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Thread: Shanghai 2010 World Expo & Shaolin Haibao

  1. #1
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    Shanghai 2010 World Expo & Shaolin Haibao

    China has funny mascots

    Armed police and an Expo mascot in Henan
    Posted by Joel Martinsen, September 29, 2009 7:52 PM
    Henan Legal Daily
    September 29, 2009

    Just two days ahead of the 60th Anniversary festivities on October 1, today's Henan Legal Daily featured a photo of a recent police exercise.

    The caption reads:

    To preserve overall social stability for the National Day, more than 1,300 police, armed police, firefighters, and security officers in Jiaozuo conducted an anti-terrorism exercise.

    But Henan is already looking beyond the 60th Anniversary to next year's Expo 2010, to be held in Shanghai.

    The Expo's mascot, Haibao, a stylized ren (人, "people") character with an ocean-wave tuft of hair, will star in the animated feature Shaolin Haibao, co-sponsored by the Henan Daily Press Group.

    According to the buzzword-heavy report, the cartoon will combine Henan's native Shaolin and Zen with the cultures of harmony and "sea treasure" (the meaning of Haibao's name), and will be an expression of the friendship that exists between Henan and Shanghai. Five thousand years of history plays a role, as well.
    Haibao stars in kung fu cartoon
    Date:29/09/2009

    Production started yesterday on a cartoon about the Shanghai 2010 World Expo mascot Haibao, who will show off his martial arts skills and embark on a journey exploring Chinese kung fu culture.

    Authorities in Henan Province, which is home to the famous Shaolin Temple, where kung fu originated, will organize the production.

    Henan Daily Group will be responsible for the program. The animation called "Shaolin Haibao" will show China's wisdom and culture of 5,000 years.
    World Expo Mascot Figure "Hai Bao" Debuts in Toronto
    By lily Updated:2009-07-01 02:33:51

    Annual "Taste of Asia" Carnival was held in Toronto on June 27 and June 28, which was an important content of "Asian Cultural Month" in Ontario. The personal admission ticket of Shanghai World Expo will be officially sold from July 1, 2009. And the debut of "Hai Bao" in "Taste of Asia" Markham Carnival sends invitation and blessing for Toronto citizens.
    Gene Ching
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  2. #2
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    i do believe this is scraping the bottom of the barrel!! is there anything they wont do for money now? shaolin is becoming sader and sader every day. this kind of stuff just really isnt necessary.

  3. #3
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    Shaolin & Wudang coming together for the World Expo

    I suppose I should include Shaolin Temple: Saga of Warriors Monks as another new show, but we've already had two others this week: Shaolin Spirit and Legend of Yin & Yang. I'm glad the biaoyanseng are finding work.

    I've been seeing that weird Haibao mascot a lot lately, particularly dangling off car windows like those old suction cup Garfields.

    Shaolin, Wudang to present Kungfu shows at Shanghai World Expo
    www.chinaview.cn 2009-10-29 23:17:32

    SHANGHAI, Oct. 29 (Xinhua) -- Shaolin and Wudang, two leading schools of Chinese martial arts, will both stage performances at the next year's Shanghai World Expo, offering a Kungfu gala for fans from around the globe.

    It will be the first time for Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists to perform at the World Expo that has a history of 158 years, as Shi Yongxin, principal abbot of Shaolin Temple from central China's Henan Province, and Li Guangfu, president of Mt. Wudang Taoist Association from central Hubei Province, singed here Tuesday performance agreements with the Shanghai World Expo organizers.

    Shaolin, in cooperation with Chinese, Australian and German artists, has produced a 45-minute stage play that tells a story of the cultivation and growth of little Shaolin monks in four scenes of the four seasons in a year. Dances, acrobatics and multi-media art forms can also bee seen in the play.

    The stage play, titled "Shaolin Temple: Saga of Warriors Monks," will be performed at designated theaters in Shanghai for two months during the Expo.

    In addition, Shaolin monks will present a total of 736 Kungfu shows in the half year when the Expo is held, about four per day.

    The Shanghai World Expo, with the theme of "Better City, Better Life," will be held from May 1 to Oct. 31 next year and is expected to attract 70 million visitors.

    "In Kungfu shows, Shaolin monks will carry out exchanges with spectators and teach them face-to-face some ways to strengthen their bodies and preserve a good health," Shi said.

    "Monks will also perform the famous 'Shaolin 72 stunts' that are exclusive to Shaolin Kungfu, such as the forefinger deep meditation stunt and the iron cloth stunt," he said.

