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Thread: Shanghai 2010 World Expo & Shaolin Haibao

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    Kung Fu God of the whole world is more like it. I've always felt Bruce was more San Franciscan than Chinese.


    Good point. Bruce's fame and even a good part of his art are "Made in the USA"
    The PRC/CCP red seem rather . . . inappropriate.

    r.

  2. #32
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    ACK!!!!
    Yah...I think 李小龍 is not the best choice
    Yes, "Northwind" is my internet alias used for years that has lots to do with my main style, as well as other lil cool things - it just works. Wanna know my name? Ask me


    http://www.pathsatlanta.org

  3. #33
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    pretty pix

    I know several people who have been to the Expo already, but
    I have yet to hear from anyone who has actually seen these shows.

    Chinese martial arts showcased at Expo
    China Daily, Xinhua, August 23, 2010

    A monk from the Shaolin Temple performs Shaolin Kungfu at the Entertainment Hall of the World Expo Park in Shanghai, August 19, 2010. Monks from the Shaolin Temple and members of the kungfu team under the Wudang Taoist Association showcased two distinctive styles of Chinese martial arts, Shaolin Kungfu and Taichi at Shanghai Expo on Thursday. [Xinhua]





    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  4. #34
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    No pix

    We need more photos from this exhibit.
    Bruce Lee kicks back at the Expo
    English.news.cn 2010-08-26 10:27:01

    BEIJING, Aug. 26 (Xinhuanet) -- Kung fu icon Bruce Lee - a powerful figure in shining red ceramic - stands on one leg and kicks the other explosively, almost vertically into the air, balancing the Oriental Pearl TV Tower.

    Forty-nine other bright-red Bruce Lees in identical poses balance landmarks from around the world, such as the "Bird's Nest" National Stadium in Beijing, the Arc de Triomph in Paris, the Sydney Opera House, the post-911 World Trade Center site, the Guggenheim Art Gallery, the British Museum and the Burj Dubai hotel.

    The idea is that superhero Lee can lift mighty monuments.

    The spectacular kick is called the "Foshan shadowless foot" (Foshan wuyingjiao) because the motion is so fast that it is said to have no shadow. Foshan City in Guangdong Province nurtured Lee and other kung fu masters.

    The 50 figures, each around two meters high, are a big draw at the world Expo where they are clustered outside the Pavilion of Future in the Urban Best Practices Area. Visitors can stand next to the master and assume their own poses for photographers.

    The statues comprise an art installation, "China Kung Fu," by Shu Yong, the winner of the 2007 Florence Biennale Career Award. It combines sculpture with video and performance art.

    All sculptures, and the mini monuments, are made of famous ceramic from Foshan, one of the cradles of Chinese ceramics.

    Foshan is also significant because of its kung fu history involving Bruce Lee, Wong Fei-hung and Yip Wen.

    The installation was sponsored by 1506 Creative City in Foshan; 1506 refers to the date of the early Foshan kilns.

    "Some people challenged me saying that this piece is too aggressive," says Shu. "Those who say that don't have a deep knowledge of Chinese kung fu. Chinese martial arts activate one's inner power through body techniques that harmonize with the outside world.

    "The highest level of Chinese kung fu is restrained, self-cultivated and profound rather than arbitrary and aggressive."

    The director of 1506 Creative City, Qiu Dalin, says that if visitors don't know the history and background of Foshan, then they cannot truly interpret the sculptures.

    "The city is one of the birthplaces of China's ceramics and is also the largest ceramic production area in the world," he said.

    Porcelain from Foshan can be seen virtually everywhere in the world.

    "But many people don't realize the significance of Foshan. I'm glad this is the first time Foshan ceramics and culture are presented in the spotlight of the World Expo."

    Artist Shu Yong says he is connected to Foshan because one of his ceramic works "Flower of Life" was made in Foshan.

    "At that time, I searched almost all the kilns in the country but still could not make it. By accident, and with help of Qiu Dalin, I completed the work in Nanfeng Ancient Kiln in Foshan."

    He said he began to understand Foshan that once represented a quarter of the world's ceramic production, and he learned its many stories.

    So when he thought of a work about Foshan, he thought of Bruce Lee to convey the message.

    The task was difficult, involving more than 200 people working for half a year, getting up at 8am and working until 2 or 3am, or even around the clock, said Shu.

    "Sometimes I felt like an abusive contractor, but actually I am an artist. Sometimes I felt very confused because I didn't want to be that harsh, but I had to get the work done."

    Shu is proud that the statues attract so much attention at the Expo.

    "They resonate with the viewers," he said.

    "We aim to make exactly 1,506 Bruce Lee sculptures because Nanfang Ancient Kiln in Foshan was built in 1506."

    He likes to imagine a touring exhibition of Bruce Lees made in Foshan.

    "It would be fascinating to see a cluster of Bruce Lees in front of the White House or the British Museum - both housing Foshan ceramics, a hidden link between these iconic buildings," he said.

