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Thread: Traditional Mixers

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Chiang Po View Post
    Most people are just visiting their particular discipline of the month. My advice is try not to mix until after you've made your core style your home. Be intimate as opposed to familiar
    I agree with this. In a sense, it is the basics that you want to have completely solid before you start branching out. Basics pretty much map out across everything. Conceptually and tactically.
    Kung Fu is good for you.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Chiang Po View Post
    Most people are just visiting their particular discipline of the month. My advice is try not to mix until after you've made your core style your home. Be intimate as opposed to familiar .
    I agree with this statement, but I'm not sure it pertains the the posters. I myself have 10 years in the karate I studied, 4 in various souther styles, about 8 with my internal instructor, and now three in BJJ.

    I personally feel one could get a very decent understanding on a systems aims and how to achieve them after 5 years. After that you are just refining, developing your own game.

  3. #33
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    I haven't trained anything for more that 4 years because I've never lived anywhere for more that four years. so unless I wanted to take up Tae Kwon do, BJJ, or some other McKwon martial art, I'm sh!t out of luck. Kung Fu isn't known for it's universal availability. I train what I can when I can. Hopefully I'll be able to steer my way back to mantis.
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  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanHeChuan View Post
    so unless I wanted to take up Tae Kwon do, BJJ, or some other McKwon martial art(
    You could offend a lot of people with a statement like that, labeling Tae Kwon Do and BJJ with McKwoon styles... two styles that are actually highly regulated. You know where you stand in both styles locally and internationally based on your rank.

    You could do much worse than steadying either of those styles.

    Also, if you're always moving, you could easily pick up where you left off with styles like that. Where as, the guy in backwoods Mississippi might not know Shaolin Death Touch #55 quite as well as your sifu in NY did.

  5. #35
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    Meh, I don't care if I offend TKD, It's not like they could actually do anything about it. I don't like TKD and I don't care who knows it. It's one of the few arts sport actually ruined. old school TKD is still cool.

    BJJ may have a reputation for better quality, but I think the shear number of them qualify them for McDojo status. And I may dabble but I'm not ready to commit 10 years to the life style change, of teh gheyness.

    I lived in a town where my only two choices were Shorin ryu or ATA. I think everyone can agree I made the right choice. My point remains you make do with whats available to you.
    - 三和拳

    "Civilize the mind but make savage the body" Mao Tse Tsung

    "You're certainly intelligent enough to know how to be a good person without the lead weights of religious dogma." Serpent

    "There is no evidence that the zombie progeny of an incestuous space ghost cares what people do." MasterKiller

    "If there isn't a chance that you're going to lose in a fight, then you're not fighting tough enough competition." ShaolinTiger00

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  6. #36

    So I got invited to a BJJ class on the "thug" side of town

    Anyway... I went last night. It's ran by a Machado Purple Belt. Definitely a tough, but good crowd. Point is San- you never know until you try. Well, it went good- the Judo definitely helps because nobody could score a take down on me- but, when I tried to follow up a throw with Newaza- it was definitely their game. Point is- you should check out one of your "McKwoon" BJJ classes and see if you can run your mouth. Maybe you can, maybe you can't- but I guarantee you'll see something that most kung fuers aren't used too--- pure physical exhaustion and sweat... lots of sweat. I'd say the typical BJJ school is more "Kung Fu" than the typical TCMA school --- (Kung Fu definition; Hard Work).

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanHeChuan View Post
    Meh, I don't care if I offend TKD, It's not like they could actually do anything about it. I don't like TKD and I don't care who knows it. It's one of the few arts sport actually ruined. old school TKD is still cool.

    BJJ may have a reputation for better quality, but I think the shear number of them qualify them for McDojo status. And I may dabble but I'm not ready to commit 10 years to the life style change, of teh gheyness.