    For Wudang, which is well-known for being a holy land of Taoism and its "Taijiquan," a kind of traditional Chinese shadow boxing, the Taoists have themselves produced a 30-minute Kungfu show "Wudang: Taiji Taoism."

    From next July to September, the Wudang Taoists will present a total of 276 Kungfu shows, about three per day, Li said.

    "It will be the first time for the Taoist culture, which advocates the idea of harmony, to appear at the World Expo. I hope through the Wudang Kungfu, we can present the world the traditional harmonious Chinese culture," he said.

    "In addition to shows of unique Wudang Kungfu, we will demonstrate different ways of traditional Wudang's tactical deployment of troops," he said.

    According to Shi and Li, Shaolin will dispatch 50 to 80 monks to attend the World Expo for Kungfu performances, while Wudang will send about 60 Taoists. Many of them are good at not only martial arts, but also speaking English.

    When asked whether Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists will hold a martial arts contest on stage during the Expo, Shi told Xinhua: "That needs the overall arrangement of the organizers."

    While Li said: "Since the Oriental culture and the Western culture can have exchanges, so it is absolutely OK for different schools of traditional Chinese martial arts to do so."

    "Let nature take its course, as we Taoists believe," he added.
    Gene Ching
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    So is anyone headed to the World Expo?

    I've never been to a World Expo...
    Kung fu masters set for Expo
    By Yang Jian | 2009-10-30

    VISITORS to the 2010 Shanghai World Expo will be able to see the invulnerable "iron skin" and the invincible 18 bronze monks from China's Shaolin Temple.

    And they'll also be treated to qinggong, the Wudang Taoist Temple's "light body skill" that can help people vault over walls.

    Masters from the country's centuries-old and most famous martial arts groups will also teach visitors some basic kung fu at the 2010 event in both Chinese and English.

    The Shaolin and Wudang temples yesterday announced they would send martial monks and Taoists to the Expo.

    Shi Yongxin, the 30th abbot of Shaolin, and Li Guangfu, the chief master of Wudang, signed contracts at the Expo bureau in Shanghai.

    More than 50 Shaolin monks, including young and senior ones, will perform Shaolin boxing and hard qigong (a kind of deep breathing exercises that can make the belly or the top of head invulnerable to knife and sword) four times each day during the 184-day event at outdoor squares around the Expo site.

    Many martial art skills that have never been performed publicly, including some of the Shaolin 72 Skills, the magic-like martial arts that can destroy wood and stone by fists and palm, will be on display, Shi said. The 72 skills are seen in many Hong Kong kung fu movies.

    At the end of each performance, monks will invite visitors on-stage for lessons in basic Shaolin kung fu.

    Some English-speaking monks will teach visitors from foreign countries, he added.

    Shaolin will also give a 45-minute stage show involving martial arts and acrobatics about the daily lives of Shaolin monks. Those will be in July and August.

    The Shaolin kung fu helps people maintain healthy lives, which is in line with the "Better City, Better Life" Expo theme, Shi said.

    Shaolin regards the Expo as a prime showcase for Chinese and Shaolin cultures, he added.

    The equally famous Wudang will dispatch 60 Taoists ages 20 to 30 to the Expo site from July to September.

    The Taoists will wrap boxing, swordsmanship and stick work into a stage show that will tell the story of the legendary Zhang Sanfeng, who is believed to have achieved immortality and founded the Wudang Taoist Temple in the Song Dynasty (960-1279).

    Wudang wants to promote its "harmony" concept by showing its kung fu to world visitors, Li said.

    Shaolin is famous for its powerful attacks, while the soul of Wudang kung fu is to conquer the strong by soft power, shifting heavy weights by a minimum force.

    The Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists may also fight for mastery of the Expo, according to Li.

    No extra money will be charged for the performances.

    The 2010 Shanghai World Expo will have a total of 20,000 sessions of performances.
    Gene Ching
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    More buzz

    My boss might go. I've told her to make sure to report on this, if she does. You don't know how satisfying it can be to tell your boss to work on their vacation.
    Kungfu Expo
    Published: 12 Nov 2009 18:01:51 PST

    Kungfu artists from two major Chinese schools will perform during the World Expo 2010 Shanghai

    The two major schools of Chinese martial arts, Shaolin and Wudang, have agreed to perform during the Shanghai World Expo in 2010, offering a kungfu gala for fans from around the globe.