    (Source: Shanghai Daily)
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
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  5. #35
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    More on Samsara the musical

    Maybe this needs it's own thread soon...maybe not.

    By Joyce J. Chansingh, 01/10/2010
    President’s Star Charity 2010 will be an international talent show

    Unlike last year’s footloose fest this year’s charity extravaganza will feature artistes’ exclusive talents to help raise funds for the beneficiaries. Plus, your chance to see Tay Ping Hui sing opera in English

    President's Star Charity 2010

    Gravity defying parkour performances (better known as the art of movement), acrobatics contortion, Shaolin kung-fu, powerhouse medley of timeless tunes, heart-stomping percussion number. This year's charity extravaganza looks set to be a spectacular affair with a stellar cast of local and international performers.

    Local celebrities from Channel 5, 8, Suria and Vasantham, winner and runner-up of Singapore Idol 3, Sezairi Sezali and Sylvia Ratonel, Project Superstar 2 Daren Tan, together with international star Karen Mok will join forces with various performers such as well-known comedian Norleena Salim, percussion group Bloco Singapura, the Shaolin Monks from Samsara - The Shaolin Legacy Musical as well as Alexey Goloborodko from Voyage De La Vie will do their bid in a bevy of performances to raise funds from viewers for 37 beneficiary organizations.

    Hosted by Soo Kui Jien and Michelle Chia, this year's President Star Charity will be a night of talent showcase featuring a combination of music, dance and acrobatic display, in high definition glory for the first time.

    At the press meet yesterday, the media was given a preview of a couple of performances from percussionists Bloco Singapura, beatboxer [and Idol 3 contestant] Charles "Stitch" Wong and 9-year-old drumming sensation Zidann.

    Not to be missed will be the opera singing Tay Ping Hui who will, for the first time, perform 'Italian opera' as part of a medley in "Andrea Bocelli style". The actor who's always up for new challenges told xinmsn: "When the company asked me what I'd like to do [for PSC 2010], opera just popped to my mind."

    "I didn't know they'll take me seriously but they did!" Having attended three lessons thus far, the self-professed perfectionist who doesn't speak Italian humbly rated five and a half out of 10 for his apprenticeship, citing "it's always good to pit ourselves amongst the best".

    When asked about his missus' reaction to his new challenge, Ping Hui replied: "She's used to me doing weird things and practicing extra-ordinary stuff in my backyard in the middle of the night."

    Local funnyman Gurmit Singh who's another regular face on charity shows will ditch his [Michael Jackson] dancing shoes for acrobatic stunts this time. The 45-year-old will join professional traceurs to perform a special parkour item to "scale heights and obstacles".

    At 45 years old, is Gurmit pushing his limits with such gravity defying stunts?

    "Yes I am! But if I were to go onstage and do something easy how boring is that for viewers? Let alone to part their money and donate."

    "This is one of those stunts that I find I'm really pushing myself because it's totally new to me. It's challenging but totally worth it for the beneficiaries."

    Amongst the artistes who will be lending their vocal talents through a medley of English tunes from timeless classics is Channel 8 actress Patricia Mok.

    The funny woman who was last year's "performer of the night" when she did a Michael Jackson's "Thriller" was noticeably disappointed about her "not challenging" singing segment.

    "Singing...I cannot sing you know! I want to be a dancer like last year!" Pat exclaimed and added, "But honestly that's a challenge for me lah because I don't like to sing."

    "But since it's group and it's for charity, I can try lah."


    Catch the President Star Charity "LIVE" on 17 Oct, Sunday at 7.30pm on Ch 5.

    Donation lines are open now till 24 October 2010:
    1900-112-8821 For $5 donation
    1900-112-8822 For $20 donation
    1900-112-8823 For $100 donation
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
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  6. #36
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    72 million visitors...

    ....and not one member of our forum here.
    Shanghai World Expo ends; drew 72 million visitors
    By ELAINE KURTENBACH, Associated Press
    Associated Press October 31, 2010 06:36 AM
    (10-31) 06:36 PDT SHANGHAI, (AP) --

    China wrapped up its record-breaking World Expo on Sunday with a lavish display of national pride, as organizers of the mammoth event pledged to continue pursuing more sustainable, balanced growth.

    More than 72 million visitors have been treated to a smorgasbord of cultures and technologies focused on the theme "Better City, Better Life" in the biggest, most expensive expo since such events began with the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London, which marked the coming of the Industrial Revolution.

    The event showcased China's rise as a modern industrial power, and drew accolades from U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, who said it "offers hope for tackling global challenges."

    "The Shanghai Expo will close soon but it will not be forgotten," Ban told dignitaries gathered Sunday for closing festivities. "Let us keep the Shanghai vision alive in our discussions and our lifestyles."

    The expo's theme of urban sustainability dovetails with Beijing's own agenda of shifting to a more sustainable pace of growth after decades of untrammeled industrialization that have brought unprecedented affluence, but also huge gaps between wealthy and poor and massive environmental degradation.

