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Thread: Tai Chi Courts

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Tai Chi Courts

    I wonder what the design of this court will look like if it happens.
    State senator wants $40k in public funds to build tai chi court
    By: Alan Suderman
    Examiner Staff Writer
    January 8, 2010

    A Montgomery County state senator is seeking $40,000 in public funds to build a tai chi court at Cabin John Regional Park.

    A bill proposed by Sen. Robert Garagiola would allow the state Board of Public Works to borrow up to $40,000 and award that money to the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, which would have to match the funds.

    About 15 to 30 people practice tai chi at the park every Saturday morning, according to Joanne Chang, a proponent of the court.

    The idea for a park came after David Chen, a longtime tai chi instructor who led free classes at Cabin John every Saturday, died in 2005, according to Charles Votaw, a member of a group raising funds to build the court.

    Votaw said friends of Chen from around the country started sending money in his honor, and Chen's former students decided to use the money to build a court.

    "People loved him -- that's what happens when you're nice to people and you share," Votaw said.

    Chang said a committee of tai chi enthusiasts is trying to raise the matching funds, bringing in about $25,000 so far. State taxes would be used to pay off the principal and interest of the loan given to the M-NCPPC.

    The court would be a circle 40 feet in diameter made with black and white flagstone, making a large yin and yang symbol on the surface of the court. Plans call for benches and trees to be placed along the edge of the court.

    Construction plans have been approved by the Montgomery County Planning Board, but convincing state lawmakers to approve using public funds for a tai chi court might be a hard sell.

    Maryland is facing a $2 billion budget deficit during the next fiscal year, and Gov. Martin O'Malley said severe cuts to state agencies are likely without help from the federal government.

    Garagiola could not be reached for comment, but advocates of the court is a good use of public funds because it would add value to the park and the surrounding area.

    "A little bit of an educated investment will go a long way," Votaw said.

    He said that if state money isn't available, his group would look for corporate sponsorships or individual donations.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  2. #2
    Thats cool.

  3. #3
    Probably will look like a large tennis court. Minus the nets.
    Time
    Slips through fingers
    Like this world of dust

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    The long versions of Chen and Yang use a lot of space in all directions. I think the later styles have more of a linear flow. If this is a space for small crowds to use, something like a football field would be best.
    Anything like a Bagua or Taichi pattern plan would seem to be for only one practitioner.

    Trees, resting, and watching areas are a must.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    local
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    it should be all stone and flagstone... nice stone benches to rest on, stone columns in foot work patterns, a bagua circle incorporated into the patio via red bricks... ahhhh... i can see it now... glad i have built my own in the front yard.

  6. #6
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    Seems a waste of money to me.

    a circle of diameter 40 ft is not enough room for 15 to 30 people to practice on. So they either have a subset on the court or none...and someone gets to practice in the mud after a rain no matter what you do.

    A smaller rest area with stretching bars, seating, and such, and a Chinese motif would serve better.

  7. #7
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    SF Tai Chi Court

    ttt42022!


    San Francisco’s first tai chi court opens in McLaren Park

    Practitioners historically shared the space with tennis players

    By Bay City News • March 22, 2022 1:30 am - Updated March 22, 2022 4:31 pm

    The City’s first tai chi court has opened in McLaren Park. (Courtesy Bay City News)

    San Francisco officials opened the city’s first dedicated tai chi space Saturday in McLaren Park.

    The Mansell Tai Chi Court sits on a converted parking lot with sweeping views of downtown and low berms offering protection from the wind.

    The $1.6 million project was funded through the 2012 Clean and Safe Neighborhood Parks Bond, according to a news release from San Francisco Recreation and Park Department.

    Though designed specifically for tai chi, the 4,500-square-foot tai chi court will also welcome park goers who want to stop and admire the view. An asphalt path was realigned south to pass behind the court and offer uninterrupted views from the court and improve park circulation.

    Historically, a passionate group of tai chi practitioners shared space with tennis players at the park’s tennis courts. The growing popularity of both activities prompted park neighbors to identify building a tai chi court as a top priority in the McLaren Park Vision Plan.

    According to the news release, the centuries-old Chinese martial art — now practiced for its health benefits — is believed to have been brought to the U.S. in 1939, when Choy Hok Pang began teaching tai chi chuan in San Francisco’s Chinatown.
    Now I'm wondering how many TC courts there are in the US.
    Gene Ching
    Publisher www.KungFuMagazine.com
    Author of Shaolin Trips
    Support our forum by getting your gear at MartialArtSmart

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    IL
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    The ecology of the spatial environment used for physical yangsheng practices has been addressed in some quarters and the work is revolutionary!
    As we become "Green" in many social climes, we naturally develop these intuitive native elements associated with well being and health, well beyond the physical though the physical environment is a stimulus.

    Link attached:
    Health, Identification and Pleasure: An Ethnographic Study on the Self-Management and Construction of Taijiquan Park Culture Space
    https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/fb5...27ddd21a33.pdf

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