    Agreements were signed on October 29 between Shanghai World Expo organizers and Shi Yongxin, Principal Abbot of the Shaolin Temple in central China's Henan Province, and Li Guangfu, President of the Wudang Mountain Taoist Association in central Hubei Province. It will be the first time that Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists perform in the World Expo's 158-year history.

    Working with martial artists from China, Australia and Germany, the Shaolin Temple has produced a 45-minute kungfu play called Shaolin Temple: Saga of the Warriors Monks, which tells a story of growing young Shaolin monks in four scenes set during each of the four seasons. The play features martial arts, acrobatics and multi-media art. It will be performed at Shanghai theaters for two months during the Expo.

    The monks will present 736 kungfu shows during the six months of the Expo, putting on an average of four shows each day.

    Shi said the monks would interact with spectators during the shows and teach them some of their methods to strengthen their bodies and maintain good health.

    "The monks will also perform the famous Shaolin 72 Stunts that are exclusive to Shaolin martial arts, such as the forefinger deep meditation stunt and the iron cloth stunt," he said.

    Practitioners in Wudang, which is well-known for being a holy land in the Taoist religion, have developed the famous Taijiquan, a form of traditional Chinese shadow boxing. They have produced a 30-minute kungfu show called Wudang: Taiji Taoism.

    From July to September 2010, the Wudang Taoists will present 276 kungfu shows, amounting to about three shows per day, Li said.

    "It will be a first for the Taoist culture, which advocates the idea of harmony, to appear at the Expo. I hope through Wudang kungfu, we can present the world the traditional harmonious Chinese culture," he said.

    Li said the Wudang Taoists would demonstrate different ancient martial tactics in addition to Wudang kungfu.

    The Wudang kungfu group is a non-profit organization that has never before done commercial performances. The group decided to appear at the Expo to perform an original show, which will be the first time domestic and foreign visitors will be able to witness Wudang kungfu up close. The Wudang performers are all skilled martial artists who are 20 years old on average.

    "The audience will be led into a Taoist world accompanied by Taoist music," said Li.

    As one of the world's intangible pieces of cultural heritage, Wudang kungfu fits into the Shanghai World Expo's theme of "Better City, Better Life" by letting the world know about Taoism, and the healthy way of life it promotes.

    Older Taoist practitioners will be among the performers who have spent almost all their lives perfecting their art and have seldom left Wudang Mountain, meaning that the audience will see genuine and original Wudang kungfu, said Li.

    The 50-80 Shaolin monks and the 60 Taoists who will attend the Expo are not only experts at martial arts, but can also speak English.

    Shi noted that it would be possible for Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists to have a martial arts contest on stage during the Expo, depending on "the overall arrangements of the organizers."

    "Since Eastern and Western cultures can have cultural exchanges, it is also absolutely acceptable for different schools of traditional Chinese martial arts to do the same," said Li. "Let nature take its course, as we Taoists believe."

    The Shanghai World Expo will be held from May 1 to October 31 next year and is expected to attract 70 million visitors.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
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    Shaolin vs. Wudang

    They should stage a battle.
    Two martial arts schools contend
    By Yang Jian | 2009-11-24

    A monk stretches himself out on five sharp spears, with two against his breast, another two on his legs and one on his belly, but when he gets up from the spears, there's no mark on his body.

    A Taoist priest dashes to a three-meter-high wall. His right foot hits the wall, then his left and his body vaults over.

    These sound like magic shows or kung fu movie stunts, but they are the very real "iron skin" kung fu of Shaolin Temple in Henan Province and the "levitation skill" qigong of Wudang Taoist Temple in Hubei Province.

    All kung fu fans know these seemingly enchanted skills from movies, and they will be able to see live demonstrations at the Shanghai World Expo next year.

    Demonstrations of the two biggest and most famous martial arts centers in China will be staged throughout the six-month Expo that opens on May 1.

    Kung fu masters will also teach visitors some basic skills -- in both Chinese and English.

    Shaolin kung fu is known for rapid and powerful strikes; Wudang kung fu is known for its inner power.

    The Shaolin site became famous as the Indian monk Bodhidharma, founder of Zen Buddhism, meditated there for nine years in a cave. The fame reached its peak in the Tang Dynasty (AD 618-907) as the first Tang emperor and his son (later to be emperor) were rescued from a warlord by 13 Shaolin warrior monks.

    With considerable imperial support, the temple became known as the "No. 1 Temple Under Heaven."

    At the Shanghai World Expo more than 50 Shaolin monks, both young and senior, will demonstrate Shaolin boxing and hard qigong four times a day at outdoor squares on the site. Qigong involves deep breathing "iron skin" exercises that are said to make the belly or the top of head impervious to weapons.