    I lived in a town where my only two choices were Shorin ryu or ATA. I think everyone can agree I made the right choice. My point remains you make do with whats available to you.
    I'm a 3rd degree BB in ITF TKD, you'd be surprised what I can do with it.
    I went from TKD to Kyokushin and didn't miss a step and was right at home.
    That should tell you something about what TKD can be.
    Genralizations are what make people say "Kung fu guys are a bunch of silk pajama wearing forms fairies".
    As for shorin-ryu, I have only been to 3 schools of shorin-ryu in ALL of them that sparred hard contact, which is far more than I can say about the majority of kung fu kwoons I have gone to.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by sanjuro_ronin View Post

    people say "Kung fu guys are a bunch of silk pajama wearing forms fairies".
    there is a reason for that
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  9. #39
    1. yes. we may take or pick whatever we like or need and drill on them.

    2. however, to integrate them into your things/system is more important.

    meaning, we have to have a underlying or universal core tactics and strategy.

    3. then all the pieces of puzzles will come together as "one" with you in them.


  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanHeChuan View Post
    so unless I wanted to take up Tae Kwon do, BJJ, or some other McKwon martial art, I'm sh!t out of luck.
    Don't let your own prejudice hold you back, San He. The good stuff is a lot more alike than different no matter where you find it.
    I have no idea what WD is talking about.--Royal Dragon

  11. #41
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    Point is San- you never know until you try.
    I have trained BJJ and will continue to do so on a limited basis. I’m just not going to commit to training it full time. I have found that I am competitive with the average BJJ player with up to two years of experience. More than that and I’ll get dominated on the ground. I find that is enough to suit my needs.

    That should tell you something about what TKD can be.
    I believe I admitted that TKD can be a worthwhile pursuit for a while, but It usually is not.
    old school TKD is still cool.
    I find that Olympic style TKD, has spectacular knockouts, because they allow no active defense and that is a shame. Not to mention other philosophical and technical beefs I have with the sport. Kyokushin while tough is more known for trading punches than a good defense, so that fits with my perceptions of TKD. I can't help but notice you chose to move on from TKD, did you find it lacking in some way? I assume it didn't take you 10 years to get your san-dan or that you otherwise consider it your base style?

    As for shorin-ryu,
    Maybe I wasn't clear but I chose the Shorin-ryu over the ATA TKD. Still I was ready to train TKD before learning of the Shorin-ryu school. Better than nothing right. I will train TKD if that's all that's available. I will not choose TKD over something superior for the sake of consistency. As you did not when moving to Kyokushin.

    I've trained TKD in the past, and I believe I could walk into any TKD school and claim a BB without anyone being the wiser. I may need a few months to brush up on my jump spinning back kicks though.

    In a sense, it is the basics that you want to have completely solid before you start branching out.
    If basics are the most important, and basics are relatively the same across most styles then it should not matter that you change styles until you find the style you wish to learn more than basics from. Not to mention just finding a school that teaches more than basics.
    Last edited by SanHeChuan; 09-22-2009 at 09:17 AM.
    - 三和拳

    "Civilize the mind but make savage the body" Mao Tse Tsung

    "You're certainly intelligent enough to know how to be a good person without the lead weights of religious dogma." Serpent

    "There is no evidence that the zombie progeny of an incestuous space ghost cares what people do." MasterKiller

    "If there isn't a chance that you're going to lose in a fight, then you're not fighting tough enough competition." ShaolinTiger00

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  12. #42
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    I went from TKD to Kyokushin because, at the time of my old school closing, only WTF was available to me in terms of TKD and Kyokushin was a far better match.
    Sorry, I did misunderstand what you meant about shorin-ryu.

  13. #43
    these days Bagua and Shuai Jiao. It is a very interesting mix. The Bagua is all form and solo drill which I study privetly, once in a while we do an application or two. The Shuai Jiao is done with a group where we spar regularly. So I find myslef mixing the two in sparring. The rooting aspect is very useful. In resent time I have had the pleasure of sparring with beginners, and I will let them try to throw me and not fight back which is a great way to test your root. Also it helps with stamina against the better students.

  14. #44
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    Capoeira meets Chinese Martial Arts

    Haven't found the actual film yet.

    Documentary showcases cultural heritage of capoeria and kung fu
    By Liu Xuan | chinadaily.com.cn | Updated: 2018-09-18 15:51


    Masters of capoeira and tai chi are "dancing" together. [Photo provided to China Daily]

    What would happen when Chinese kung fu meets Brazilian martial art capoeira?

