaws', who have been brazen in falsely holding themselves out as qualified doctors of traditional Chinese medicine", adds the Registrar, who urges members of the public to check the College's public registry to ensure they are seeing a licensed practitioner, at http://tcmpao.asicanada.net/imis15/registry .

    The individuals in question have knowingly refused to meet the standards required for Chinese medicine practitioners in Ontario, have illegally referred to themselves as "doctor" and have repeatedly ignored the law.

    In addition, some of the individuals have established and are associated with various organizations that have illegally pretended to be legitimate regulators of traditional Chinese medicine, and they have established a bogus registration process that falsely purports to authorize individuals to practice traditional Chinese medicine and acupuncture in Ontario.

    "All of this is illegal, and has been declared so by the court. We will continue to seek out and prosecute, in the interests of public safety, any unqualified, unregistered individuals who refuse to obey the health laws of Ontario as they apply to traditional Chinese Medicine and acupuncture", concludes DeCaprio.

    SOURCE College of Traditional Chinese Medicine Practitioners and Acupuncturists of Ontario

    PDF available at: http://stream1.newswire.ca/media/201...F_EN_12006.pdf
    For further information: Tom Curry, Lenczner Slaght, 416-865-3096
    Gene Ching
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  14. #44
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    Slightly OT

    It's a naturopath, not TCM, but relevant to this thread in some ways.

    Florida naturopath facing charges after treating girl’s fatal leukemia with vitamins and vegan diet
    David Ferguson
    25 Feb 2015 at 16:08 ET


    Brian Clement (Screen capture)

    A controversial herbal “healer” and naturopath is under fire after the death of a teen girl he was treating for leukemia using a strict vegan diet and herbal supplements.

    The Canadian Broadcasting Company reported on the death of the teen girl, who was from one of Ontario, Canada’s aboriginal First Nation tribes. Another teen girl from the same community is still in the care of Brian Clement, who Florida officials have ordered to stop practicing medicine and calling himself a doctor.

    Clement operates the Hippocrates Institute, a spa-cum-clinic in Orlando, Florida where patients with serious diseases have been treated with what the state of Florida is calling “unproven and possibly dangerous therapies.”

    Clement urges his patients to forego conventional medicine like chemotherapy in favor of veganism, supplements, juices and a raw diet.

    Makayla Sault was 11 years old last July when she left chemotherapy in Hamilton, Ontario, to attend the Hippocrates Institute, which is licensed in Florida as a massage parlor. The girl died in January. The Ontario coroner’s office is investigating.

    In the meantime, however, Clement has been ordered to cease and desist in calling himself a doctor — he is licensed only as a nutritionist, not a medical doctor — and to stop providing medical care to patients. The state issued their orders, along with a $3,738 fine, to Clement on Feb. 10. He was given 30 days to respond. He is facing possible felony charges of practicing medicine without a license.

    Another girl is still under Clement’s care. The CBC identified her only as J.J., an 11-year-old, also from the First Nations. J.J.’s mother said that Clement assured her that if she took her daughter off of chemotherapy, that his clinic could cure her cancer and save her life.

    J.J., she said, was treated at Hippocrates with laser therapy, IV vitamin supplements and a strict raw food diet.

    Clement denies telling the woman that he could cure the girl’s cancer or that his clinic has ever made such claims. However, the institute faced charges in 1982 in Massachusetts, when Clement was based in Boston.

    Massachusetts authorities charged Hippocrates and a related institute at least twice, said the National Post, for claiming to cure a wide variety of serious diseases with wheatgrass juice and other alternative treatments.

    The state prosecutor in Massachusetts accused Clement of claiming his treatments could cure AIDS, serious burns, diabetes, cancer and other illnesses, as well as fraudulent claims by Clement that he had been honored by the Nobel Prize committee.

    The Post said that Clement claims to have cured “thousands and thousands” of terminally ill people of their ailments.

    A spokeswoman for Hippocrates said that state authorities are in the wrong and acting on hearsay.

    “We deny these allegations in their entirety and will vigorously contest these allegations through the administrative process,” said Sachs Media Group PR rep Vicki Johnson to the Post.

    The CBC investigated Clement’s credentials.

    “Clement claims to have a doctorate of naturopathic medicine and a PhD in nutrition from the University of Science Arts and Technology (USAT), based in Montserrat,” said the CBC.

    However, when they contacted USAT’s president Orien Tulp, he said, “Brian Clement, he is not a naturopathic doctor from USAT. I can guarantee that. He shouldn’t be making false claims for one. If he is, I’ll withdraw his degree.”

    University of Illinois professor George Gollin — who has investigated USAT in the past — told CBC that the institution is “horrible.”

    “I could have printed him a degree on a laser printer and it would be … just as indicative of training and skills. What I think is terrible is that he’s using this, as I understand it, to treat patients who are desperately sick children,” Gollin said.
    Gene Ching
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  15. #45
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    This is exactly why I explain to people that you need to find a licensed health care practitioner rather than some unlicensed amateur who can harm you.

    It is disgusting to hear that this guy has done this for years. Ripping people off of money and promising the moon to ill people.

    This douchebag and others like him are the bane of health care.
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