    Many martial art skills that are seldom performed publicly will be demonstrated, including some of the Shaolin 72 Skills, the magic-like martial arts that can smash wood and stone with the fists and palms.

    "Iron skin" is one of the 72 skills. Many Shaolin monks practice this because it can protect them so they do not need to fight, which accords with the Buddhist essence of mercy.

    It takes at least five years to develop "iron skin," says Shi Yanlu, chief trainer of the Shaolin kung fu monks. Shi will also attend the Expo.

    A monk with the highest level of "iron skin" skill can lie on a single spear tip without being injured, he says.

    Shaolin kung fu is do-able but requires years of continuous practice, he says. A monk practices an average of two hours a day and also does Zen exercises for many hours.

    Shaolin has 708 kinds of kung fu skills. Some disable opponents by attacking vital body points; some can dislocate bones with little force.

    It is also famous for its qigong, especially yi jin jing, which means "bone-changing skills." It is said to maintain healthy life and enhance the power of attacks.

    In kung fu movies, anyone who acquires yi jin jing will soon become one of the most powerful masters.

    The legendary yi jin jing will be demonstrated at the Expo.

    In July and August next year, Shaolin will present a 45-minute stage show of martial arts and acrobatics, demonstrating daily lives of monks.

    Shaolin kung fu helps people maintain healthy lives, which is in line with the Expo theme, "Better City, Better Life," says Shi.

    Taoist essence

    Wudang in Hubei Province is the origin of tai chi boxing. It is as significant as Shaolin but is lower profile.

    While Shaolin kung fu was developed as a way to protect Zen Buddhist books, Wudang was known for practicing the Taoist essence through martial arts. Thus, the Wudang Taoists live in seclusion and seldom perform publicly.

    From July to September, Li Guangfu, chief master of Wudang, will lead 60 Taoists, 20 to 30 years of age, to the Shanghai World Expo.

    Wudang aims to promote its "harmony" concept by showing its kung fu to visitors from around the world, Li says.

    The Taoists will combine boxing, swordsmanship and stick fighting into a stage show that will tell the legend of Zhang Sanfeng, who founded the Wudang Taoist Temple in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and is believed to have achieved immortality.

    While Shaolin is famous for its powerful attacks, the soul of Wudang kung fu is to conquer the strong by soft power, to resist rapid attacks by very slow movement and shifting heavy weights with minimal force.

    Around the world many people practice tai chi for exercise and at the Expo the most authentic Wudang tai chi boxing will be demonstrated. It has never before been "released" to the public, Li says.

    Wudang swordsmanship is said to be "No. 1 under heaven." Seven Taoists will stand in the shape of the Big Dipper and demonstrate. The formation is said to be able to defeat all kinds of kung fu skills.

    They will also fight each other with special weapons such as fans and horsetail whisks.

    The Shaolin monks and Wudang Taoists may also compete for mastery of the Expo, according to Li.

    Wudang sees the Shanghai World Expo as an opportunity to communicate with Shaolin not only by fists but also with minds, he says. Two magnificent shows "Legend of Shaolin Monks"

    Date: July-August, four performances daily

    Length: 45 minutes

    Venue: Pudong section of the Expo site

    It tells the story of how a young Shaolin monk becomes a kung fu master. It has four parts -- spring, summer, autumn and winter. The monk practices many skills and finally will fight with the 18 Bronze Monks. Zen philosophy is expressed.

    "Wudang -- The Philosophy of Tai Chi"

    Date: July-September, three performances daily

    Length: 30 minutes

    Venue: Public squares in Pudong and Puxi sections of the Expo site

    It tells the story of Zhang Sanfeng, who is said to have created tai chi boxing after witnessing a fight between a snake and a crane. Zhang is believed to have founded the Wudang Taoist Temple in the Song Dynasty (960-1279) and achieved immortality.
    Gene Ching
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  7. #7
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    I think chin woo is having it's 100yr aniversery tournament in shanghai at the same time
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    Good point, Shaolindynasty.

    Jimmy Wong was talking about that in our 2009 July/August cover story.

    I wasn't sure if this was implying Yanlu is putting on a new show. It doesn't sound like it. Yanlu is well within the Abbot's circle and stands to have an official Shaolin Cultural center if he doesn't already. It mentions the Shanghai show, so I'm posting it here for now.
    Shaolin Kungfu masters promote cultural exchange in Chicago
    www.chinaview.cn 2009-12-11 19:36:51

    CHICAGO, Dec. 10 (Xinhua) -- Shaolin Kungfu is a precious part of Chinese culture and Shaolin Kungfu masters are helping promote cultural exchange between China and other countries, and ultimately help enrich people's life all over the world, a distinguished Shaolin Kungfu master said here on Thursday.