    As a part of the Open Digital Library on Traditional Games, the documentary Capoeira meets Chinese Martial Arts was screened on Monday in Beijing and showed the sparks between the two traditional cultures.

    The 10-minute film, co-produced by the embassy of Brazil and Flow Creative Content, in partnership with UNESCO and Tencent, presents the meeting of Brazilian capoeira masters with Chinese martial arts masters in Beijing and Hangzhou.

    In the video, masters from both sides discuss how traditional cultures can thrive in modern society and still help people relate to others and understand themselves by exploring the differences and the similarities between their arts.

    Capoeira is an Afro-Brazilian martial art that combines elements of dance, acrobatics and music. It was developed in Brazil at the beginning of the 16th century. It is known for its quick and complex maneuvers, predominantly using power, speed, and leverage across a wide variety of kicks, spins, and other techniques.

    Although originating in Africa, capoeira also is integrated into the cultural characteristics of indigenous Brazilians. Therefore, it is considered to be one of the most important local cultural symbols and national skills in Brazil. It was granted a special protected status as intangible cultural heritage by UNESCO in 2014.

    The product is part of the Creation of an Open Digital Library on Traditional Games, a global project launched in 2015 by UNESCO with the support of Tencent, aiming to preserve and promote traditional and unique sports and games to safeguard living heritage, as well as pass it down to future generations.

    In 2016, the project team went on a research visit to collect data and audio-visual materials, including valuable interviews with professional players and the communities, such as practitioners, trainers, and guardians of the knowledge of traditional Brazilian games.

    As one of the most representative and unique traditional games of Brazil, capoeira also was documented into the digital library, so that people from all over the world can learn about it and how to practice it.
    UNESCO United Nations Educational Scientific an : Short film “Capoeira meets Chinese Martial Arts” released in the framework of UNESCO’s global project “Creation of an Open Digital Library on Traditional Games”
    09/17/2018 | 02:53pm EDT

    The short film 'Capoeira meets Chinese Martial Arts' officially released during the reception to celebrate the Brazilian National Day on September 17th. This 10-minute documentary, coproduced by the Embassy of Brazil and Flow Creative Content, in partnership with United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and Tencent, shows the meeting of Brazilian Capoeira masters with Chinese Martial Arts masters in Beijing and Hangzhou. By exploring the differences and similarities between their arts, these masters discuss on how traditional cultures can thrive in modern society and still help relate to others and understand ourselves.

    The release took place in the context of 'Creation of an Open Digital Library on Traditional Games (ODLTG)', a global project launched in 2015 by UNESCO with the financial and technical support of Tencent. Building upon UNESCO's activities in promoting inclusive knowledge societies, creating an International Network on Traditional Sports and Games, and safeguarding and promoting intangible cultural heritage, amongst else, the project utilizes Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) to preserve and promote traditional and unique sports and games, in order to safeguard this living heritage and pass it down to future generations.

    During the past four years, the project was carried out in six countries from four continents. Among the pilot countries is Brazil - rich in traditions and cultural heritage, including traditional games and sports. In 2016, the project team went on a research visit to collect data and audio-visual materials, including valuable interviews with professional players and the communities, who are practitioners, trainers, and guardians of the knowledge of traditional Brazilian games. As one of the most representative and unique traditional games of Brazil, Capoeira was also documented for the digital library, so that people from all over the world can learn about the game and learn how to practice it.

    Traditional sports and games convey values of solidarity, fair-play, inclusion, and cultural awareness. Moreover, traditional sports and games reflect cultural diversity, and foster mutual understanding and tolerance among communities and nations, contributing to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

    The value of the Open Digital Library on Traditional Games goes beyond the preservation aspect. It lies in the promotion of indigenous, traditional local knowledge for learning, development, and the Rapprochement of Cultures. This video is a perfect showcase of such endeavor. The initiative will certainly contribute to deepening the cultural and people-to-people exchange between China and Brazil.
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  15. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Haven't found the actual film yet.
    Add yoga and that's a mix you could definitely sell to suburban soccer moms. Sheeeeiiiittt, a person selling that as a class in Ann Arbor would become a millionaire.

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