    Building better cities is an urgent priority, not "just something that would be nice to have," said Sha Zukang, U.N. under secretary-general.

    "We must make it possible and make it happen," he said.

    China spent 28.6 billion yuan ($4.3 billion) on the event and many billions more on improving subways, airports and other public facilities in Shanghai, a metropolis of more than 20 million people. The entire city got fresh paint, new landscaping and flowers and a kaleidoscope of decorative lighting.

    In an effort to make the event "green," Shanghai deployed electric buses and carts and installed energy-saving air conditioning and water filters meant to reduce use of bottled water. It also recycled rain water and made use of solar power.

    But lavish opening and closing ceremonies — Sunday's extravaganza included ladies in pink gowns wearing headpieces shaped to represent the myriad national pavilions — showed the country's obsession with exhibiting its newfound wealth and power.

    The majority of visitors were from the Shanghai region and elsewhere in China — ordinary folk who flooded into the city, enduring waits of up to 10 hours, sweltering summer temperatures and other inconveniences for what might be a once-in-a-lifetime experience of foreign places and people.

    The 72 million who managed to get to the event surpassed the previous record of 64.21 million visitors who attended the 1970 fair in Osaka, Japan. The two square mile (5.2 square kilometer) expo zone handled an average of 370,000 visitors each day, and a record 1.03 million on Oct. 16.

    "The pavilions look great from the outside, better than I expected, but I'm not convinced it's worth waiting for hours in lines to get in," said Liu Xiaoyin, who drove her 13-year-old daughter to Shanghai from a nearby city.

    For those patient enough to wait, highlights included Denmark's famed "Little Mermaid" sculpture, a rooftop cable car ride above a replica alpine meadow at the Swiss pavilion, famous impressionist paintings from the Louvre at the French pavilion, and entertainment by Cirque du Soleil courtesy of Canada.

    "Thanks to the expo, people like me who never would have a chance to go abroad can experience the whole world," said Zou Aiguo, a retiree from central China's Jiangxi province whose son gave him an expo tour as a present.

    Though the event did provoke some complaints, especially from those unhappy to be forced out of old housing to make way for the expo zone, the authorities stifled any public protests or dissent.

    All but a handful of the more than 200 structures built for the expo along the banks of the Huangpu river — former shipyards and steel works likely destined to become prime real estate — are to dismantled and recycled or otherwise disposed of.

    The next expo, in 2012, will be in the South Korean port city of Yeosu, with a similar theme of "Green Growth, Blue Economy," or marine-based sustainability. After that the expo will move to the Italian city of Milan in 2015, with a focus on food safety and security.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneChing View Post
    ....and not one member of our forum here.
    Was there in July. My review: Meh.







    The China Pavilion had this digital animated painting that was incredible.







    The USA Pavilion was a national corporate sponsored embarrassment.


    Forgot to mention. It was really crowded.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott R. Brown View Post
    This is not a veiled request for compliments

    The short story is I did 325# for one set of 1 rep.

    1) Does this sound gifted, or just lucky?

  8. #38
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    Very cool, wenshu

    Thanks for chiming in.
    Gene Ching
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    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  9. #39
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    Samsara revisited

    Not sure if this is the same Samsara.

    SAMSARA ★★★★★
    Attribution/author:Article by: Lucy Ribchester
    Publish date:23 August 2022
    Article Type:by:
    Two dance masters are at the top of their game in this duet of epic proportions from Aakash Odedra and Hu Shenyuan


    Picture: Jassy Earl

    Samsara is based loosely on the Chinese novel Journey To The West but thankfully no knowledge of that is necessary. You just have to surrender yourself to the seismic building of the world that takes place in Aakash Odedra and Hu Shenyuan’s dance.

    It starts with three figures onstage; two of them aren’t real, though you wouldn’t yet know it from Yaron Abulafia’s beguiling lighting. Hu emerges like a spirit hatching from an egg, undulating isolated muscles and stretching his limbs. He and Odedra stalk the stage in hooded black gowns, portentous and monastic. They battle in Shaolin-like spinning combat: legs and clothing slice the air. Then comes an evolution to a calmer, more curious place, where detailed hands and fingers (showing Odedra’s background in Kathak and Bharatanatyam) make bird and flower-like patterns in the air.

    The connection between the two men is astounding; Odedra supports Hu while he dances in midair; Hu suspends Odera from round his neck. They stand, one behind the other, making multi-limbed gods. One of the stand-out stars of the piece is undoubtedly singer Nicki Wells. As part of a live, three-piece band her voice sounds as if it’s coming from the centre of the earth. She brings a feminine power that counterpoints the masculine strength and beauty on display.

    When we come full circle to those statues again, with sand pouring down over them (and the dancers) in columns of light, it all feels tranquil, hopeful and weightless; as if the whole thing could be ready to begin again.

    Reviewed at Lyceum Theatre as part of the Edinburgh International Festival.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

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