    As the chief coach of Shaolin Warrior Monks, Shi Yanlu arrived in Chicago Monday, along with a group of other 13 Kungfu monks from Shaolin Temple in China.

    Invited by Suncastv, a Chicago-based IPTV provider, the Shaolin delegation will present Shaolin martial arts performance at Paramount Theatre of Aurora, a suburb of Chicago on Saturday.

    "We are here to showcase our Shaolin Kungfu and Shaolin culture. We would like to promote culture exchanges and help American friends get more interested in and better understand Chinese culture," Shi told Xinhua in an exclusive interview.

    Shi came from a well-known family of martial arts performers and became a monk in 1985. In 1988 he won the championship at the World Martial Arts Meeting held in Toronto, Canada. In 2004, he set up overseas divisions of the Shaolin Training Base in many countries including the United States, France, Russia and Germany.

    According to Shi, Shaolin Temple is a Chan Buddhist temple located at Mount Song in China's Henan Province. Founded in the 5th century, the monastery has long been famous for its association with Chinese martial arts and particularly with Shaolin Kungfu.

    "Shaolin Temple has a history of about 1,500 years. Generations of Shaolin monks have done years and years of research, experiment and innovation to develop Shaolin Kungfu into a famous martial arts form in the world," Shi said.

    "However, most people only know about the Kungfu but don't understand the deeper Shaolin culture. The essence of Shaolin culture is a unique blend of spirituality, wisdom and courage."

    According to Shaolin Temple, the foundations of Shaolin culture are Chan, martial arts and medicine. It advocates the Shaolin way of life in order to improve the physical and spiritual well-being of humanity. Its ultimate goal is to promote, put into practice and spread the Shaolin Chan sect spirit to the world.

    Asked about the international influence of Shaolin culture, Shi said: "Shaolin Temple has become more and more international over the last few years. We maintain exchanges with hundreds of cities and regions in the world. Each year we welcome thousands of international friends to Shaolin Temple for short-term or long-term training. Meanwhile, we are also trying to send our Kungfu monks to different places of the world so that we can bring Shaolin culture closer to people who love it."

    As one of its international training bases, Chicago Shaolin Temple was established a couple of years ago to introduce and promote Shaolin culture in Chicago and beyond.

    "We have set up centers in France, Russian, Germany and so on. ... Hopefully, our overseas centers can help people not only to learn and practice Shaolin Kungfu, but also to understand our culture better," Shi said.

    "Shaolin culture is a precious part of Chinese culture. By spreading Shaolin culture to more and more people in the world, we help them get to know and become more interested in Chinese culture. As a result, it will ultimately enrich people's life both spiritually and physically."

    According to Shi, Shaolin will stage performances titled "Shaolin Temple: Saga of Warriors Monks" during the 2010 Shanghai World Expo, offering a Kungfu gala for fans from around the globe.

    "We are very excited and grateful about this wonderful opportunity to show the world our Kungfu. We are working very hard to prepare for it now and we will do our best to help make the Shanghai World Expo the best expo in history," Shi said.

    Liu Yingbiao, secretary general of Shaolin Charity and Welfare Fund, is leader of the Shaolin Temple delegation. "I joined Shaolin Temple in 1983 when it was not very well known yet. Today we are known worldwide for our Shaolin Kungfu. Many international VIPs have visited our Temple including former Russian President Vladimir Putin. We would love to serve as a bridge to help promote communication between China and the rest of the world," Liu said.

    Talking about the Shanghai Expo 2010, Liu said: "Shaolin Temple will have an 80-people group to perform. We are very fortunate to have this opportunity to present to the whole world our Shaolin culture and help them understand and appreciate Chinese culture better."

    Xie Yunliang, acting consul general of the Chinese Consulate in Chicago, said the Shaolin Kungfu masters' visit to Chicago was "very meaningful." "Shaolin Kungfu is not only martial arts, but also a philosophy. That is why it can last for 1,500 years and become even more popular today. I am very happy to see that Shaolin Temple has started entering the world stage, promoting cultural exchanges around the world."

    "(U.S.) President (Barack) Obama has just had a very successful visit to China in November. ... Cultural exchange plays a very important role in enhancing U.S.-China relations. Shaolin Temple is making a great contribution to promoting Chinese culture and enhancing cultural exchange," Xie added.
    Gene Ching
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  9. #9
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    I met yanlu at his school when I was at shaolin last summer. I will be at the chicago perfomance this saturday.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Fpn08QRCnE
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    Jackie Chan on the Rose Parade float

    See 2010 Rose Parade, part 7 @ 5:30-7:30.
    Gene Ching
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    You were right, Shaolindynasty

    From the Jimmy Wong's Legends of Kung Fu site:
    100 years of Chin Woo Celebration & World Championship in CHINA
    Beijing - Tianjin - Shanghai
    July 27 - Aug 9, 2010
    That definitely overlaps with May 1 to October 31.

    Kung fu king Jackie Chan kicks on for parade
    English.news.cn 2010-01-18 11:21:16

    BEIJING, Jan. 18 --Famous for his acrobatic fighting style and signature stunt movies, Jackie Chan is a kung fu movie legend with millions of fans around the world.

    Starring in more than 100 movies has not only secured him a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, but also turned him into a Chinese cultural icon.

    Together with Shanghai-native National Basketball Association star Yao Ming and famous pianist Lang Lang, Chan has been selected as an image ambassador for the upcoming World Expo 2010 Shanghai.

    Two of them, Chan and Yao, flew to the southern California town of Pasadena at the start of the year to feature on the Expo Shanghai float in the 121st Tournament of Roses Parade, one of the most famous and traditional New Year's Day celebration activities in the United States.

    Chan discussed his contribution to Chinese culture as well as the work of being an Expo ambassador after the parade finished.

    Q: What's your impression of the Expo Shanghai float at the Tournament of Roses in Pasadena?

    A: I was quite proud to see a Chinese float in an influential foreign country like the US.

    It seems that many big international events have occurred in China in recent years, the Olympics, World Expo and the Asian Games. I'm touched to see so many people devoted to working for the events.

    Q: What was it like as one of the few on the float for the entire parade?

    A: Oh, that was tiring. I could hardly move my shoulders the next morning after waving and smiling to the crowd for the three-hour parade.

    My arms gave out, my face muscles stiffened and the seat was so small. But I was happy to hear people of different races chanting "Jackie Chan" along the road.

    Q: You seem to be a popular image ambassador for big events. What do you think of the job?

    A: Yes, I was selected to be the image ambassador for the Beijing Olympics in 2008 and this time for Expo Shanghai. Also, I will work for the Asian Games to be held in Guangzhou. The government and organizers call me whenever there's an overseas promotion for big events.

    Of course I'm happy to be an image ambassador, and if my influence helps I am pleased to do the job. It's tiring being Jackie Chan, but it's also a self-improvement process as I learn a lot by doing this.

    Q: Are you comfortable being a cultural icon and even a symbol for Chinese culture?

    A: It never occurred to me to symbolize Chinese people or Chinese culture, nor did I deliberately build myself into this. I originally went into the film industry to make money and earn a living.

    But as I grew up, I came to realize that incorporating martial arts (in my movies) was a quick shortcut to easy fame.

    That's why I chose to do my own stunts without any assistance or technology. In this sense, I subconsciously promoted Chinese culture, especially kung fu, to foreigners. The pressures are heavy but I feel my efforts paid off.

    I'm proud to have turned myself from a rough, redneck chap into a civilized man, although still not a well-educated one. It's an honor to showcase China's image and culture to the world.

    Q: As an image ambassador for World Expo Shanghai, what will you do to promote the event?

    A: The next couple of months will be critical, although I have already been busy attending promotion sessions and recording songs for Expo.

    I have a new project to start in April but I will set aside May for the Expo opening ceremony and other major events. Whenever Expo calls, I'll be there. If I really cannot make it, I will take turns with Yao Ming to fulfill our responsibilities.
    Gene Ching
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  12. #12
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    A river of maotai?!?

    Sipping maotai while ethnic girls sing to me? Dang. Forget those legendary Shaolin monks. It's straight to the Guizhou pavillion!
    China's provinces strive to outdo each other at Expo
    Wed, Mar 10, 2010

    SHANGHAI - A river of liquor, a robotic version of a famous emperor and Shaolin monks - China's provinces are going all-out to woo tourists and investors at Expo 2010 in Shanghai.

    The nation's 31 provinces, regions and mega-cities are using exhibition space near China's towering national pavilion to market local attractions, lure foreign funds - and in some cases, convey a political message.

    "They hope that visitors will flock to see their province, region or city thanks to the World Expo," Qian Bojin, deputy director of the Expo's China pavilion department, told AFP.

    "They want to lure guests from abroad and from China into coming to invest, to participate in construction, in development."

    Expo will open on May 1 and run for six months. Between 70 and 100 million visitors, 95 percent of whom are expected to be Chinese, will flood into Shanghai for the huge event.

    Authorities aim to use Expo to showcase China's growing global clout in the same way the 2008 Beijing Olympics did, and provinces have jumped at the chance to make their own - sometimes quirky - statement on the world stage.

    At the Guizhou pavilion, a mix of potent Maotai liquor from the southwestern province and water will cascade from a giant jug into a decorative river, Qian said.

    The first 30 visitors of the day will get a cup of liquor while ethnic Miao girls in colourful dress sing to them - a traditional custom for hosting guests. And every 1000th person will be given a bottle of the pricey spirit.

    Officials from Shaanxi province in the north are banking on history to draw visitors - robot versions of Tang dynasty Emperor Xuanzong (685-762) and his consort Yang Guifei, one of the four famed beauties of ancient China, will greet the masses.

    Henan province meanwhile will feature daily martial arts routines performed by its legendary Shaolin monks.

    "The pressure is huge," said Tong Genrong, deputy director for Henan's Expo organising committee.

    "After all, the Expo is so big, there are so many highlights - it's not easy to stand out."

    Planning for the regional pavilions began in 2006, and each province solicited designs from all over the world. All structures are expected to be completed this month, Qian said.

    Each region will be given a five-day theme window at Expo, during which hundreds of performances and activities will be organised, he added.

    Some of the pavilions have foregone the gimmicks to push a distinctly political message.

    Official documents say the Tibet area is focused on a "new Tibet, new development, new life and new changes" - two years after the eruption of deadly riots against Chinese rule in the Himalayan region.

    "Through items such as the Qinghai-Tibet railway, housing projects... the pavilion will showcase the tremendous changes under the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party," according to the Expo documents.

    Qian said Expo offered a particularly good opportunity for the more backward western regions of China to shine.

    "They... are extremely enthusiastic as they know that more than 200 countries and international organisations will be coming," he said.

    "So they realise they must publicise themselves to the world."
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  13. #13
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    50 monks

    Shi Yongxin answered a question I asked him on the Shanghai Expo very diplomatically in the 2010 Shaolin Special (on stands now ) but I sense this is a much bigger thing for him than he lets on with that answer.
    Shows feature monks, kung fu and city folk
    By Nie Xin | 2010-4-13

    THE World Expo won't lack for entertainment. Officials yesterday described a few of the performances that will be staged regularly during the event.

    One will be the thematic show "Windows of the City," a 30-minute story with music and dance that will show urbanites' warmth and care. It will run from May to October.

    Another is "Wudang; Tai Chi and Tao," an original martial arts program from the Wudang Taoist Kung Fu Academy. The 30-minute kung fu show will be staged from July to September. Three shows are scheduled daily.

    And more than 50 Shaolin monks, including young and senior ones, will perform Shaolin boxing and hard qigong - a kind of deep breathing exercise said to make the belly or the top of head invulnerable to knife and sword.

    They'll perform four times each day during the 184-day event at outdoor squares around the Expo site.

    Admission will be free once visitors are on the Expo site. Advance bookings are not possible by Internet, phone or fax. Visitors can reserve spaces in advance at the site of the performance venue several hours before shows begin, the organizer said.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  14. #14
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    Oooops

    There's a vid comparison.
    Copycat? Shanghai World Expo song hits sour note
    A Shanghai World Expo promo song is off the air after rumors of plagiarism -- of a decade-old J-pop ditty at that

    The Shanghai World Expo’s promotional lead-up song has been abruptly pulled by organizers yesterday because of claims that it was a direct rip-off of a 1996 Japanese pop song.

    To the untrained ear, “Right Here Waiting For You in 2010,” which featured voices of China’s biggest celebrities including Jackie Chan, Andy Lau, and Yao Ming, sounds exactly like J-pop singer Mayo Okamoto’s "The Unchanged You Is The Best.” Check out the You tube clip above for a verse-by-verse comparison of the two songs done by a Taiwanese media outlet.

    This is their second musical fiasco in recent memory, after the lip-syncing drama at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

    The Expo tune, composed by Shanghai Conservatory of Music graduate Miao Sen, was picked as the Expo promotional song after winning an open competition in 2004. Miao was unavailable for comment.

    According to Shanghai newspaper East Day, Expo deputy director Huang Jianzhi said the song was being suspended “for caution’s sake.” “We’re investigating the matter and will take action after clarifying the issue,” he said in the report.

    Music industry veterans and netizens across Asia are reacting with indignation. Established Singaporean songwriter Yan Yu-tian was quoted as saying that the two songs are 97 percent similar in rhythm and musical arrangement, while Japanese internet users are having a field day with the scandal.

    The Shanghai World Expo runs from May 1 to October 31 and is expected to attract 70 million visitors, state news agency Xinhua reported.
    I didn't know Yao Ming sang.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  15. #15
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    It's on

    Washington Post coverage
    Shanghai opens Expo with dazzling display
    By Farah Master and Ben Blanchard
    Friday, April 30, 2010; 2:36 PM

    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - Shanghai officially opened its multi-billion-dollar Expo Friday with a dazzling display of fireworks, lasers and dancing fountains, amid tight security and the virtual shutdown of its main Pudong financial district.

    After a rather low-key performance by singers and dancers in an indoor arena, the ceremony moved outside, with fireworks exploding off bridges and fountains shooting water up as high as 80 meters (263 ft).

    Some 6,000 LED fuchsia, red and yellow balls floated into the murky Huangpu River, creating a bright sea of balloons against the black water.

    "The World Expo is a grand event to showcase the best achievements of human civilization. It is also a great occasion for people from around the world to share joy and friendship," President Hu Jintao told a welcome dinner for foreign leaders.

    "As the first registered World Expo hosted by a developing country, the Shanghai Expo will be an opportunity for China and also for the world," Hu added, to an audience which included North Korea's number two, Kim Yong-nam.

    The city left nothing to chance for the big night, lining the roads with police and all but shutting down from early in the morning the Pudong financial area, home to China's tallest building, its main stock exchange and numerous upmarket hotels.

    China's business capital, playing host to world leaders including French President Nicolas Sarkozy and European Commission President Jose Manuel Barroso, is swabbing travellers for explosives at its airports, x-raying bags on the subway and even warning people not to hang their laundry outside.

    The Expo aims to showcase the latest technology and inventions from 189 countries ranging from the United States and Germany to North Korea and financially troubled Iceland and Greece, often in innovative or bizarre national "pavilions."

    Shanghai has taken great pride in hosting the Expo, nearly two years after the capital Beijing hosted the Summer Olympics, winning huge praise for the opening and closing ceremonies in another high-level security operation.

    The city has spent a reported $58 billion on the Expo and related infrastructure to accommodate the 70 million mainly Chinese who will visit during the six-month spectacular.

    The Expo site, which opens to the public Saturday morning, is expected to host on average more than 300,000 visitors a day.

    "It's not a waste of money because as Chinese we need to support it. It is necessary for China as it will help us rise in international stature," said Chen Wei, 26, who was watching the ceremony on a giant screen in the ritzy Xintiandi shopping area.

    'PEARL OF THE ORIENT' REVISITED

    The Expo's theme is "Better City, Better Life," a slogan plastered all over rapidly expanding and crowded Shanghai.

    The main site has been designed to be environmentally friendly, incorporating the country's largest solar plant and the use of zero-emission vehicles. However, most of the pavilions will be demolished after October 31 when the Expo ends.

    The government also had to relocate thousands of people for the Expo, some forcefully, according to rights groups. Activists have been threatened by the police to keep quiet during the festivities.

    "The Shanghai Expo authorities should be mindful that many remember the 2008 Beijing Olympics as much for the arrests and detention of peaceful protesters and journalists as for the achievements of the athletes," said Sophie Richardson, Asia advocacy director at Human Rights Watch.

    Shanghai is counting on spectacle, business and tourism keeping politics out of most visitors' minds.

    The city has tried to revive the glamour associated with it in the 1920s, when Shanghai was dubbed the "Pearl of the Orient" for the lavishness of its glitterati and art deco buildings.

    Swathes of streets have been redeveloped, including the historic Bund waterfront promenade, where the government splashed out on a $700 million revamp.

    Still, not everyone watching the ceremonies on screens around the city seemed to know much about what an Expo, also known as the world's fair, is.

    "I was talking to a security guard the other day and he said the Expo only happens every 150 years. Is that true?" said Xiao Xiong, 32, a cleaner from the southwestern city of Chongqing.

    (Additional reporting by Royston Chan, Melanie Lee and Jason Subler; Editing by Jeremy Laurence)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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